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1.
J Virol ; 95(24): e0139921, 2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691426

ABSTRACT

Targeting host factors is a promising strategy to develop broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. Drugs targeting anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins that were originally developed as tumor suppressors have been reported to inhibit multiplication of different types of viruses. However, the mechanisms whereby Bcl-2 inhibitors exert their antiviral activity remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms by which obatoclax (OLX) and ABT-737 Bcl-2 inhibitors exhibited a potent antiviral activity against the mammarenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). OLX and ABT-737 potent anti-LCMV activity was not associated with their proapoptotic properties but rather with their ability to induce cell arrest at the G0/G1 phase. OLX- and ABT-737-mediated inhibition of Bcl-2 correlated with reduced expression levels of thymidine kinase 1 (TK1), cyclin A2 (CCNA2), and cyclin B1 (CCNB1) cell cycle regulators. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of TK1, CCNA2, and CCNB1 resulted in reduced levels of LCMV multiplication. The antiviral activity exerted by Bcl-2 inhibitors correlated with reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis at early times of infection. Importantly, ABT-737 exhibited moderate efficacy in a mouse model of LCMV infection, and Bcl-2 inhibitors displayed broad-spectrum antiviral activities against different mammarenaviruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Our results suggest that Bcl-2 inhibitors, actively being explored as anticancer therapeutics, might be repositioned as broad-spectrum antivirals. IMPORTANCE Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 inhibitors have been shown to exert potent antiviral activities against various types of viruses via mechanisms that are currently poorly understood. This study has revealed that Bcl-2 inhibitors' mediation of cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, rather than their proapoptotic activity, plays a critical role in blocking mammarenavirus multiplication in cultured cells. In addition, we show that Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 exhibited moderate antimammarenavirus activity in vivo and that Bcl-2 inhibitors displayed broad-spectrum antiviral activities against different mammarenaviruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Our results suggest that Bcl-2 inhibitors, actively being explored as anticancer therapeutics, might be repositioned as broad-spectrum antivirals.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Arenaviridae/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/metabolism , A549 Cells , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/pharmacology , Biphenyl Compounds/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Cycle , Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects , Cells, Cultured/drug effects , Cells, Cultured/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cyclin A2/biosynthesis , Cyclin B1/biosynthesis , G1 Phase , Humans , Indoles/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Nitrophenols/pharmacology , Piperazines/pharmacology , Pyrroles/pharmacology , Resting Phase, Cell Cycle , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Thymidine Kinase/biosynthesis , Vero Cells
2.
J Cell Mol Med ; 26(4): 1144-1155, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685345

ABSTRACT

High glucose (HG) is one of the basic factors of diabetic nephropathy (DN), which leads to high morbidity and disability. During DN, the expression of glomerular glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) increases, but the relationship between HG and GLUT1 is unclear. Glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) have multiple roles in HG-induced DN. Here, we report prominent glomerular dysfunction, especially GMC abnormalities, in DN mice, which is closely related to GLUT1 alteration. In vivo studies have shown that BBR can alleviate pathological changes and abnormal renal function indicators of DN mice. In vitro, BBR (30, 60 and 90 µmol/L) not only increased the proportion of G1 phase cells but also reduced the proportion of S phase cells under HG conditions at different times. BBR (60 µmol/L) significantly reduced the expression of PI3K-p85, p-Akt, p-AS160, membrane-bound GLUT1 and cyclin D1, but had almost no effect on total protein. Furthermore, BBR significantly declined the glucose uptake and retarded cyclin D1-mediated GMC cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. This study demonstrated that BBR can inhibit the development of DN, which may be due to BBR inhibiting the PI3K/Akt/AS160/GLUT1 signalling pathway to regulate HG-induced abnormal GMC proliferation and the cell cycle, supporting BBR as a potential therapeutic drug for DN.


