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2.
Interv Neuroradiol ; 26(5): 557-565, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455862

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Low-profile Visualized Intraluminal Support device (LVIS) has been successfully used to treat cerebral aneurysm, and the push-pull technique has been used clinically to compact the stent across aneurysm orifice. Our aim was to exhibit the hemodynamic effect of the compacted LVIS stent. METHODS: Two patient-specific aneurysm models were constructed from three-dimensional angiographic images. The uniform LVIS stent, compacted LVIS and Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) with or without coil embolization were virtually deployed into aneurysm models to perform hemodynamic analysis. Intra-aneurysmal flow parameters were calculated to assess hemodynamic differences among different models. RESULTS: The compacted LVIS had the highest metal coverage across the aneurysm orifice (case 1, 46.37%; case 2, 67.01%). However, the PED achieved the highest pore density (case 1, 19.56 pores/mm2; case 2, 18.07 pores/mm2). The compacted LVIS produced a much higher intra-aneurysmal flow reduction than the uniform LVIS. The PED showed a higher intra-aneurysmal flow reduction than the compacted LVIS in case 1, but the results were comparable in case 2. After stent placement, the intra-aneurysmal flow was further reduced as subsequent coil embolization. The compacted LVIS stent with coils produced a similar reduction in intra-aneurysmal flow to that of the PED. CONCLUSIONS: The combined characteristics of stent metal coverage and pore density should be considered when assessing the flow diversion effects of stents. More intra-aneurysmal flow reductions could be introduced by compacted LVIS stent than the uniform one. Compared with PED, compacted LVIS stent may exhibit a flow-diverting effect comparable to that of the PED.


Subject(s)
Embolization, Therapeutic/methods , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Stents , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/therapy , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Cerebral Angiography , Computer Simulation , Hemodynamics , Humans , Hydrodynamics , Imaging, Three-Dimensional , Intracranial Aneurysm/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Angiography , Prosthesis Design , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging
5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(7)2021 Jul 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307884

ABSTRACT

A rare case of a hypoplastic internal carotid artery (ICA) terminating in the ophthalmic artery with multiple intracranial saccular aneurysms in the contralateral ICA, anterior communicating artery fenestration and triple A2 was identified. The aetiology and pathogenesis of ICA hypoplasia are subjected to certain hypotheses. Developing several collaterals to preserve the blood supply of the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere could result in aneurysm formation due to flow overload on the contralateral vasculature, but it could also result in hemicranial hypoplasia, cerebral atrophy and deep watershed infarcts, as in our case.


Subject(s)
Intracranial Aneurysm , Ophthalmic Artery , Anterior Cerebral Artery , Carotid Artery, Internal/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Angiography , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Aneurysm/etiology , Ophthalmic Artery/diagnostic imaging
7.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(9): 105944, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267765

ABSTRACT

Ten days after SARS-Cov2 reinfection with mild gastrointestinal symptoms and headache that occurred 2 months after an initial infection, a previously healthy 37-year-old woman developed fluctuating facial and upper limb paresthesia and weakness. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed ischemic lesions in the right parietal region of different stages within the same vascular territory. A cerebral angiography demonstrated an isolated focal arteriopathy with no other arterial involvement. Focal cerebral arteriopathy is exceedingly rare among adults and most commonly triggered by varicella-zoster virus reactivation. We present a case of focal cerebral arteriopathy in a patient with a recent reinfection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Arterial Diseases/etiology , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Reinfection , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Cerebral Angiography , Cerebral Arterial Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Arterial Diseases/drug therapy , Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Dual Anti-Platelet Therapy , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/drug therapy , Magnetic Resonance Angiography , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
8.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 41(4): e761-e763, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232245

