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1.
Arch Virol ; 166(8): 2285-2289, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826502

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered multipotent progenitors with the capacity to differentiate into mesoderm-like cells in many species. The immunosuppressive properties of MSCs are important for downregulating inflammatory responses. Turkey coronavirus (TCoV) is the etiological agent of a poult mortality syndrome that affects intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, poult MSCs were isolated, characterized, and infected with TCoV after in vitro culture. The poult-derived MSCs showed fibroblast-like morphology and the ability to undergo differentiation into mesodermal-derived cells and to support virus replication. Infection with TCoV resulted in cytopathic effects and the loss of cell viability. TCoV antigens and new viral progeny were detected at high levels, as were transcripts of the pro-inflammatory factors INFγ, IL-6, and IL-8. These findings suggest that the cytokine storm phenomenon is not restricted to one genus of the family Coronaviridae and that MSCs cannot always balance the process.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus, Turkey/physiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Virus Replication , Animals , Cell Differentiation , Cell Survival , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Interleukin-8/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/virology , Turkeys , Up-Regulation
2.
ACS Appl Bio Mater ; 5(2): 483-491, 2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1805546

ABSTRACT

Interleukin-mediated deep cytokine storm, an aggressive inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 virus infection in COVID-19 patients, is correlated directly with lung injury, multi-organ failure, and poor prognosis of severe COVID-19 patients. Curcumin (CUR), a phenolic antioxidant compound obtained from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), is well-known for its strong anti-inflammatory activity. However, its in vivo efficacy is constrained due to poor bioavailability. Herein, we report that CUR-encapsulated polysaccharide nanoparticles (CUR-PS-NPs) potently inhibit the release of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors associated with damage of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (CoV2-SP)-stimulated liver Huh7.5 and lung A549 epithelial cells. Treatment with CUR-PS-NPs effectively attenuated the interaction of ACE2 and CoV2-SP. The effects of CUR-PS-NPs were linked to reduced NF-κB/MAPK signaling which in turn decreased CoV2-SP-mediated phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, p42/44 MAPK, and p65/NF-κB as well as nuclear p65/NF-κB expression. The findings of the study strongly indicate that organic NPs of CUR can be used to control hyper-inflammatory responses and prevent lung and liver injuries associated with CoV2-SP-mediated cytokine storm.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Curcumin/pharmacology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacokinetics , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chemokines/biosynthesis , Curcumin/chemistry , Curcumin/pharmacokinetics , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Humans , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/biosynthesis , Phosphorylation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology
3.
Appl Radiat Isot ; 184: 110157, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787999

ABSTRACT

According to the National Institute of Public Health, prostate cancer (PCa) is the leading cause of cancer death in Mexican men, highly associated with aggressiveness, resistance to treatment, and metastatic spread (Bharti et al., 2019) mediated by activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the participation of HIF-1α activation in the radiobiological response of the human prostate adenocarcinoma cell line LNCaP, describing the phenomena with a mathematical model. Four groups were formed under different exposure conditions, including hypoxic cells treated with CoCl2 (300 µM for 22 h) with or without hypoxia-inducible factor inhibitor (150 nM chetomin for 4 h added after an incubation period of 18 h with CoCl2, just before completing the incubation period of 22 h). They were exposed to a source of 60Co in a dose range between 2 and 10 Gy to obtain survival curves that are fitted to a mathematical model. CoCl2 or chetomin treatments do not affect the viability of LNCaP cells that remained unchanged after irradiation. CoCl2 induced hypoxia reduces the survivability of LNCaP, and obstruction of HIF-1α signaling with chetomine produces a slight radioprotective effect. As others report, the genetic reprogramming induced by HIF-1α activation acts as an intrinsic agent that selects cells with more aggressive behavior (Pressley et al., 2017), while chetomin protects cells from death due to its scavenger properties. Interestingly, treatment with chetomin of cells induced to hypoxia (HIF-1 activation with CoCl2) produces a significant reduction in the radioresistance of LNCaP cells, demonstrating that the simultaneous use of chetomin and gamma radiation is an effective option for the treatment of hypoxic prostate cancer. At the molecular level, we suggest that the selective force exerted by HIF-1α depends on the production of free radicals by radiation. The proposed mathematical model showed that the rate of change in cell survival as a function of radiation dose is proportional to the product of two functions, one that describes cell death and the other that describes natural or artificial resistance to radiation.