Subject(s)
Berberine , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Nephropathies , Animals , Berberine/pharmacology , Cell Cycle , Cell Division , Cell Proliferation , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Diabetic Nephropathies/pathology , Glucose/metabolism , Glucose Transporter Type 1/genetics , Glucose Transporter Type 1/metabolism , Mesangial Cells/metabolism , Mice , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism
3.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1628815

ABSTRACT

Outbreaks of influenza, caused by the influenza A virus (IAV), occur almost every year in various regions worldwide, seriously endangering human health. Studies have shown that host non-coding RNA is an important regulator of host-virus interactions in the process of IAV infection. In this paper, we comprehensively analyzed the research progress on host non-coding RNAs with regard to the regulation of IAV replication. According to the regulation mode of host non-coding RNAs, the signal pathways involved, and the specific target genes, we found that a large number of host non-coding RNAs directly targeted the PB1 and PB2 proteins of IAV. Nonstructural protein 1 and other key genes regulate the replication of IAV and indirectly participate in the regulation of the retinoic acid-induced gene I-like receptor signaling pathway, toll-like receptor signaling pathway, Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway, and other major intracellular viral response signaling pathways to regulate the replication of IAV. Based on the above findings, we mapped the regulatory network of host non-coding RNAs in the innate immune response to the influenza virus. These findings will provide a more comprehensive understanding of the function and mechanism of host non-coding RNAs in the cellular anti-virus response as well as clues to the mechanism of cell-virus interactions and the discovery of antiviral drug targets.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza, Human/immunology , RNA, Untranslated , Virus Replication , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Cell Cycle , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Influenza, Human/virology , MicroRNAs , RNA, Circular , Signal Transduction
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(2)2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637017

ABSTRACT

Malignant melanoma is still a serious medical problem. Relatively high mortality, a still-growing number of newly diagnosed cases, and insufficiently effective methods of therapy necessitate melanoma research. Tetracyclines are compounds with pleiotropic pharmacological properties. Previously published studies on melanotic melanoma cells ascertained that minocycline and doxycycline exerted an anti-melanoma effect. The purpose of the study was to assess the anti-melanoma potential and mechanisms of action of minocycline and doxycycline using A375 and C32 human amelanotic melanoma cell lines. The obtained results indicate that the tested drugs inhibited proliferation, decreased cell viability, and induced apoptosis in amelanotic melanoma cells. The treatment caused changes in the cell cycle profile and decreased the intracellular level of reduced thiols and mitochondrial membrane potential. The exposure of A375 and C32 cells to minocycline and doxycycline triggered the release of cytochrome c and activated initiator and effector caspases. The anti-melanoma effect of analyzed drugs appeared to be related to the up-regulation of ERK1/2 and MITF. Moreover, it was noticed that minocycline and doxycycline increased the level of LC3A/B, an autophagy marker, in A375 cells. In summary, the study showed the pleiotropic anti-cancer action of minocycline and doxycycline against amelanotic melanoma cells. Considering all results, it could be concluded that doxycycline was a more potent drug than minocycline.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Doxycycline/pharmacology , Minocycline/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Autophagy/drug effects , Biomarkers, Tumor , Caspases/metabolism , Cell Cycle/drug effects , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , Cell Survival/drug effects , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Melanoma, Amelanotic , Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial/drug effects
5.
Molecules ; 26(21)2021 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512508

ABSTRACT

As cancer remains one of the major health burdens worldwide, novel agents, due to the development of resistance, are needed. In this work, we designed and synthesized harmirins, which are hybrid compounds comprising harmine and coumarin scaffolds, evaluated their antiproliferative activity, and conducted cell localization and cell cycle analysis experiments. Harmirins were prepared from the corresponding alkynes and azides under mild reaction conditions using Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, leading to the formation of the 1H-1,2,3-triazole ring. Antiproliferative activity of harmirins was evaluated in vitro against four human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, HCT116, SW620, and HepG2) and one human non-cancer cell line (HEK293T). The most pronounced activities were exerted against MCF-7 and HCT116 cell lines (IC50 in the single-digit micromolar range), while the most selective harmirins were 5b and 12b, substituted at C-3 and O-7 of the ß-carboline core and bearing methyl substituent at position 6 of the coumarin ring (SIs > 7.2). Further experiments demonstrated that harmirin 12b is localized exclusively in the cytoplasm. In addition, it induced a strong G1 arrest and reduced the percentage of cells in the S phase, suggesting that it might exert its antiproliferative activity through inhibition of DNA synthesis, rather than DNA damage. In conclusion, harmirin 12b is a novel harmine and coumarin hybrid with significant antiproliferative activity and warrants further evaluation as a potential anticancer agent.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/chemical synthesis , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Coumarins/chemistry , Harmine/chemical synthesis , Harmine/pharmacology , Cell Cycle/drug effects , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chemistry Techniques, Synthetic , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Harmine/analogs & derivatives , Humans , Molecular Structure
6.
Molecules ; 26(21)2021 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512506

