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1.
Med Sci (Paris) ; 37(11): 1062-1065, 2021 Nov.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545680

ABSTRACT

The elimination of some senescent cells by « senolytic ¼ compounds can greatly improve the health of aged mice and in some cases reverse the effects of aging. Using a microbial exposure system that closely models coronavirus infection, it is possible to largely protect old mice from the effects of viral infection. This immediately suggests clinical application of the approach, and is the aim of ongoing phase II clinical trials in Covid-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cellular Senescence , Aging/drug effects , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Humans , Mice , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(23)2021 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542580

ABSTRACT

The skin, being the barrier organ of the body, is constitutively exposed to various stimuli impacting its morphology and function. Senescent cells have been found to accumulate with age and may contribute to age-related skin changes and pathologies. Natural polyphenols exert many health benefits, including ameliorative effects on skin aging. By affecting molecular pathways of senescence, polyphenols are able to prevent or delay the senescence formation and, consequently, avoid or ameliorate aging and age-associated pathologies of the skin. This review aims to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge in skin aging and cellular senescence, and to summarize the recent in vitro studies related to the anti-senescent mechanisms of natural polyphenols carried out on keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts. Aged skin in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic will be also discussed.


Subject(s)
Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Cellular Senescence/physiology , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Skin Aging/drug effects , Skin Aging/physiology , Aging/physiology , COVID-19 , Fibroblasts , Humans , Keratinocytes , Melanocytes , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin/pathology , Skin Aging/pathology
3.
Nature ; 599(7884): 283-289, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404888

ABSTRACT

Derailed cytokine and immune cell networks account for the organ damage and the clinical severity of COVID-19 (refs. 1-4). Here we show that SARS-CoV-2, like other viruses, evokes cellular senescence as a primary stress response in infected cells. Virus-induced senescence (VIS) is indistinguishable from other forms of cellular senescence and is accompanied by a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which comprises pro-inflammatory cytokines, extracellular-matrix-active factors and pro-coagulatory mediators5-7. Patients with COVID-19 displayed markers of senescence in their airway mucosa in situ and increased serum levels of SASP factors. In vitro assays demonstrated macrophage activation with SASP-reminiscent secretion, complement lysis and SASP-amplifying secondary senescence of endothelial cells, which mirrored hallmark features of COVID-19 such as macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, endothelial damage and widespread thrombosis in affected lung tissue1,8,9. Moreover, supernatant from VIS cells, including SARS-CoV-2-induced senescence, induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation and activation of platelets and the clotting cascade. Senolytics such as navitoclax and a combination of dasatinib plus quercetin selectively eliminated VIS cells, mitigated COVID-19-reminiscent lung disease and reduced inflammation in SARS-CoV-2-infected hamsters and mice. Our findings mark VIS as a pathogenic trigger of COVID-19-related cytokine escalation and organ damage, and suggest that senolytic targeting of virus-infected cells is a treatment option against SARS-CoV-2 and perhaps other viral infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Molecular Targeted Therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aniline Compounds/pharmacology , Aniline Compounds/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Cell Line , Cricetinae , Dasatinib/pharmacology , Dasatinib/therapeutic use , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Quercetin/pharmacology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/metabolism
4.
Cancer Genomics Proteomics ; 18(5): 661-673, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395533

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) poses a great challenge for the treatment of cancer patients. It presents as a severe respiratory infection in aged individuals, including some lung cancer patients. COVID-19 may be linked to the progression of aggressive lung cancer. In addition, the side effects of chemotherapy, such as chemotherapy resistance and the acceleration of cellular senescence, can worsen COVID-19. Given this situation, we investigated the role of paclitaxel (a chemotherapy drug) in the cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cellular senescence of gefitinib-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells (PC9-MET) to clarify the underlying mechanisms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PC9-MET cells were treated with paclitaxel for 72 h and then evaluated by a cell viability assay, DAPI staining, Giemsa staining, apoptosis assay, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay, SA-ß-Gal staining, a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay and Western blotting. RESULTS: Paclitaxel significantly reduced the viability of PC9-MET cells and induced morphological signs of apoptosis. The apoptotic effects of paclitaxel were observed by increased levels of cleaved caspase-3 (Asp 175), cleaved caspase-9 (Asp 330) and cleaved PARP (Asp 214). In addition, paclitaxel increased ROS production, leading to DNA damage. Inhibition of ROS production by N-acetylcysteine attenuates paclitaxel-induced DNA damage. Importantly, paclitaxel eliminated cellular senescence, as observed by SA-ß-Gal staining. Cellular senescence elimination was associated with p53/p21 and p16/pRb signaling inactivation. CONCLUSION: Paclitaxel may be a promising anticancer drug and offer a new therapeutic strategy for managing gefitinib-resistant NSCLC during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/drug effects , Gefitinib/pharmacology , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Paclitaxel/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/metabolism , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects
5.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(11): 3023-3033, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367342