Subject(s)
Prostatic Neoplasms , Signal Transduction , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Survival , Humans , Hypoxia , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/pharmacology , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/metabolism , Prostatic Neoplasms/radiotherapy
4.
Med Sci (Basel) ; 10(1)2022 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760773

ABSTRACT

Autophagy is a known mechanism of cells under internal stress that regulates cellular function via internal protein recycling and the cleaning up of debris, leading to healthy live cells. However, the stimulation of autophagy by external factors such as chemical compounds or viral infection mostly tends to induce apoptosis/cell death. This study hypothesizes that manipulation of the autophagy mechanism to the pro-cell survival and/or decreased pro-viral niche can be a strategy for effective antiviral and anticancer treatment. Cells susceptible to viral infection, namely LLC-MK2, normal monkey epithelium, and K562, human immune-related lymphocyte, which is also a cancer cell line, were treated with fludarabine nucleoside analog (Fdb), interferon alpha (IFN-α), and a combination of Fdb and IFN-α, and then were evaluated for signs of adaptive autophagy and STAT1 antiviral signaling by Western blotting and immunolabeling assays. The results showed that the low concentration of Fdb was able to activate an autophagy response in both cell types, as demonstrated by the intense immunostaining of LC3B foci in the autophagosomes of living cells. Treatment with IFN-α (10 U/mL) showed no alteration in the initiator of mTOR autophagy but dramatically increased the intracellular STAT1 signaling molecules in both cell types. Although in the combined Fdb and IFN-α treatment, both LLC-MK2 and K562 cells showed only slight changes in the autophagy-responsive proteins p-mTOR and LC3B, an adaptive autophagy event was clearly shown in the autophagosome of the LLC-MK2 cell, suggesting the survival phase of the normal cell. The combined effect of Fdb and IFN-α treatment on the antiviral response was identified by the level of activation of the STAT1 antiviral marker. Significantly, the adaptive autophagy mediated by Fdb was able to suppress the IFN-α-mediated pSTAT1 signaling in both cell types to a level that is appropriate for cellular function. It is concluded that the administration of an appropriate dose of Fdb and IFN-α in combination is beneficial for the treatment of some types of cancer and viral infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , Interferon-alpha , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Autophagy , Cell Survival , Humans , Interferon-alpha/pharmacology , K562 Cells , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases , Vidarabine/analogs & derivatives
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(6)2022 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742489

ABSTRACT

The pandemic emergency determined by the spreading worldwide of the SARS-CoV-2 virus has focused the scientific and economic efforts of the pharmaceutical industry and governments on the possibility to fight the virus by genetic immunization. The genetic material must be delivered inside the cells by means of vectors. Due to the risk of adverse or immunogenic reaction or replication connected with the more efficient viral vectors, non-viral vectors are in many cases considered as a preferred strategy for gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. This paper is devoted to the evaluation of the gene delivery ability of new synthesized gemini bis-pyridinium surfactants with six methylene spacers, both hydrogenated and fluorinated, in comparison with compounds with spacers of different lengths, previously studied. Results from MTT proliferation assay, electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), transient transfection assay tests and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging confirm that pyridinium gemini surfactants could be a valuable tool for gene delivery purposes, but their performance is highly dependent on the spacer length and strictly related to their structure in solution. All the fluorinated compounds are unable to transfect RD-4 cells, if used alone, but they are all able to deliver a plasmid carrying an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression cassette, when co-formulated with 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) in a 1:2 ratio. The fluorinated compounds with spacers formed by six (FGP6) and eight carbon atoms (FGP8) give rise to a very interesting gene delivery activity, greater to that of the commercial reagent, when formulated with DOPE. The hydrogenated compound GP16_6 is unable to sufficiently compact the DNA, as shown by AFM images.