ABSTRACT

Three silver(I) dipeptide complexes [Ag(GlyGly)]n(NO3)n (AgGlyGly), [Ag2(GlyAla)(NO3)2]n (AgGlyAla) and [Ag2(HGlyAsp)(NO3)]n (AgGlyAsp) were prepared, investigated and characterized by vibrational spectroscopy (mid-IR), elemental and thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectrometry. For AgGlyGly, X-ray crystallography was also performed. Their stability in biological testing media was verified by time-dependent NMR measurements. Their in vitro antimicrobial activity was evaluated against selected pathogenic microorganisms. Moreover, the influence of silver(I) dipeptide complexes on microbial film formation was described. Further, the cytotoxicity of the complexes against selected cancer cells (BLM, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, HCT116, MCF-7 and Jurkat) and fibroblasts (BJ-5ta) using a colorimetric MTS assay was tested, and the selectivity index (SI) was identified. The mechanism of action of Ag(I) dipeptide complexes was elucidated and discussed by the study in terms of their binding affinity toward the CT DNA, the ability to cleave the DNA and the ability to influence numbers of cells within each cell cycle phase. The new silver(I) dipeptide complexes are able to bind into DNA by noncovalent interaction, and the topoisomerase I inhibition study showed that the studied complexes inhibit its activity at a concentration of 15 µM.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Coordination Complexes/chemistry , Coordination Complexes/pharmacology , Dipeptides/chemistry , Silver/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/chemical synthesis , Antineoplastic Agents/chemical synthesis , Cell Cycle/drug effects , Cell Line, Tumor , Chemical Phenomena , Chemistry Techniques, Synthetic , Coordination Complexes/chemical synthesis , Crystallography, X-Ray , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Stability , Humans , Molecular Conformation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Spectrum Analysis , Structure-Activity Relationship , Thermogravimetry
7.
Cells ; 10(11)2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488496

ABSTRACT

Human coronavirus (HCoV) similar to other viruses rely on host cell machinery for both replication and to spread. The p97/VCP ATPase is associated with diverse pathways that may favor HCoV replication. In this study, we assessed the role of p97 and associated host responses in human lung cell line H1299 after HCoV-229E or HCoV-OC43 infection. Inhibition of p97 function by small molecule inhibitors shows antiviral activity, particularly at early stages of the virus life cycle, during virus uncoating and viral RNA replication. Importantly, p97 activity inhibition protects human cells against HCoV-induced cytopathic effects. The p97 knockdown also inhibits viral production in infected cells. Unbiased quantitative proteomics analyses reveal that HCoV-OC43 infection resulted in proteome changes enriched in cellular senescence and DNA repair during virus replication. Further analysis of protein changes between infected cells with control and p97 shRNA identifies cell cycle pathways for both HCoV-229E and HCoV-OC43 infection. Together, our data indicate a role for the essential host protein p97 in supporting HCoV replication, suggesting that p97 is a therapeutic target to treat HCoV infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Valosin Containing Protein/metabolism , Virus Replication/physiology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Cycle/drug effects , Cell Line , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral/drug effects , Humans , Proteome/drug effects , Proteome/metabolism , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , Valosin Containing Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Valosin Containing Protein/genetics , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Uncoating/drug effects
8.
J Virol ; 95(24): e0139921, 2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443355

