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1.
Biochim Biophys Acta Biomembr ; 1864(2): 183821, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1519618

ABSTRACT

Membrane-enveloped viruses are a major cause of global health challenges, including recent epidemics and pandemics. This mini-review covers the latest efforts to develop membrane-targeting antiviral peptides that inhibit enveloped viruses by 1) preventing virus-cell fusion or 2) disrupting the viral membrane envelope. The corresponding mechanisms of antiviral activity are discussed along with peptide engineering strategies to modulate membrane-peptide interactions in terms of potency and selectivity. Application examples are presented demonstrating how membrane-targeting antiviral peptides are useful therapeutics and prophylactics in animal models, while a stronger emphasis on biophysical concepts is proposed to refine mechanistic understanding and support potential clinical translation.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Peptide Fragments/pharmacology , Virus Internalization , Viruses/drug effects , Animals , Humans
2.
J Sep Sci ; 45(2): 456-467, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499288

ABSTRACT

Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have been studied since the early clinical treatment of SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Considering these two chiral drugs are currently in use as the racemate, high-expression angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 cell membrane chromatography was established for investigating the differences of two paired enantiomers binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor. Molecular docking assay and detection of SARS-CoV-2 spike pseudotyped virus entry into angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-HEK293T cells were also conducted for further investigation. Results showed that each single enantiomer could bind well to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, but there were differences between the paired enantiomers and corresponding racemate in frontal analysis. R-Chloroquine showed better angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor binding ability compared to S-chloroquine/chloroquine (racemate). S-Hydroxychloroquine showed better angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor binding ability than R-hydroxychloroquine/hydroxychloroquine. Moreover, each single enantiomer was proved effective compared with the control group; compared with S-chloroquine or the racemate, R-chloroquine showed better inhibitory effects at the same concentration. As for hydroxychloroquine, R-hydroxychloroquine showed better inhibitory effects than S-hydroxychloroquine, but it slightly worse than the racemate. In conclusion, R-chloroquine showed better angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor binding ability and inhibitory effects compared to S-chloroquine/chloroquine (racemate). S-Hydroxychloroquine showed better angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor binding ability than R-hydroxychloroquine/hydroxychloroquine (racemate), while the effect of preventing SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus from entering cells was weaker than R-hydroxychloroquine/hydroxychloroquine (racemate).


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/drug effects , Chloroquine/chemistry , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methods , Hydroxychloroquine/chemistry , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cell Membrane/chemistry , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/virology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Molecular Docking Simulation , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Solvents , Stereoisomerism , Virus Internalization
3.
J Mol Biol ; 433(10): 166946, 2021 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386061

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses are a major infectious disease threat, and include the zoonotic-origin human pathogens SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV (SARS-2, SARS-1, and MERS). Entry of coronaviruses into host cells is mediated by the spike (S) protein. In our previous ESR studies, the local membrane ordering effect of the fusion peptide (FP) of various viral glycoproteins including the S of SARS-1 and MERS has been consistently observed. We previously determined that the sequence immediately downstream from the S2' cleavage site is the bona fide SARS-1 FP. In this study, we used sequence alignment to identify the SARS-2 FP, and studied its membrane ordering effect. Although there are only three residue differences, SARS-2 FP induces even greater membrane ordering than SARS-1 FP, possibly due to its greater hydrophobicity. This may be a reason that SARS-2 is better able to infect host cells. In addition, the membrane binding enthalpy for SARS-2 is greater. Both the membrane ordering of SARS-2 and SARS-1 FPs are dependent on Ca2+, but that of SARS-2 shows a greater response to the presence of Ca2+. Both FPs bind two Ca2+ ions as does SARS-1 FP, but the two Ca2+ binding sites of SARS-2 exhibit greater cooperativity. This Ca2+ dependence by the SARS-2 FP is very ion-specific. These results show that Ca2+ is an important regulator that interacts with the SARS-2 FP and thus plays a significant role in SARS-2 viral entry. This could lead to therapeutic solutions that either target the FP-calcium interaction or block the Ca2+ channel.