Subject(s)
DNA/genetics , Gene Transfer Techniques , Methane/chemistry , Pyridinium Compounds/chemistry , Surface-Active Agents/chemistry , Transfection/methods , A549 Cells , Cell Survival , DNA/chemistry , DNA/metabolism , Genetic Therapy/methods , Halogenation , Humans , Hydrogenation , Methane/metabolism , Microscopy, Atomic Force , Molecular Structure , Plasmids/chemistry , Plasmids/genetics , Plasmids/metabolism , Pyridinium Compounds/metabolism , Reproducibility of Results , Surface-Active Agents/metabolism
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(5)2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732066

ABSTRACT

The endogenous protease furin is a key protein in many different diseases, such as cancer and infections. For this reason, a wide range of studies has focused on targeting furin from a therapeutic point of view. Our main objective consisted of identifying new compounds that could enlarge the furin inhibitor arsenal; secondarily, we assayed their adjuvant effect in combination with a known furin inhibitor, CMK, which avoids the SARS-CoV-2 S protein cleavage by means of that inhibition. Virtual screening was carried out to identify potential furin inhibitors. The inhibition of physiological and purified recombinant furin by screening selected compounds, Clexane, and these drugs in combination with CMK was assayed in fluorogenic tests by using a specific furin substrate. The effects of the selected inhibitors from virtual screening on cell viability (293T HEK cell line) were assayed by means of flow cytometry. Through virtual screening, Zeaxanthin and Kukoamine A were selected as the main potential furin inhibitors. In fluorogenic assays, these two compounds and Clexane inhibited both physiological and recombinant furin in a dose-dependent way. In addition, these compounds increased physiological furin inhibition by CMK, showing an adjuvant effect. In conclusion, we identified Kukoamine A, Zeaxanthin, and Clexane as new furin inhibitors. In addition, these drugs were able to increase furin inhibition by CMK, so they could also increase its efficiency when avoiding S protein proteolysis, which is essential for SARS-CoV-2 cell infection.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Chloromethyl Ketones/pharmacology , Enoxaparin/pharmacology , Furin/antagonists & inhibitors , Spermine/analogs & derivatives , Zeaxanthins/pharmacology , Amino Acid Chloromethyl Ketones/chemistry , Amino Acid Chloromethyl Ketones/metabolism , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Survival/drug effects , Enoxaparin/chemistry , Enoxaparin/metabolism , Furin/chemistry , Furin/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Structure , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Proteolysis , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spermine/chemistry , Spermine/metabolism , Spermine/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication , Zeaxanthins/chemistry , Zeaxanthins/metabolism
7.
Front Immunol ; 13: 841459, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731786

ABSTRACT

In late 2019, COVID-19 emerged in Wuhan, China. Currently, it is an ongoing global health threat stressing the need for therapeutic compounds. Linking the virus life cycle and its interaction with cell receptors and internal cellular machinery is key to developing therapies based on the control of infectivity and inflammation. In this framework, we evaluate the combination of cannabidiol (CBD), as an anti-inflammatory molecule, and terpenes, by their anti-microbiological properties, in reducing SARS-CoV-2 infectivity. Our group settled six formulations combining CBD and terpenes purified from Cannabis sativa L, Origanum vulgare, and Thymus mastichina. The formulations were analyzed by HPLC and GC-MS and evaluated for virucide and antiviral potential by in vitro studies in alveolar basal epithelial, colon, kidney, and keratinocyte human cell lines. Conclusions and Impact: We demonstrate the virucide effectiveness of CBD and terpene-based formulations. F2TC reduces the infectivity by 17%, 24%, and 99% for CaCo-2, HaCat, and A549, respectively, and F1TC by 43%, 37%, and 29% for Hek293T, HaCaT, and Caco-2, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first approach that tackles the combination of CBD with a specific group of terpenes against SARS-CoV-2 in different cell lines. The differential effectiveness of formulations according to the cell line can be relevant to understanding the pattern of virus infectivity and the host inflammation response, and lead to new therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cannabidiol/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Terpenes/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Cannabidiol/chemistry , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Drug Synergism , Humans , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Terpenes/chemistry , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
8.
Mol Cell Biochem ; 477(6): 1681-1695, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718850