ABSTRACT

Targeting host factors is a promising strategy to develop broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. Drugs targeting anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins that were originally developed as tumor suppressors have been reported to inhibit multiplication of different types of viruses. However, the mechanisms whereby Bcl-2 inhibitors exert their antiviral activity remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms by which obatoclax (OLX) and ABT-737 Bcl-2 inhibitors exhibited a potent antiviral activity against the mammarenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). OLX and ABT-737 potent anti-LCMV activity was not associated with their proapoptotic properties but rather with their ability to induce cell arrest at the G0/G1 phase. OLX- and ABT-737-mediated inhibition of Bcl-2 correlated with reduced expression levels of thymidine kinase 1 (TK1), cyclin A2 (CCNA2), and cyclin B1 (CCNB1) cell cycle regulators. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of TK1, CCNA2, and CCNB1 resulted in reduced levels of LCMV multiplication. The antiviral activity exerted by Bcl-2 inhibitors correlated with reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis at early times of infection. Importantly, ABT-737 exhibited moderate efficacy in a mouse model of LCMV infection, and Bcl-2 inhibitors displayed broad-spectrum antiviral activities against different mammarenaviruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Our results suggest that Bcl-2 inhibitors, actively being explored as anticancer therapeutics, might be repositioned as broad-spectrum antivirals. IMPORTANCE Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 inhibitors have been shown to exert potent antiviral activities against various types of viruses via mechanisms that are currently poorly understood. This study has revealed that Bcl-2 inhibitors' mediation of cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, rather than their proapoptotic activity, plays a critical role in blocking mammarenavirus multiplication in cultured cells. In addition, we show that Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 exhibited moderate antimammarenavirus activity in vivo and that Bcl-2 inhibitors displayed broad-spectrum antiviral activities against different mammarenaviruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Our results suggest that Bcl-2 inhibitors, actively being explored as anticancer therapeutics, might be repositioned as broad-spectrum antivirals.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Arenaviridae/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/metabolism , A549 Cells , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/pharmacology , Biphenyl Compounds/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Cycle , Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects , Cells, Cultured/drug effects , Cells, Cultured/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cyclin A2/biosynthesis , Cyclin B1/biosynthesis , G1 Phase , Humans , Indoles/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Nitrophenols/pharmacology , Piperazines/pharmacology , Pyrroles/pharmacology , Resting Phase, Cell Cycle , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Thymidine Kinase/biosynthesis , Vero Cells
9.
FEBS Lett ; 595(17): 2257-2270, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439663

ABSTRACT

HIV preferentially infects α4 ß7 + CD4 T cells, forming latent reservoirs that contribute to HIV persistence during antiretroviral therapy. However, the properties of α4 ß7 + CD4 T cells in blood and mucosal compartments remain understudied. Employing two distinct models of HIV infection, HIV-infected humans and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected rhesus macaques, we show that α4 ß7 + CD4 T cells in blood are enriched for genes regulating cell cycle progression and cellular metabolism. Unlike their circulating counterparts, rectal α4 ß7 + CD4 T cells exhibited a core tissue-residency gene expression program. These features were conserved across primate species, indicating that the environment influences memory T-cell transcriptional networks. Our findings provide an important molecular foundation for understanding the role of α4 ß7 in HIV infection.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , HIV Infections/blood , Integrins/metabolism , Adult , Animals , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cell Cycle , Cell Proliferation , Gastric Mucosa/cytology , Gastric Mucosa/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunization , Macaca mulatta , Male , Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/blood , Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/virology
10.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408628