ABSTRACT

The burden of senescent cells (SnCs), which do not divide but are metabolically active and resistant to death by apoptosis, is increased in older adults and those with chronic diseases. These individuals are also at the greatest risk for morbidity and mortality from SARS-CoV-2 infection. SARS-CoV-2 complications include cytokine storm and multiorgan failure mediated by the same factors as often produced by SnCs through their senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). The SASP can be amplified by infection-related pathogen-associated molecular profile factors. Senolytic agents, such as Fisetin, selectively eliminate SnCs and delay, prevent, or alleviate multiple disorders in aged experimental animals and animal models of human chronic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and respiratory diseases. Senolytics are now in clinical trials for multiple conditions linked to SnCs, including frailty; obesity/diabetes; osteoporosis; and cardiovascular, kidney, and lung diseases, which are also risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 morbidity and mortality. A clinical trial is underway to test if senolytics decrease SARS-CoV-2 progression and morbidity in hospitalized older adults. We describe here a National Institutes of Health-funded, multicenter, placebo-controlled clinical trial of Fisetin for older adult skilled nursing facility (SNF) residents who have been, or become, SARS-CoV-2 rtPCR-positive, including the rationale for targeting fundamental aging mechanisms in such patients. We consider logistic challenges of conducting trials in long-term care settings in the SARS-CoV-2 era, including restricted access, consent procedures, methods for obtaining biospecimens and clinical data, staffing, investigational product administration issues, and potential solutions for these challenges. We propose developing a national network of SNFs engaged in interventional clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Flavonols/therapeutic use , Skilled Nursing Facilities , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Trials as Topic , Drug Monitoring , Humans
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12787, 2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275960

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a pandemic affecting the most vulnerable in society, triggering a public health crisis and economic collapse around the world. Effective treatments to mitigate this viral infection are needed. Since the eye is a route of virus entrance, we use an in vivo rat model of corneal inflammation as well as human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) in culture challenged with IFNγ as models of the eye surface to study this issue. We explore ways to block the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) protein to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). We found that the lipid mediators, elovanoid (ELV)-N32 or Resolvin D6-isomer (RvD6i) decreased the expression of the ACE2 receptor, furin, and integrins in damaged corneas or IFNγ-stimulated HCEC. There was also a concomitant decrease in the binding of Spike RBD with the lipid treatments. Using RNA-seq analysis, we uncovered that the lipid mediators also attenuated the expression of pro-inflammatoy cytokines participating in hyper-inflammation and senescence programming. Thus, the bioactivity of these lipid mediators will contribute to open therapeutic avenues to counteract virus attachment and entrance to the body.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Corneal Injuries/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Docosahexaenoic Acids/analogs & derivatives , Docosahexaenoic Acids/pharmacology , Drug Discovery/methods , Protein Domains , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Disease Models, Animal , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelium, Corneal/cytology , Humans , Lipoxins/pharmacology , Male , Protein Binding , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Virus Attachment/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects
7.
Science ; 373(6552)2021 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262378

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the pronounced vulnerability of the elderly and chronically ill to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-induced morbidity and mortality. Cellular senescence contributes to inflammation, multiple chronic diseases, and age-related dysfunction, but effects on responses to viral infection are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that senescent cells (SnCs) become hyper-inflammatory in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), including SARS-CoV-2 spike protein-1, increasing expression of viral entry proteins and reducing antiviral gene expression in non-SnCs through a paracrine mechanism. Old mice acutely infected with pathogens that included a SARS-CoV-2-related mouse ß-coronavirus experienced increased senescence and inflammation, with nearly 100% mortality. Targeting SnCs by using senolytic drugs before or after pathogen exposure significantly reduced mortality, cellular senescence, and inflammatory markers and increased antiviral antibodies. Thus, reducing the SnC burden in diseased or aged individuals should enhance resilience and reduce mortality after viral infection, including that of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Aging , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Flavonols/therapeutic use , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Dasatinib/pharmacology , Dasatinib/therapeutic use , Female , Flavonols/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Murine hepatitis virus/immunology , Quercetin/pharmacology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Receptors, Coronavirus/genetics , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
8.
Cancer Treat Res Commun ; 28: 100399, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230425

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has triggered a sudden global change in healthcare systems. Cancer patients have a higher risk of death from COVID-19 in comparison to patients without cancer. Many studies have stated that various factors, such as older age, frequent exposure to healthcare, and higher smoking rates are responsible for the complications of COVID-19. We hypothesize that side effects of chemotherapy, such as cellular senescence, could worsen COVID-19. Given this situation, in this review, we highlight the updated findings of research investigating the impact of cellular senescence on COVID-19 complications and explored potential therapeutic targets for eliminating senescent cells during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Cellular Senescence/physiology , Neoplasms/pathology , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/virology
9.
J Intern Med ; 288(5): 518-536, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-657458