ABSTRACT

A significantly high percentage of hospitalized COVID-19 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) had severe conditions and were admitted to ICU. In this review, we have delineated the plausible molecular mechanisms that could explain why there are increased clinical complications in patients with DM that become critically ill when infected with SARS-CoV2. RNA viruses have been classically implicated in manifestation of new onset diabetes. SARS-CoV2 infection through cytokine storm leads to elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines creating an imbalance in the functioning of T helper cells affecting multiple organs. Inflammation and Th1/Th2 cell imbalance along with Th17 have been associated with DM, which can exacerbate SARS-CoV2 infection severity. ACE-2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas axis positively modulates ß-cell and cardiac tissue function and survival. However, ACE-2 receptors dock SARS-CoV2, which internalize and deplete ACE-2 and activate Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) pathway. This induces inflammation promoting insulin resistance that has positive effect on RAS pathway, causes ß-cell dysfunction, promotes inflammation and increases the risk of cardiovascular complications. Further, hyperglycemic state could upregulate ACE-2 receptors for viral infection thereby increasing the severity of the diabetic condition. SARS-CoV2 infection in diabetic patients with heart conditions are linked to worse outcomes. SARS-CoV2 can directly affect cardiac tissue or inflammatory response during diabetic condition and worsen the underlying heart conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Diabetes Mellitus , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19/complications , Cell Survival , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Humans , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2145, 2022 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692555

ABSTRACT

The most common host entry point of human adapted coronaviruses (CoV) including SARS-CoV-2 is through the initial colonization in the nostril and mouth region which is responsible for spread of the infection. Most recent studies suggest that the commercially available oral and nasal rinse products are effective in inhibiting the viral replication. However, the anti-viral mechanism of the active ingredients present in the oral rinses have not been studied. In the present study, we have assessed in vitro enzymatic inhibitory activity of active ingredients in the oral mouth rinse products: aloin A and B, chlorhexidine, eucalyptol, hexetidine, menthol, triclosan, methyl salicylate, sodium fluoride and povidone, against two important proteases of SARS-CoV-2 PLpro and 3CLpro. Our results indicate only aloin A and B effectively inhibited proteolytic activity of PLpro with an IC50 of 13.16 and 16.08 µM. Interestingly, neither of the aloin isoforms inhibited 3CLpro enzymatic activity. Computational structural modelling of aloin A and B interaction with PLpro revealed that, both aloin isoforms form hydrogen bond with Tyr268 of PLpro, which is critical for their proteolytic activity. Furthermore, 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies predicted that both aloin isoforms have strong interaction with Glu167, which is required for PLpro deubiquitination activity. Our results from the in vitro deubiquitinase inhibition assay show that aloin A and B isomers exhibit deubiquitination inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 15.68 and 17.51 µM, respectively. In conclusion, the isoforms of aloin inhibit both proteolytic and the deubiquitinating activity of SARS-CoV-2 PLpro, suggesting potential in inhibiting the replication of SARS-CoV-2 virus.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Emodin/analogs & derivatives , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Emodin/chemistry , Emodin/metabolism , Emodin/pharmacology , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Isoforms/chemistry , Protein Isoforms/metabolism , Protein Isoforms/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vero Cells
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(4)2022 Feb 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686819