ABSTRACT

The present study sought to identify gene networks that are hallmarks of the developing inguinal subcutaneous adipose tissue (iWAT) and the interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) in the mouse. RNA profiling revealed that the iWAT of postnatal (P) day 6 mice expressed thermogenic and lipid catabolism transcripts, along with the abundance of transcripts associated with the beige adipogenesis program. This was an unexpected finding, as thermogenic BAT was believed to be the only site of nonshivering thermogenesis in the young mouse. However, the transcriptional landscape of BAT in P6 mice suggests that it is still undergoing differentiation and maturation, and that the iWAT temporally adopts thermogenic and lipolytic potential. Moreover, P6 iWAT and adult (P56) BAT were similar in their expression of immune gene networks, but P6 iWAT was unique in the abundant expression of antimicrobial proteins and virus entry factors, including a possible receptor for SARS-CoV-2. In summary, postnatal iWAT development is associated with a metabolic shift from thermogenesis and lipolysis towards fat storage. However, transcripts of beige-inducing signal pathways including ß-adrenergic receptors and interleukin-4 signaling were underrepresented in young iWAT, suggesting that the signals for thermogenic fat differentiation may be different in early postnatal life and in adulthood.


Subject(s)
Adipocytes, Beige/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic , Adipose Tissue, Brown/metabolism , Adipose Tissue, White/metabolism , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Biomarkers/metabolism , Cell Cycle/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental , Gene Ontology , Gene Regulatory Networks , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Models, Biological , Muscle Development/genetics , Neuropeptides/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Signal Transduction
11.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390787

ABSTRACT

The rapid spread of the pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus has created an unusual situation, with rapid searches for compounds to interfere with the biological processes exploited by the virus. Doxycycline, with its pleiotropic effects, including anti-viral activity, has been proposed as a therapeutic candidate for COVID-19 and about twenty clinical trials have started since the beginning of the pandemic. To gain information on the activity of doxycycline against SARS-CoV-2 infection and clarify some of the conflicting clinical data published, we designed in vitro binding tests and infection studies with a pseudotyped virus expressing the spike protein, as well as a clinically isolated SARS-CoV-2 strain. Doxycycline inhibited the transduction of the pseudotyped virus in Vero E6 and HEK-293 T cells stably expressing human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 but did not affect the entry and replication of SARS-CoV-2. Although this conclusion is apparently disappointing, it is paradigmatic of an experimental approach aimed at developing an integrated multidisciplinary platform which can shed light on the mechanisms of action of potential anti-COVID-19 compounds. To avoid wasting precious time and resources, we believe very stringent experimental criteria are needed in the preclinical phase, including infectivity studies with clinically isolated SARS-CoV-2, before moving on to (futile) clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Physiological Phenomena/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Cycle , Chlorocebus aethiops , Doxycycline/pharmacology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Transduction, Genetic , Vero Cells
12.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1466-1475, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343667

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly worldwide, causing significant mortality. There is a mechanistic relationship between intracellular coronavirus replication and deregulated autophagosome-lysosome system. We performed transcriptome analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from COVID-19 patients and identified the aberrant upregulation of genes in the lysosome pathway. We further determined the capability of two circulating markers, namely microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (LC3B) and (p62/SQSTM1) p62, both of which depend on lysosome for degradation, in predicting the emergence of moderate-to-severe disease in COVID-19 patients requiring hospitalization for supplemental oxygen therapy. Logistic regression analyses showed that LC3B was associated with moderate-to-severe COVID-19, independent of age, sex and clinical risk score. A decrease in LC3B concentration <5.5 ng/ml increased the risk of oxygen and ventilatory requirement (adjusted odds ratio: 4.6; 95% CI: 1.1-22.0; P = 0.04). Serum concentrations of p62 in the moderate-to-severe group were significantly lower in patients aged 50 or below. In conclusion, lysosome function is deregulated in PBMCs isolated from COVID-19 patients, and the related biomarker LC3B may serve as a novel tool for stratifying patients with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 from those with asymptomatic or mild disease. COVID-19 patients with a decrease in LC3B concentration <5.5 ng/ml will require early hospital admission for supplemental oxygen therapy and other respiratory support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Lysosomes/metabolism , Microtubule-Associated Proteins/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Autophagy , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Cell Cycle , Cholesterol/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA-Binding Proteins/blood , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
13.
Front Immunol ; 12: 673692, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325525