Subject(s)
Calcium/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , Calcium/pharmacology , Calorimetry , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/virology , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Thermodynamics , Viral Fusion Proteins/chemistry , Viral Fusion Proteins/genetics , Virus Internalization/drug effects
4.
J Chem Phys ; 154(24): 245101, 2021 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293030

ABSTRACT

Ethanol is highly effective against various enveloped viruses and can disable the virus by disintegrating the protective envelope surrounding it. The interactions between the coronavirus envelope (E) protein and its membrane environment play key roles in the stability and function of the viral envelope. By using molecular dynamics simulation, we explore the underlying mechanism of ethanol-induced disruption of a model coronavirus membrane and, in detail, interactions of the E-protein and lipids. We model the membrane bilayer as N-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine lipids and the coronavirus E-protein. The study reveals that ethanol causes an increase in the lateral area of the bilayer along with thinning of the bilayer membrane and orientational disordering of lipid tails. Ethanol resides at the head-tail region of the membrane and enhances bilayer permeability. We found an envelope-protein-mediated increase in the ordering of lipid tails. Our simulations also provide important insights into the orientation of the envelope protein in a model membrane environment. At ∼25 mol. % of ethanol in the surrounding ethanol-water phase, we observe disintegration of the lipid bilayer and dislocation of the E-protein from the membrane environment.


Subject(s)
Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Coronavirus/metabolism , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Ethanol/pharmacology , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus/physiology , Lipid Bilayers/metabolism , Molecular Conformation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Permeability
5.
J Biol Chem ; 297(2): 100940, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293905

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 envelope protein (S2-E) is a conserved membrane protein that is important for coronavirus (CoV) assembly and budding. Here, we describe the recombinant expression and purification of S2-E in amphipol-class amphipathic polymer solutions, which solubilize and stabilize membrane proteins, but do not disrupt membranes. We found that amphipol delivery of S2-E to preformed planar bilayers results in spontaneous membrane integration and formation of viroporin cation channels. Amphipol delivery of the S2-E protein to human cells results in plasma membrane integration, followed by retrograde trafficking to the trans-Golgi network and accumulation in swollen perinuclear lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1-positive vesicles, likely lysosomes. CoV envelope proteins have previously been proposed to manipulate the luminal pH of the trans-Golgi network, which serves as an accumulation station for progeny CoV particles prior to cellular egress via lysosomes. Delivery of S2-E to cells will enable chemical biological approaches for future studies of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pathogenesis and possibly even development of "Trojan horse" antiviral therapies. Finally, this work also establishes a paradigm for amphipol-mediated delivery of membrane proteins to cells.


Subject(s)
Cell Membrane/drug effects , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Polymers/pharmacology , Propylamines/pharmacology , Surface-Active Agents/pharmacology , trans-Golgi Network/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , HeLa Cells , Humans , Lipid Bilayers/chemistry , Lipid Bilayers/metabolism , Lysosomes/metabolism , Polymers/chemistry , Propylamines/chemistry , Protein Transport , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Surface-Active Agents/chemistry
6.
J Biol Chem ; 296: 100470, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101336

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a major threat to global health. Vaccines are ideal solutions to prevent infection, but treatments are also needed for those who have contracted the virus to limit negative outcomes, when vaccines are not applicable. Viruses must cross host cell membranes during their life cycle, creating a dependency on processes involving membrane dynamics. Thus, in this study, we examined whether the synthetic machinery for glycosphingolipids, biologically active components of cell membranes, can serve as a therapeutic target to combat SARS-CoV-2. We examined the antiviral effect of two specific inhibitors of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS): (i) Genz-123346, an analogue of the United States Food and Drug Administration-approved drug Cerdelga and (ii) GENZ-667161, an analogue of venglustat, which is currently under phase III clinical trials. We found that both GCS inhibitors inhibit replication of SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, these inhibitors also disrupt replication of influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). Our data imply that synthesis of glycosphingolipids is necessary to support viral life cycles and suggest that GCS inhibitors should be further explored as antiviral therapies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Carbamates/pharmacology , Dioxanes/pharmacology , Glucosyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Glycosphingolipids/antagonists & inhibitors , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/drug effects , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , Quinuclidines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/virology , Carbamates/chemical synthesis , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/enzymology , Cell Membrane/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Dioxanes/chemical synthesis , Dogs , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation , Glucosyltransferases/genetics , Glucosyltransferases/metabolism , Glycosphingolipids/biosynthesis , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/growth & development , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/metabolism , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/enzymology , Influenza, Human/virology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Pyrrolidines/chemical synthesis , Quinuclidines/chemical synthesis , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
7.
EMBO J ; 39(21): e106057, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-846583