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has evidenced the urgent need for the discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral therapies that could be deployed in the case of future emergence of novel viral threats, as well as to back up current therapeutic options in the case of drug resistance development. Most current antivirals are directed to inhibit specific viruses since these therapeutic molecules are designed to act on a specific viral target with the objective of interfering with a precise step in the replication cycle. Therefore, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been identified as promising antiviral agents that could help to overcome this limitation and provide compounds able to act on more than a single viral family. We evaluated the antiviral activity of an amphibian peptide known for its strong antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, namely Temporin L (TL). Previous studies have revealed that TL is endowed with widespread antimicrobial activity and possesses marked haemolytic activity. Therefore, we analyzed TL and a previously identified TL derivative (Pro3, DLeu9 TL, where glutamine at position 3 is replaced with proline, and the D-Leucine enantiomer is present at position 9) as well as its analogs, for their activity against a wide panel of viruses comprising enveloped, naked, DNA and RNA viruses. We report significant inhibition activity against herpesviruses, paramyxoviruses, influenza virus and coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, we further modified our best candidate by lipidation and demonstrated a highly reduced cytotoxicity with improved antiviral effect. Our results show a potent and selective antiviral activity of TL peptides, indicating that the novel lipidated temporin-based antiviral agents could prove to be useful additions to current drugs in combatting rising drug resistance and epidemic/pandemic emergencies.


Subject(s)
Amphibian Proteins/pharmacology , Amphibians/metabolism , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , DNA Viruses/drug effects , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Amino Acid Sequence , Amphibian Proteins/chemistry , Amphibian Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/chemistry , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects , Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects , Humans , Lipids/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vero Cells
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686815

ABSTRACT

Quantitative and functional analysis of mononuclear leukocyte populations is an invaluable tool to understand the role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of a disease. Cryopreservation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) is routinely used to guarantee similar experimental conditions. Immune cells react differently to cryopreservation, and populations and functions of immune cells change during the process of freeze-thawing. To allow for a setup that preserves cell number and function optimally, we tested four different cryopreservation media. MNCs from 15 human individuals were analyzed. Before freezing and after thawing, the distribution of leukocytes was quantified by flow cytometry. Cultured cells were stimulated using lipopolysaccharide, and their immune response was quantified by flow cytometry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ultimately, the performance of the cryopreservation media was ranked. Cell recovery and viability were different between the media. Cryopreservation led to changes in the relative number of monocytes, T cells, B cells, and their subsets. The inflammatory response of MNCs was altered by cryopreservation, enhancing the basal production of inflammatory cytokines. Different cryopreservation media induce biases, which needs to be considered when designing a study relying on cryopreservation. Here, we provide an overview of four different cryopreservation media for choosing the optimal medium for a specific task.


Subject(s)
Cell Culture Techniques/methods , Cryopreservation/methods , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Cell Survival , Cells, Cultured , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Male
12.
Life Sci ; 295: 120411, 2022 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683412

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Virus-infected host cells switch their metabolism to a more glycolytic phenotype, required for new virion synthesis and packaging. Therefore, we investigated the effect and mechanistic action of glycolytic inhibitor 2-Deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) on virus multiplication in host cells following SARS-CoV-2 infection. MAIN METHODS: SARS-CoV-2 induced change in glycolysis was examined in Vero E6 cells. Effect of 2-DG on virus multiplication was evaluated by RT-PCR (N and RdRp genes) analysis, protein expression analysis of Nucleocapsid (N) and Spike (S) proteins and visual indication of cytopathy effect (CPE), The mass spectrometry analysis was performed to examine the 2-DG induced change in glycosylation status of receptor binding domain (RBD) in SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. KEY FINDINGS: We observed SARS-COV-2 infection induced increased glucose influx and glycolysis, resulting in selectively high accumulation of the fluorescent glucose analog, 2-NBDG in Vero E6 cells. 2-DG inhibited glycolysis, reduced virus multiplication and alleviated cells from virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) in SARS-CoV-2 infected cells. The progeny virions produced from 2-DG treated cells were found unglycosylated at crucial N-glycosites (N331 and N343) of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the spike protein, resulting in production of defective progeny virions with compromised infective potential. SIGNIFICANCE: The mechanistic study revealed that the inhibition of SARS-COV-2 multiplication is attributed to 2-DG induced glycolysis inhibition and possibly un-glycosylation of the spike protein, also. Therefore, based on its previous human trials in different types of Cancer and Herpes patients, it could be a potential molecule to study in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Deoxyglucose/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Glucose/metabolism , Glycolysis/drug effects , Glycosylation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Mannose/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virion/drug effects , Virion/pathogenicity , Virus Replication/drug effects
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Jan 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650418