ABSTRACT

In a perspective entitled 'From plant survival under severe stress to anti-viral human defense' we raised and justified the hypothesis that transcript level profiles of justified target genes established from in vitro somatic embryogenesis (SE) induction in plants as a reference compared to virus-induced profiles can identify differential virus signatures that link to harmful reprogramming. A standard profile of selected genes named 'ReprogVirus' was proposed for in vitro-scanning of early virus-induced reprogramming in critical primary infected cells/tissues as target trait. For data collection, the 'ReprogVirus platform' was initiated. This initiative aims to identify in a common effort across scientific boundaries critical virus footprints from diverse virus origins and variants as a basis for anti-viral strategy design. This approach is open for validation and extension. In the present study, we initiated validation by experimental transcriptome data available in public domain combined with advancing plant wet lab research. We compared plant-adapted transcriptomes according to 'RegroVirus' complemented by alternative oxidase (AOX) genes during de novo programming under SE-inducing conditions with in vitro corona virus-induced transcriptome profiles. This approach enabled identifying a major complex trait for early de novo programming during SARS-CoV-2 infection, called 'CoV-MAC-TED'. It consists of unbalanced ROS/RNS levels, which are connected to increased aerobic fermentation that links to alpha-tubulin-based cell restructuration and progression of cell cycle. We conclude that anti-viral/anti-SARS-CoV-2 strategies need to rigorously target 'CoV-MAC-TED' in primary infected nose and mouth cells through prophylactic and very early therapeutic strategies. We also discuss potential strategies in the view of the beneficial role of AOX for resilient behavior in plants. Furthermore, following the general observation that ROS/RNS equilibration/redox homeostasis is of utmost importance at the very beginning of viral infection, we highlight that 'de-stressing' disease and social handling should be seen as essential part of anti-viral/anti-SARS-CoV-2 strategies.


Subject(s)
Cellular Reprogramming/genetics , Multifactorial Inheritance/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Acetylserotonin O-Methyltransferase/genetics , Arabidopsis/genetics , Arabidopsis/growth & development , Cell Cycle/genetics , Databases, Genetic , Daucus carota/genetics , Daucus carota/growth & development , Fermentation , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Mitochondrial Proteins/genetics , Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism , Oxidoreductases/genetics , Oxidoreductases/metabolism , Plant Proteins/genetics , Plant Proteins/metabolism , Reactive Nitrogen Species/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Tubulin/genetics , Viruses/pathogenicity
14.
Biomolecules ; 11(7)2021 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323103

ABSTRACT

Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important enzyme involved in prostaglandins biosynthesis from arachidonic acid. COX-2 is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and plays a major tumor promoting function. Accordingly, many efforts have been devoted to efficiently target the catalytic site of this enzyme in cancer cells, by using COX-2 specific inhibitors such as celecoxib. However, despite their potent anti-tumor properties, the myriad of detrimental effects associated to the chronic inhibition of COX-2 in healthy tissues, has considerably limited their use in clinic. In addition, increasing evidence indicate that these anti-cancerous properties are not strictly dependent on the inhibition of the catalytic site. These findings have led to the development of non-active COX-2 inhibitors analogues aiming at preserving the antitumor effects of COX-2 inhibitors without their side effects. Among them, two celecoxib derivatives, 2,5-Dimethyl-Celecoxib and OSU-03012, have been developed and suggested for the treatment of viral (e.g., recently SARS-CoV-2), inflammatory, metabolic diseases and cancers. These molecules display stronger anti-tumor properties than celecoxib and thus may represent promising anti-cancer molecules. In this review, we discuss the impact of these two analogues on cancerous processes but also their potential for cancer treatment alone or in combination with existing approaches.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Celecoxib/therapeutic use , Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Celecoxib/adverse effects , Celecoxib/analogs & derivatives , Celecoxib/pharmacology , Cell Cycle/drug effects , Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/adverse effects , Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/chemistry , Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/pharmacology , Humans , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/chemistry , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Sulfonamides/chemistry , Sulfonamides/pharmacology
15.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(20)2020 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298152

ABSTRACT

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels responsible for rapid neural and neuromuscular signal transmission. Although it is well documented that 16 subunits are encoded by the human genome, their presence in airway epithelial cells (AECs) remains poorly understood, and contribution to pathology is mainly discussed in the context of cancer. We analysed nAChR subunit expression in the human lungs of smokers and non-smokers using transcriptomic data for whole-lung tissues, isolated large AECs, and isolated small AECs. We identified differential expressions of nAChRs in terms of detection and repartition in the three modalities. Smoking-associated alterations were also unveiled. Then, we identified an nAChR transcriptomic print at the single-cell level. Finally, we reported the localizations of detectable nAChRs in bronchi and large bronchioles. Thus, we compiled the first complete atlas of pulmonary nAChR subunits to open new avenues to further unravel the involvement of these receptors in lung homeostasis and respiratory diseases.