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by SARS-CoV-2 and has spread across the globe. SARS-CoV-2 is a highly infectious virus with no vaccine or antiviral therapy available to control the pandemic; therefore, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms of viral pathogenesis and the host immune responses to SARS-CoV-2. SARS-CoV-2 is a new member of the betacoronavirus genus like other closely related viruses including SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Both SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV have caused serious outbreaks and epidemics in the past eighteen years. Here, we report that one of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H), is induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro and in COVID-19-infected patients. CH25H converts cholesterol to 25-hydrocholesterol (25HC) and 25HC shows broad anti-coronavirus activity by blocking membrane fusion. Furthermore, 25HC inhibits USA-WA1/2020 SARS-CoV-2 infection in lung epithelial cells and viral entry in human lung organoids. Mechanistically, 25HC inhibits viral membrane fusion by activating the ER-localized acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) which leads to the depletion of accessible cholesterol from the plasma membrane. Altogether, our results shed light on a potentially broad antiviral mechanism by 25HC through depleting accessible cholesterol on the plasma membrane to suppress virus-cell fusion. Since 25HC is a natural product with no known toxicity at effective concentrations, it provides a potential therapeutic candidate for COVID-19 and emerging viral diseases in the future.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Cholesterol/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Steroid Hydroxylases/pharmacology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Acetyl-CoA C-Acetyltransferase/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19 , Cell Line , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Enzyme Activation/drug effects , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Organoids/virology , Pandemics , Respiratory Mucosa/drug effects , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Vero Cells
8.
J Am Chem Soc ; 142(40): 17024-17038, 2020 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-772998

ABSTRACT

Broad-spectrum antivirals are powerful weapons against dangerous viruses where no specific therapy exists, as in the case of the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. We discovered that a lysine- and arginine-specific supramolecular ligand (CLR01) destroys enveloped viruses, including HIV, Ebola, and Zika virus, and remodels amyloid fibrils in semen that promote viral infection. Yet, it is unknown how CLR01 exerts these two distinct therapeutic activities. Here, we delineate a novel mechanism of antiviral activity by studying the activity of tweezer variants: the "phosphate tweezer" CLR01, a "carboxylate tweezer" CLR05, and a "phosphate clip" PC. Lysine complexation inside the tweezer cavity is needed to antagonize amyloidogenesis and is only achieved by CLR01. Importantly, CLR01 and CLR05 but not PC form closed inclusion complexes with lipid head groups of viral membranes, thereby altering lipid orientation and increasing surface tension. This process disrupts viral envelopes and diminishes infectivity but leaves cellular membranes intact. Consequently, CLR01 and CLR05 display broad antiviral activity against all enveloped viruses tested, including herpesviruses, Measles virus, influenza, and SARS-CoV-2. Based on our mechanistic insights, we potentiated the antiviral, membrane-disrupting activity of CLR01 by introducing aliphatic ester arms into each phosphate group to act as lipid anchors that promote membrane targeting. The most potent ester modifications harbored unbranched C4 units, which engendered tweezers that were approximately one order of magnitude more effective than CLR01 and nontoxic. Thus, we establish the mechanistic basis of viral envelope disruption by specific tweezers and establish a new class of potential broad-spectrum antivirals with enhanced activity.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Bridged-Ring Compounds/pharmacology , Organophosphates/pharmacology , Viral Envelope Proteins/drug effects , Acid Phosphatase/chemistry , Acid Phosphatase/metabolism , Amyloid/antagonists & inhibitors , Anti-HIV Agents/chemistry , Anti-HIV Agents/pharmacology , Arginine/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Bridged-Ring Compounds/chemistry , Cell Membrane/chemistry , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/virology , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV-1/drug effects , Humans , Lipids/chemistry , Lysine/chemistry , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Organophosphates/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2 , Seminal Vesicle Secretory Proteins/chemistry , Seminal Vesicle Secretory Proteins/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Zika Virus/drug effects
9.
In Vivo ; 34(5): 3023-3026, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740631

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). One drug that has attracted interest is the antiparasitic compound ivermectin, a macrocyclic lactone derived from the bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis. We carried out a docking study to determine if ivermectin might be able to attach to the SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor-binding domain bound with ACE2. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used the program AutoDock Vina Extended to perform the docking study. RESULTS: Ivermectin docked in the region of leucine 91 of the spike and histidine 378 of the ACE2 receptor. The binding energy of ivermectin to the spike-ACE2 complex was -18 kcal/mol and binding constant was 5.8 e-08. CONCLUSION: The ivermectin docking we identified may interfere with the attachment of the spike to the human cell membrane. Clinical trials now underway should determine whether ivermectin is an effective treatment for SARS-Cov2 infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Ivermectin/chemistry , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Binding Sites/drug effects , COVID-19 , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Repositioning , Histidine/chemistry , Humans , Ivermectin/therapeutic use , Leucine/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/drug effects , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Streptomyces/chemistry
10.
Am J Physiol Cell Physiol ; 319(3): C500-C509, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-656622