ABSTRACT

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome is the most common cause of respiratory failure among critically ill patients, and its importance has been heightened during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even with the best supportive care, the mortality rate in the most severe cases is 40-50%, and the only pharmacological agent shown to be of possible benefit has been steroids. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been tested in several pre-clinical models of lung injury and been found to have significant therapeutic benefit related to: (a) potent immunomodulation; (b) secretion of epithelial and endothelial growth factors; and (c) augmentation of host defense to infection. Initial translational efforts have shown signs of promise, but the results have not yielded the anticipated outcomes. One potential reason is the relatively low survival of MSCs in inflammatory conditions as shown in several studies. Therefore, strategies to boost the survival of MSCs are needed to enhance their therapeutic effect. Protease-activated receptors (PARs) may represent one such possibility as they are G-protein coupled receptors expressed by MSCs and control several facets of cell behavior. This review summarizes some of the existing literature about PARs and MSCs and presents possible future areas of investigation in order to develop potential, PAR-modified MSCs with enhanced therapeutic efficiency.


Subject(s)
Graft Survival/genetics , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Receptors, Proteinase-Activated/physiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cell Survival/genetics , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Receptors, Proteinase-Activated/genetics , Receptors, Proteinase-Activated/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/physiology , Transfection , Treatment Outcome
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(2)2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637017

ABSTRACT

Malignant melanoma is still a serious medical problem. Relatively high mortality, a still-growing number of newly diagnosed cases, and insufficiently effective methods of therapy necessitate melanoma research. Tetracyclines are compounds with pleiotropic pharmacological properties. Previously published studies on melanotic melanoma cells ascertained that minocycline and doxycycline exerted an anti-melanoma effect. The purpose of the study was to assess the anti-melanoma potential and mechanisms of action of minocycline and doxycycline using A375 and C32 human amelanotic melanoma cell lines. The obtained results indicate that the tested drugs inhibited proliferation, decreased cell viability, and induced apoptosis in amelanotic melanoma cells. The treatment caused changes in the cell cycle profile and decreased the intracellular level of reduced thiols and mitochondrial membrane potential. The exposure of A375 and C32 cells to minocycline and doxycycline triggered the release of cytochrome c and activated initiator and effector caspases. The anti-melanoma effect of analyzed drugs appeared to be related to the up-regulation of ERK1/2 and MITF. Moreover, it was noticed that minocycline and doxycycline increased the level of LC3A/B, an autophagy marker, in A375 cells. In summary, the study showed the pleiotropic anti-cancer action of minocycline and doxycycline against amelanotic melanoma cells. Considering all results, it could be concluded that doxycycline was a more potent drug than minocycline.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Doxycycline/pharmacology , Minocycline/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Autophagy/drug effects , Biomarkers, Tumor , Caspases/metabolism , Cell Cycle/drug effects , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation , Cell Survival/drug effects , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Melanoma, Amelanotic , Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial/drug effects
15.
Med Oncol ; 39(3): 32, 2022 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633699

ABSTRACT

To investigate the effects of isolated SARS-CoV-2 spike protein on prostate cancer cell survival. The effects of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein on LNCaP prostate cancer cell survival were assessed using clonogenic cell survival assay, quick cell proliferation assay, and caspase-3 activity kits. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms. SARS-CoV-2 spike protein was found to inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation as well as promote apoptosis. Further investigation revealed that anti-proliferative effects were associated with downregulation of the pro-proliferative molecule cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). The increased rate of apoptosis was associated with the upregulation of pro-apoptotic molecule Fas ligand (FasL). SARS-CoV-2 spike protein inhibits the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in vitro by a two-pronged approach of downregulating the expression of CDK4 and upregulating FasL. The introduction of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein into the body via COVID-19 vaccination may have the potential to inhibit prostate cancer in patients. This potential beneficial association between COVID-19 vaccines and prostate cancer inhibition will require more extensive studies before any conclusions can be drawn about any in vivo effects in a human model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cell Proliferation/physiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/immunology , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Apoptosis/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Survival/immunology , Down-Regulation/immunology , Humans , Male , Up-Regulation/immunology , Vaccination/methods
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(2)2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625084