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: It is recommended that every patient with a new third nerve palsy undergo urgent neuroimaging (computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance angiography) to exclude a posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Because of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, our institution noted a significant decline in the number of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage presenting to the hospital. We report one such example of a patient who developed new-onset severe headache and vomiting and did not seek medical attention because of COVID-19. Two months later, she was noted to have ptosis during a routine follow-up and was found to have a complete, pupil-involving third nerve palsy. Computed tomography angiography was performed and revealed an irregular bilobed saccular aneurysm (7 × 9 × 5 mm) of the right posterior communicating (PComm) artery, but no acute hemorrhage was visible on CT. On MRI, immediately adjacent to the aneurysm, there was a small subacute hematoma in the right medial temporal lobe with surrounding vasogenic edema. This case had a fortunate and unique outcome as she had a contained hematoma adjacent to the ruptured PComm aneurysm and did not experience severe morbidity from the subarachnoid hemorrhage nor did she rebleed in the interval in which she did not seek care. This case highlights the importance of providing neuro-ophthalmic care even during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Ruptured/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , Intracranial Aneurysm/diagnostic imaging , Oculomotor Nerve Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Aneurysm, Ruptured/complications , Cerebral Angiography , Female , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/complications , Magnetic Resonance Angiography , Oculomotor Nerve Diseases/complications
9.
Stroke ; 51(12): 3765-3769, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Evaluation of the lung apices using computed tomography angiography of the head and neck during acute ischemic stroke (AIS) can provide the first objective opportunity to screen for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We performed an analysis assessing the utility of apical lung exam on computed tomography angiography for COVID-19-specific lung findings in 57 patients presenting with AIS. We measured the diagnostic accuracy of apical lung assessment alone and in combination with patient-reported symptoms and incorporate both to propose a COVID-19 era AIS algorithm. RESULTS: Apical lung assessment when used in isolation, yielded a sensitivity of 0.67, specificity of 0.93, positive predictive value of 0.19, negative predictive value of 0.99, and accuracy of 0.92 for the diagnosis of COVID-19, in patients presenting to the hospital for AIS. When combined with self-reported clinical symptoms of cough or shortness of breath, sensitivity of apical lung assessment improved to 0.83. CONCLUSIONS: Apical lung assessment on computed tomography angiography is an accurate screening tool for COVID-19 and can serve as part of a combined screening approach in AIS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Angiography/methods , Computed Tomography Angiography/methods , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Male , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , Sensitivity and Specificity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
10.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(3): 105542, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965527

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report six consecutive patients with confirmed coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) who underwent Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography evaluation for cerebral microemboli in the setting of suspected or confirmed acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: Patient data were obtained from medical records from Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL between May and June 2020. All patients with confirmed COVID-19 who underwent clinical TCD ultrasonography for microemboli detection were included. RESULTS: A total of eight TCD studies were performed in six patients with COVID-19 (4 men and 2 women, median age 65±5), four with confirmed ischemic stroke and two with refractory encephalopathy. Microemboli were detected in three male patients, two patients had suffered a confirmed ischemic stroke and one who developed prolonged encephalopathy. Microemboli of varying intensity were identified in multiple vascular territories in two patients, and microemboli persisted despite therapeutic anticoagulation in a third patient. Of the three patients without evidence of microemboli on TCD ultrasonography, two patients had suffered a confirmed ischemic stroke, while one remained with refractory encephalopathy. CONCLUSIONS: TCD ultrasonography for microemboli detection identified three patients with confirmed COVID-19 with evidence of cerebral arterial microemboli, including one who was therapeutically anticoagulated. TCD ultrasonography provides a non-invasive method for evaluating cerebral microemboli in patients with COVID-19 and may be useful in assessing response to treatment in cases with suspected or confirmed disorders of hypercoagulability. Further studies investigating the prevalence of cerebral microemboli and associated risk factors are needed to characterize their pathogenic mechanism and guide therapeutic interventions in hospitalized COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intracranial Embolism/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Embolism/etiology , Aged , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases/etiology , Cerebral Angiography , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Female , Humans , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/etiology , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/therapy , Intracranial Embolism/therapy , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Thrombectomy , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial
11.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 40(4): 457-462, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-926387

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent studies have noted concern for increased thromboembolic events in the setting of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a form of thromboembolism that has been observed as a neuro-ophthalmologic complication of COVID-19. METHODS: Review of the scientific literature. RESULTS: In this article, we report an overview of CVST epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, disease pathophysiology, and management in the setting of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: CVST is an uncommon thromboembolic event with variable phenotypes and multiple etiologies. Neurologic complications can be severe, including significant visual deficits and death. Current observations suggest that the risk of CVST may be profoundly impacted by this novel COVID-19 pandemic, thus prompting increased attention to disease presentation, pathogenesis, and management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/epidemiology , Cerebral Angiography , Humans , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/diagnosis , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/physiopathology , United States/epidemiology
13.
BMC Neurol ; 20(1): 358, 2020 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) global pandemic is associated with an increased incidence of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) secondary to large vessel occlusion (LVO). The treatment of these patients poses unique and significant challenges to health care providers requiring changes in existing protocols. CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old COVID-19 positive patient developed sudden onset left hemiparesis secondary to an acute right middle cerebral artery occlusion (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score = 11). Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) was performed under a new protocol specifically designed to maximize protective measures for the team involved in the care of the patient. Mechanical Thrombectomy was performed successfully under general anesthesia resulting in TICI 3 recanalization. With regards to time metrics, time from door to reperfusion was 60 mins. The 24-h NIHSS score decreased to 2. Patient was discharged after 19 days after improvement of her pulmonary status with modified Rankin Scale = 1. CONCLUSION: Patients infected by COVID-19 can develop LVO that is multifactorial in etiology. Mechanical thrombectomy in a COVID-19 confirmed patient presenting with AIS due to LVO is feasible with current mechanical thrombectomy devices. A change in stroke workflow and protocols is now necessary in order to deliver the appropriate life-saving therapy for COVID-19 positive patients while protecting medical providers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/surgery , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Thrombectomy/methods , Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/surgery , COVID-19 , Cerebral Angiography , Computed Tomography Angiography , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/complications , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Intubation, Intratracheal , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Reperfusion , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
16.
Stroke ; 51(11): 3366-3370, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-722391