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), an enveloped virus with a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome, facilitates the host cell entry through intricate interactions with proteins and lipids of the cell membrane. The detailed molecular mechanism involves binding to the host cell receptor and fusion at the plasma membrane or after being trafficked to late endosomes under favorable environmental conditions. A crucial event in the process is the proteolytic cleavage of the viral spike protein by the host's endogenous proteases that releases the fusion peptide enabling fusion with the host cellular membrane system. The present review details the mechanism of viral fusion with the host and highlights the therapeutic options that prevent SARS-CoV-2 entry in humans.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/virology , Humans , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Protein Binding/drug effects , Protein Binding/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Fusion Proteins/drug effects
12.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 882: 173237, 2020 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548751

ABSTRACT

Pirfenidone (PFD), a pyridone compound, is well recognized as an antifibrotic agent tailored for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Recently, through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects, PFD based clinical trial has also been launched for the treatment of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). To what extent this drug can perturb membrane ion currents remains largely unknown. Herein, the exposure to PFD was observed to depress the amplitude of hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) in combination with a considerable slowing in the activation time of the current in pituitary GH3 cells. In the continued presence of ivabradine or zatebradine, subsequent application of PFD decreased Ih amplitude further. The presence of PFD resulted in a leftward shift in Ih activation curve without changes in the gating charge. The addition of this compound also led to a reduction in area of voltage-dependent hysteresis evoked by long-lasting inverted triangular (downsloping and upsloping) ramp pulse. Neither the amplitude of M-type nor erg-mediated K+ current was altered by its presence. In whole-cell potential recordings, addition of PFD reduced the firing frequency, and this effect was accompanied by the depression in the amplitude of sag voltage elicited by hyperpolarizing current stimulus. Overall, this study highlights evidence that PFD is capable of perturbing specific ionic currents, revealing a potential additional impact on functional activities of different excitable cells.


Subject(s)
Cell Membrane/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pyridones/pharmacology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cations/metabolism , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Ion Channels/drug effects , Ion Channels/metabolism , Ion Transport/drug effects , Membrane Potentials/drug effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Potassium/metabolism , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Rats , SARS-CoV-2 , Sodium/metabolism
13.
Neurochem Int ; 138: 104779, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-436706

ABSTRACT

The brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed in pre-synaptic nerve terminals regulate neurotransmitter release. However, there is no evidence for the expression of nAChRs in synaptic vesicles, which deliver neurotransmitter to synaptic cleft. The aim of this paper was to investigate the presence of nAChRs in synaptic vesicles purified from the rat brain and to study their possible involvement in vesicles life cycle. According to dynamic light scattering analysis, the antibody against extracellular domain (1-208) of α7 nAChR subunit inhibited synaptic vesicles clustering. Sandwich ELISA with nAChR subunit-specific antibodies demonstrated the presence of α4ß2, α7 and α7ß2nAChR subtypes in synaptic vesicles and showed that α7 and ß2 nAChR subunits are co-localized with synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A). Pre-incubation with either α7-selective agonist PNU282987 or nicotine did not affect synaptic vesicles clustering but delayed their Ca2+-dependent fusion with the plasma membranes. In contrast, nicotine but not PNU282987 stimulated acidification of isolated synaptic vesicles, indicating that α4ß2 but not α7-containing nAChRs are involved in regulation of proton influx and neurotransmitter refilling. Treatment of rats with levetiracetam, a specific modulator of SV2A, increased the content of α7 nAChRs in synaptic vesicles accompanied by increased clustering but decreased Ca2+-dependent fusion. These data for the first time demonstrate the presence of nAChRs in synaptic vesicles and suggest an active involvement of cholinergic regulation in neurotransmitter release. Synaptic vesicles may be an additional target of nicotine inhaled upon smoking and of α7-specific drugs widely discussed as anti-inflammatory and pro-cognitive tools.


Subject(s)
Brain/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Membrane Fusion/physiology , Synaptic Vesicles/metabolism , alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor/metabolism , Animals , Brain/drug effects , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Female , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Male , Membrane Fusion/drug effects , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Nicotinic Agonists/pharmacology , Nicotinic Antagonists/pharmacology , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Synaptic Vesicles/drug effects , alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor/agonists , alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors
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