ABSTRACT

Viral infections represent a serious threat to the world population and are becoming more frequent. The search and identification of broad-spectrum antiviral molecules is necessary to ensure new therapeutic options, since there is a limited availability of effective antiviral drugs able to eradicate viral infections, and consequently due to the increase of strains that are resistant to the most used drugs. Recently, several studies on antimicrobial peptides identified them as promising antiviral agents. In detail, amphibian skin secretions serve as a rich source of natural antimicrobial peptides. Their antibacterial and antifungal activities have been widely reported, but their exploitation as potential antiviral agents have yet to be fully investigated. In the present study, the antiviral activity of the peptide derived from the secretion of Rana tagoi, named AR-23, was evaluated against both DNA and RNA viruses, with or without envelope. Different assays were performed to identify in which step of the infectious cycle the peptide could act. AR-23 exhibited a greater inhibitory activity in the early stages of infection against both DNA (HSV-1) and RNA (MeV, HPIV-2, HCoV-229E, and SARS-CoV-2) enveloped viruses and, on the contrary, it was inactive against naked viruses (PV-1). Altogether, the results indicated AR-23 as a peptide with potential therapeutic effects against a wide variety of human viruses.


Subject(s)
Amphibian Proteins/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Ranidae/metabolism , Animals , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , DNA Viruses/drug effects , RNA Viruses/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vero Cells , Viral Envelope/drug effects , Viral Plaque Assay , Virus Diseases/drug therapy
17.
Viruses ; 14(1)2022 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614009

ABSTRACT

Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) employs a photosensitizer, light, and oxygen to create a local burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can inactivate microorganisms. The botanical extract PhytoQuinTM is a powerful photosensitizer with antimicrobial properties. We previously demonstrated that photoactivated PhytoQuin also has antiviral properties against herpes simplex viruses and adenoviruses in a dose-dependent manner across a broad range of sub-cytotoxic concentrations. Here, we report that human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are also susceptible to photodynamic inactivation. Photoactivated-PhytoQuin inhibited the replication of the alphacoronavirus HCoV-229E and the betacoronavirus HCoV-OC43 in cultured cells across a range of sub-cytotoxic doses. This antiviral effect was light-dependent, as we observed minimal antiviral effect of PhytoQuin in the absence of photoactivation. Using RNase protection assays, we observed that PDI disrupted HCoV particle integrity allowing for the digestion of viral RNA by exogenous ribonucleases. Using lentiviruses pseudotyped with the SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) protein, we once again observed a strong, light-dependent antiviral effect of PhytoQuin, which prevented S-mediated entry into human cells. We also observed that PhytoQuin PDI altered S protein electrophoretic mobility. The PhytoQuin constituent emodin displayed equivalent light-dependent antiviral activity to PhytoQuin in matched-dose experiments, indicating that it plays a central role in PhytoQuin PDI against CoVs. Together, these findings demonstrate that HCoV lipid envelopes and proteins are damaged by PhytoQuin PDI and expands the list of susceptible viruses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus/drug effects , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/radiation effects , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cricetinae , Emodin/pharmacology , Emodin/radiation effects , Humans , Light , Photosensitizing Agents/radiation effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/radiation effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/drug effects , Virion/drug effects
18.
Viruses ; 14(1)2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614008