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Reports are emerging regarding the association of acute ischemic strokes with large vessel occlusion and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). While a higher severity of these patients could be expected from the addition of both respiratory and neurological injury, COVID-19 patients with strokes can present with mild or none respiratory symptoms. We aimed to compare anterior circulation large vessel occlusion strokes severity between patients with and without COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a comparative cohort study between patients with COVID-19 who had anterior circulation large vessel occlusion and early brain imaging within 3 hours from onset, in our institution during the 6 first weeks of the COVID-19 outbreak and a control group admitted during the same calendar period in 2019. RESULTS: Twelve COVID-19 patients with anterior circulation large vessel occlusion and early brain imaging were included during the study period and compared with 34 control patients with anterior circulation large vessel occlusion and early brain imaging in 2019. Patients in the COVID-19 group were younger (P=0.032) and had a history of diabetes mellitus more frequently (P=0.039). Patients did not significantly differ on initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale nor time from onset to imaging (P=0.18 and P=0.6, respectively). Patients with COVID-19 had more severe strokes than patients without COVID-19, with a significantly lower clot burden score (median: 6.5 versus 8, P=0.016), higher rate of multivessel occlusion (50% versus 8.8%, P=0.005), lower DWI-ASPECTS (Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Scores; median: 5 versus 8, P=0.006), and higher infarct core volume (median: 58 versus 6 mL, P=0.004). Successful recanalization rate was similar in both groups (P=0.767). In-hospital mortality was higher in the COVID-19 patients' group (41.7% versus 11.8%, P=0.025). CONCLUSIONS: Early brain imaging showed higher severity large vessel occlusion strokes in patients with COVID-19. Given the massive number of infected patients, concerns should be raised about the coming neurovascular impact of the pandemic worldwide.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Cerebral Angiography , Computed Tomography Angiography , Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Infarction, Anterior Cerebral Artery/complications , Infarction, Anterior Cerebral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Infarction, Anterior Cerebral Artery/physiopathology , Infarction, Anterior Cerebral Artery/therapy , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/complications , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/physiopathology , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/therapy , Infarction, Posterior Cerebral Artery/complications , Infarction, Posterior Cerebral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Infarction, Posterior Cerebral Artery/physiopathology , Infarction, Posterior Cerebral Artery/therapy , Magnetic Resonance Angiography , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Stroke/complications , Stroke/physiopathology , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy
17.
Clin Neuroradiol ; 31(3): 653-659, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-723015

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for up to 20% of all strokes, and there is a high rate of associated morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) findings, such as a spot sign have been shown to be an independent predictor of poor outcome. We have recently encountered a succession of ICH patients who presented with a peculiar imaging finding, which we term the spot on a string sign. This is a rare imaging finding, and interestingly, all these patients presented to our institution over the last few weeks. METHODS: This was a single high-volume center series of patients who presented to our institution between 1 April and 21 May 2020. All patients underwent initial non-contrast CT brain and subsequent CT angiography (CTA). We also present laboratory and clinical data. Our primary measure was the presence of the spot on a string sign on the CTA. We also report the clinical course of these patients. RESULTS: In this study seven large-volume ICH patients with this imaging sign were identified, with a median age of 48 years (range 30-68 years). All had tested negative for coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). CONCLUSION: We have described an unusual imaging finding in a cohort of younger patients with large-volume ICH, all of whom presented in a 2-month period to a high-volume neurovascular unit. The cause of these ICH presentations and associated imaging findings are unclear, but we encourage other clinicians to be aware of and vigilant for this rare phenomenon, especially in younger patients with such a bleeding pattern.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Adult , Aged , Cerebral Angiography , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Female , Hematoma , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Emerg Radiol ; 27(6): 747-754, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-709794