Subject(s)
Lung/metabolism , Protein Subunits/metabolism , Receptors, Nicotinic/metabolism , Adult , Age Factors , Cell Cycle , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Protein Subunits/chemistry , Protein Subunits/genetics , Receptors, Nicotinic/chemistry , Receptors, Nicotinic/genetics , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/pathology , Signal Detection, Psychological , Smoking , Transcription, Genetic
16.
Bioorg Chem ; 114: 105131, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293593

ABSTRACT

Sets of 3-alkenyl-2-oxindoles (6,10,13) were synthesized in a facile synthetic pathway through acid dehydration (EtOH/HCl) of the corresponding 3-hydroxy-2-oxoindolines (5,9,12). Single crystal (10a,c) and powder (12a,26f) X-ray studies supported the structures. Compounds 6c and 10b are the most effective agents synthesized (about 3.4, 3.3 folds, respectively) against PaCa2 (pancreatic) cancer cell line relative to the standard reference used (Sunitinib). Additionally, compound 10b reveals antiproliferative properties against MCF7 (breast) cancer cell with IC50 close to that of Sunitinib. CAM testing reveals that compounds 6 and 10 demonstrated qualitative and quantitative decreases in blood vessel count and diameter with efficacy comparable to that of Sunitinib, supporting their anti-angiogenic properties. Kinase inhibitory properties support their multi-targeted inhibitory activities against VEGFR-2 and c-kit in similar behavior to that of Sunitinib. Cell cycle analysis studies utilizing MCF7 exhibit that compound 6b arrests the cell cycle at G1/S phase while, 10b reveals accumulation of the tested cell at S phase. Compounds 6a and 10b reveal potent antiviral properties against SARS-CoV-2 with high selectivity index relative to the standards (hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine). Safe profile of the potent synthesized agents, against normal cells (VERO-E6, RPE1), support the possible development of better hits based on the attained observations.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Oxindoles/chemical synthesis , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Cycle , Cell Line, Tumor , Chick Embryo , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Oxindoles/pharmacology , Vero Cells
17.
Cell Rep ; 36(2): 109364, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283971

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike (S) variants govern transmissibility, responsiveness to vaccination, and disease severity. In a screen for new models of SARS-CoV-2 infection, we identify human H522 lung adenocarcinoma cells as naturally permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection despite complete absence of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression. Remarkably, H522 infection requires the E484D S variant; viruses expressing wild-type S are not infectious. Anti-S monoclonal antibodies differentially neutralize SARS-CoV-2 E484D S in H522 cells as compared to ACE2-expressing cells. Sera from vaccinated individuals block this alternative entry mechanism, whereas convalescent sera are less effective. Although the H522 receptor remains unknown, depletion of surface heparan sulfates block H522 infection. Temporally resolved transcriptomic and proteomic profiling reveal alterations in cell cycle and the antiviral host cell response, including MDA5-dependent activation of type I interferon signaling. These findings establish an alternative SARS-CoV-2 host cell receptor for the E484D SARS-CoV-2 variant, which may impact tropism of SARS-CoV-2 and consequently human disease pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Receptors, Virus , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Cell Cycle , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gene Expression Profiling , Heparitin Sulfate/metabolism , Humans , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/metabolism , Models, Biological , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Proteomics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication
18.
Exp Biol Med (Maywood) ; 246(15): 1681-1687, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243784