ABSTRACT

Senolytics are a class of drugs that selectively clear senescent cells (SC). The first senolytic drugs Dasatinib, Quercetin, Fisetin and Navitoclax were discovered using a hypothesis-driven approach. SC accumulate with ageing and at causal sites of multiple chronic disorders, including diseases accounting for the bulk of morbidity, mortality and health expenditures. The most deleterious SC are resistant to apoptosis and have up-regulation of anti-apoptotic pathways which defend SC against their own inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), allowing them to survive, despite killing neighbouring cells. Senolytics transiently disable these SCAPs, causing apoptosis of those SC with a tissue-destructive SASP. Because SC take weeks to reaccumulate, senolytics can be administered intermittently - a 'hit-and-run' approach. In preclinical models, senolytics delay, prevent or alleviate frailty, cancers and cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, liver, kidney, musculoskeletal, lung, eye, haematological, metabolic and skin disorders as well as complications of organ transplantation, radiation and cancer treatment. As anticipated for agents targeting the fundamental ageing mechanisms that are 'root cause' contributors to multiple disorders, potential uses of senolytics are protean, potentially alleviating over 40 conditions in preclinical studies, opening a new route for treating age-related dysfunction and diseases. Early pilot trials of senolytics suggest they decrease senescent cells, reduce inflammation and alleviate frailty in humans. Clinical trials for diabetes, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, Alzheimer's disease, COVID-19, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, eye diseases and bone marrow transplant and childhood cancer survivors are underway or beginning. Until such studies are done, it is too early for senolytics to be used outside of clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Development , Drug Discovery , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1472, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-643141

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has spread rapidly around the globe. However, despite its high pathogenicity and transmissibility, the severity of the associated disease, COVID-19, varies widely. While the prognosis is favorable in most patients, critical illness, manifested by respiratory distress, thromboembolism, shock, and multi-organ failure, has been reported in about 5% of cases. Several studies have associated poor COVID-19 outcomes with the exhaustion of natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells, lymphopenia, and elevated serum levels of D-dimer. In this article, we propose a common pathophysiological denominator for these negative prognostic markers, endogenous, angiotensin II toxicity. We hypothesize that, like in avian influenza, the outlook of COVID-19 is negatively correlated with the intracellular accumulation of angiotensin II promoted by the viral blockade of its degrading enzyme receptors. In this model, upregulated angiotensin II causes premature vascular senescence, leading to dysfunctional coagulation, and immunity. We further hypothesize that angiotensin II blockers and immune checkpoint inhibitors may be salutary for COVID-19 patients with critical illness by reversing both the clotting and immune defects (Graphical Abstract).


Subject(s)
Angiotensin II/blood , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Up-Regulation , Age Factors , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Brain/immunology , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Illness , Cytokines/metabolism , Dopamine/metabolism , Down-Regulation , Humans , Immunotherapy/methods , Mitochondria/metabolism , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Renin-Angiotensin System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Cytotherapy ; 22(8): 458-472, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-209852

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AIMS: Human platelet lysate can replace fetal bovine serum (FBS) for xeno-free ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), but pooling of platelet concentrates (PCs) increases risks of pathogen transmission. We evaluated the feasibility of performing nanofiltration of platelet lysates and determined the impact on expansion of bone marrow-derived MSCs. METHODS: Platelet lysates were prepared by freeze-thawing of pathogen-reduced (Intercept) PCs suspended in 65% storage solution (SPP+) and 35% plasma, and by serum-conversion of PCs suspended in 100% plasma. Lysates were added to the MSC growth media at 10% (v/v), filtered and subjected to cascade nanofiltration on 35- and 19-nm Planova filters. Media supplemented with 10% starting platelet lysates or FBS were used as the controls. Impacts of nanofiltration on the growth media composition, removal of platelet extracellular vesicles (PEVs) and MSC expansion were evaluated. RESULTS: Nanofiltration did not detrimentally affect contents of total protein and growth factors or the biochemical composition. The clearance factor of PEVs was >3 log values. Expansion, proliferation, membrane markers, differentiation potential and immunosuppressive properties of cells in nanofiltered media were consistently better than those expanded in FBS-supplemented media. Compared with FBS, chondrogenesis and osteogenesis genes were expressed more in nanofiltered media, and there were fewer senescent cells over six passages. CONCLUSIONS: Nanofiltration of growth media supplemented with two types of platelet lysates, including one prepared from pathogen-reduced PCs, is technically feasible. These data support the possibility of developing pathogen-reduced xeno-free growth media for clinical-grade propagation of human cells.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/cytology , Cell Culture Techniques/methods , Filtration , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Nanotechnology , Adipogenesis/drug effects , Biomarkers/metabolism , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Lineage/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Culture Media/pharmacology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/pharmacology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/drug effects , Osteogenesis/drug effects , Particle Size , Serum/chemistry
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