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was declared a global pandemic on March 1, 2020. Neurological manifestations are now being reported worldwide, including emergent presentation with acute neurological changes as well as a comorbidity in hospitalized patients. There is limited knowledge on the neurologic manifestations of COVID-19 at present, with a wide array of neurological complications reported, ranging from ischemic stroke to acute demyelination and encephalitis. We report five cases of COVID-19 presenting to the ER with acute neurological symptoms, over the course of 1 month. This includes two cases of ischemic stroke, one with large-vessel occlusion and one with embolic infarcts. The remainders of the cases include acute tumefactive demyelination, isolated cytotoxic edema of the corpus callosum with subarachnoid hemorrhage, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Emergencies , Neuroimaging/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Brain Diseases/therapy , COVID-19 , Cerebral Angiography , Computed Tomography Angiography , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/therapy , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/therapy , Stroke/virology
19.
Stroke ; 51(9): e227-e231, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695959

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) evolved quickly into a global pandemic with myriad systemic complications, including stroke. We report the largest case series to date of cerebrovascular complications of COVID-19 and compare with stroke patients without infection. METHODS: Retrospective case series of COVID-19 patients with imaging-confirmed stroke, treated at 11 hospitals in New York, between March 14 and April 26, 2020. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, imaging, and outcome data were collected, and cases were compared with date-matched controls without COVID-19 from 1 year prior. RESULTS: Eighty-six COVID-19-positive stroke cases were identified (mean age, 67.4 years; 44.2% women). Ischemic stroke (83.7%) and nonfocal neurological presentations (67.4%) predominated, commonly involving multivascular distributions (45.8%) with associated hemorrhage (20.8%). Compared with controls (n=499), COVID-19 was associated with in-hospital stroke onset (47.7% versus 5.0%; P<0.001), mortality (29.1% versus 9.0%; P<0.001), and Black/multiracial race (58.1% versus 36.9%; P=0.001). COVID-19 was the strongest independent risk factor for in-hospital stroke (odds ratio, 20.9 [95% CI, 10.4-42.2]; P<0.001), whereas COVID-19, older age, and intracranial hemorrhage independently predicted mortality. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is an independent risk factor for stroke in hospitalized patients and mortality, and stroke presentations are frequently atypical.


Subject(s)
Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia/etiology , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Cerebral Angiography , Cerebrovascular Disorders/mortality , Cerebrovascular Disorders/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/complications , Intracranial Hemorrhages/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Neuroimaging , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/therapy , Treatment Outcome
20.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 216(1): 150-156, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND. An increase in frequency of acute ischemic strokes has been observed among patients presenting with acute neurologic symptoms during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between COVID-19 and stroke subtypes in patients presenting with acute neurologic symptoms. METHODS. This retrospective case-control study included patients for whom a code for stroke was activated from March 16 to April 30, 2020, at any of six New York City hospitals that are part of a single health system. Demographic data (age, sex, and race or ethnicity), COVID-19 status, stroke-related risk factors, and clinical and imaging findings pertaining to stroke were collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between COVID-19 and stroke subtypes. RESULTS. The study sample consisted of 329 patients for whom a code for stroke was activated (175 [53.2%] men, 154 [46.8%] women; mean age, 66.9 ± 14.9 [SD] years). Among the 329 patients, 35.3% (116) had acute ischemic stroke confirmed with imaging; 21.6% (71) had large vessel occlusion (LVO) stroke; and 14.6% (48) had small vessel occlusion (SVO) stroke. Among LVO strokes, the most common location was middle cerebral artery segments M1 and M2 (62.0% [44/71]). Multifocal LVOs were present in 9.9% (7/71) of LVO strokes. COVID-19 was present in 38.3% (126/329) of the patients. The 61.7% (203/329) of patients without COVID-19 formed the negative control group. Among individual stroke-related risk factors, only Hispanic ethnicity was significantly associated with COVID-19 (38.1% of patients with COVID-19 vs 20.7% of patients without COVID-19; p = 0.001). LVO was present in 31.7% of patients with COVID-19 compared with 15.3% of patients without COVID-19 (p = 0.001). SVO was present in 15.9% of patients with COVID-19 and 13.8% of patients without COVID-19 (p = 0.632). In multivariate analysis controlled for race and ethnicity, presence of COVID-19 had a significant independent association with LVO stroke (odds ratio, 2.4) compared with absence of COVID-19 (p = 0.011). CONCLUSION. COVID-19 is associated with LVO strokes but not with SVO strokes. CLINICAL IMPACT. Patients with COVID-19 presenting with acute neurologic symptoms warrant a lower threshold for suspicion of large vessel stroke, and prompt workup for large vessel stroke is recommended.


Subject(s)
Arterial Occlusive Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Neuroimaging/methods , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/etiology , Aged , Case-Control Studies , Cerebral Angiography , Computed Tomography Angiography , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Angiography , Male , New York City , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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