ABSTRACT

Mediator is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex that mediates the interaction between different proteins as a basic linker in the transcription mechanism of eukaryotes. It interacts with RNA polymerase II and participates in the process of gene expression. Mediator complex subunit 19 or regulation by oxygen 3, or lung cancer metastasis-related protein 1 is located at the head of the mediator complex; it is a multi-protein co-activator that induces the transcription of RNA polymerase II by DNA transcription factors. It is a tumor-related gene that plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis and is closely related to the occurrence and development of the cancers of the lung, bladder, skin, etc. Here, we used the structure of mediator complex subunit 19 to review its role in tumor progression, fat metabolism, drug therapy, as well as the novel coronavirus, which has attracted much attention at present, suggesting that mediator complex subunit 19 has broad application in the occurrence and development of clinical diseases. As a tumor-related gene, the role and mechanism of mediator complex subunit 19 in the regulation of tumor growth could be of great significance for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of mediator complex subunit 19 -related tumors.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Mediator Complex/physiology , Neoplasms/pathology , Apoptosis/physiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Cycle/physiology , Cell Movement , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 653974, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202332

ABSTRACT

This study discusses substantive advances in T cell proliferation analysis, with the aim to provoke a re-evaluation of the generally-held view that Ki-67 is a reliable proliferation marker per se, and to offer a more sensitive and effective method for T cell cycle analysis, with informative examples in mouse and human settings. We summarize recent experimental work from our labs showing that, by Ki-67/DNA dual staining and refined flow cytometric methods, we were able to identify T cells in the S-G2/M phases of the cell-cycle in the peripheral blood (collectively termed "T Double S" for T cells in S-phase in Sanguine: in short "TDS" cells). Without our refinement, such cells may be excluded from conventional lymphocyte analyses. Specifically, we analyzed clonal expansion of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in vaccinated mice, and demonstrated the potential of TDS cells to reflect immune dynamics in human blood samples from healthy donors, and patients with type 1 diabetes, infectious mononucleosis, and COVID-19. The Ki-67/DNA dual staining, or TDS assay, provides a reliable approach by which human peripheral blood can be used to reflect the dynamics of human lymphocytes, rather than providing mere steady-state phenotypic snapshots. The method does not require highly sophisticated "-omics" capabilities, so it should be widely-applicable to health care in diverse settings. Furthermore, our results argue that the TDS assay can provide a window on immune dynamics in extra-lymphoid tissues, a long-sought potential of peripheral blood monitoring, for example in relation to organ-specific autoimmune diseases and infections, and cancer immunotherapy.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Cycle/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/immunology , Ki-67 Antigen/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Humans , Mice , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/therapy
20.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1466-1475, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096499

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly worldwide, causing significant mortality. There is a mechanistic relationship between intracellular coronavirus replication and deregulated autophagosome-lysosome system. We performed transcriptome analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from COVID-19 patients and identified the aberrant upregulation of genes in the lysosome pathway. We further determined the capability of two circulating markers, namely microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (LC3B) and (p62/SQSTM1) p62, both of which depend on lysosome for degradation, in predicting the emergence of moderate-to-severe disease in COVID-19 patients requiring hospitalization for supplemental oxygen therapy. Logistic regression analyses showed that LC3B was associated with moderate-to-severe COVID-19, independent of age, sex and clinical risk score. A decrease in LC3B concentration <5.5 ng/ml increased the risk of oxygen and ventilatory requirement (adjusted odds ratio: 4.6; 95% CI: 1.1-22.0; P = 0.04). Serum concentrations of p62 in the moderate-to-severe group were significantly lower in patients aged 50 or below. In conclusion, lysosome function is deregulated in PBMCs isolated from COVID-19 patients, and the related biomarker LC3B may serve as a novel tool for stratifying patients with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 from those with asymptomatic or mild disease. COVID-19 patients with a decrease in LC3B concentration <5.5 ng/ml will require early hospital admission for supplemental oxygen therapy and other respiratory support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Lysosomes/metabolism , Microtubule-Associated Proteins/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Autophagy , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Cell Cycle , Cholesterol/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA-Binding Proteins/blood , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
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