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), has spread worldwide, affecting over 250 million people and resulting in over five million deaths. Antivirals that are effective are still limited. The antiviral activities of the Petasites hybdridus CO2 extract Ze 339 were previously reported. Thus, to assess the anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity of Ze 339 as well as isopetasin and neopetasin as major active compounds, a CPE and plaque reduction assay in Vero E6 cells was used for viral output. Antiviral effects were tested using the original virus (Wuhan) and the Delta variant of SARS-CoV-2. The antiviral drug remdesivir was used as control. Pre-treatment with Ze 339 in SARS-CoV-2-infected Vero E6 cells with either virus variant significantly inhibited virus replication with IC50 values of 0.10 and 0.40 µg/mL, respectively. The IC50 values obtained for isopetasin ranged between 0.37 and 0.88 µM for both virus variants, and that of remdesivir ranged between 1.53 and 2.37 µM. In conclusion, Ze 339 as well as the petasins potently inhibited SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro of the Wuhan and Delta variants. Since time is of essence in finding effective treatments, clinical studies will have to demonstrate if Ze339 can become a therapeutic option to treat SARS-CoV-2 infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Carbon Dioxide/chemistry , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Genetic Variation , Petasites/chemistry , Plant Extracts/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sesquiterpenes/chemistry , Sesquiterpenes/pharmacology , Vero Cells
19.
J Med Chem ; 65(1): 876-884, 2022 01 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606194

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a global health threat, was caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The SARS-CoV-2 papain-like cysteine protease (PLpro) was recognized as a promising drug target because of multiple functions in virus maturation and antiviral immune responses. Inhibitor GRL0617 occupied the interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) C-terminus-binding pocket and showed an effective antiviral inhibition. Here, we described a novel peptide-drug conjugate (PDC), in which GRL0617 was linked to a sulfonium-tethered peptide derived from PLpro-specific substrate LRGG. The EM-C and EC-M PDCs showed a promising in vitro IC50 of 7.40 ± 0.37 and 8.63 ± 0.55 µM, respectively. EC-M could covalently label PLpro active site C111 and display anti-ISGylation activities in cellular assays. The results represent the first attempt to design PDCs composed of stabilized peptide inhibitors and GRL0617 to inhibit PLpro. These novel PDCs provide promising opportunities for antiviral drug design.


Subject(s)
Aniline Compounds/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Benzamides/chemistry , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Drug Design , Naphthalenes/chemistry , Peptides/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Aniline Compounds/metabolism , Aniline Compounds/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Benzamides/metabolism , Benzamides/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Cytokines/chemistry , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Humans , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , Naphthalenes/metabolism , Naphthalenes/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Ubiquitins/chemistry
20.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(1): 333-349, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591186

ABSTRACT

A promising approach to tackle the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) could be small interfering (si)RNAs. So far it is unclear, which viral replication steps can be efficiently inhibited with siRNAs. Here, we report that siRNAs can target genomic RNA (gRNA) of SARS-CoV-2 after cell entry, and thereby terminate replication before start of transcription and prevent virus-induced cell death. Coronaviruses replicate via negative sense RNA intermediates using a unique discontinuous transcription process. As a result, each viral RNA contains identical sequences at the 5' and 3' end. Surprisingly, siRNAs were not active against intermediate negative sense transcripts. Targeting common sequences shared by all viral transcripts allowed simultaneous suppression of gRNA and subgenomic (sg)RNAs by a single siRNA. The most effective suppression of viral replication and spread, however, was achieved by siRNAs that targeted open reading frame 1 (ORF1) which only exists in gRNA. In contrast, siRNAs that targeted the common regions of transcripts were outcompeted by the highly abundant sgRNAs leading to an impaired antiviral efficacy. Verifying the translational relevance of these findings, we show that a chemically modified siRNA that targets a highly conserved region of ORF1, inhibited SARS-CoV-2 replication ex vivo in explants of the human lung. Our work encourages the development of siRNA-based therapies for COVID-19 and suggests that early therapy start, or prophylactic application, together with specifically targeting gRNA, might be key for high antiviral efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Lung/virology , RNA, Small Interfering , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Replication , 3' Untranslated Regions , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Survival , Databases, Genetic , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Nucleic Acid Conformation , Oligonucleotides , Open Reading Frames , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism
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