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1.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 1412021 04 30.
Article in English, Norwegian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: New vaccines against COVID-19 are being rolled out globally. AstraZeneca's vaccine ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 was not known to cause vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) at the time of this case. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient was a previously healthy woman in her thirties with headaches that developed one week after vaccination with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19. Three days later, her condition deteriorated rapidly, and she presented to the emergency department with slurred speech, uncoordinated movements and reduced consciousness. Symptoms progressed to left-sided hemiparesis and her level of consciousness deteriorated. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed a large right-sided haemorrhage and incipient herniation. She was found to have severe thrombocytopenia 37 x 109/l, (ref 145 - 390 x 109/l). In spite of efforts to reduce intracranial pressure, the patient died the following day. Post mortem examination revealed antibodies to PF4, and fresh small thrombi were found in the transverse sinus, frontal lobe and pulmonary artery. INTERPRETATION: Severe thrombocytopenia and antibodies to PF4 make a diagnosis of vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) likely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(8)2021 Aug 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354558

ABSTRACT

A 60-year-old patient presented with respiratory distress, after recently being tested COVID-19 positive and was mechanically ventilated for 15 days. After cessation of sedation, he remained in deep comatose state, without any reaction on pain stimuli (Glasgow Coma Score 3). MRI of the brain showed diffuse leukoencephalopathy and multiple (>50) microbleeds. Diffuse COVID-19-associated leukoencephalopathy with microhaemorrhages is associated with a poor prognosis. However, 3 months later, our patient showed a remarkable recovery and was able to walk independently. This case report shows COVID-related leukoencephalopathy and intracerebral microbleeds, even with persistent comatose state, may have a favourable clinical outcome and prolonged treatment should be considered in individual cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukoencephalopathies , Cerebral Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Coma/chemically induced , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Leukoencephalopathies/diagnosis , Leukoencephalopathies/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Clin Neurosci ; 89: 271-278, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213386

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic affects the worldwide healthcare system and our understanding of this disease grows rapidly. Although COVID-19 is a mainly respiratory disease, neurological manifestations are not uncommon. The aim of this review is to report on the etiology, clinical profile, location, and outcome of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and COVID-19. This review includes 36 studies examining ICH in the clinical presentation of COVID-19. Overall, 217 cases with intracranial hemorrhage, of which 188 ICHs, were reported. Generally, a low incidence of both primary and secondary ICH was found in 8 studies [106 (0.25%) out of 43,137 hospitalized patients with COVID-19]. Available data showed a median age of 58 years (range: 52-68) and male sex 64%, regarding 36 and 102 patients respectively. Furthermore, 75% of the patients were on prior anticoagulation treatment, 52% had a history of arterial hypertension, and 61% were admitted in intensive care unit. Location of ICH in deep structures/basal ganglia was ascertained in only 7 cases making arterial hypertension an improbable etiopathogenetic mechanism. Mortality was calculated at 52.7%. Disease related pathophysiologic mechanisms support the hypothesis that SARS-CoV2 can cause ICH, however typical ICH risk factors such as anticoagulation treatment, or admission to ICU should also be considered as probable causes. Physicians should strongly suspect the possibility of ICH in individuals with severe COVID-19 admitted to ICU and treated with anticoagulants. It is not clear whether ICH is related directly to COVID-19 or reflects expected comorbidity and/or complications observed in severely ill patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Anticoagulants/pharmacology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation/physiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cerebral Hemorrhage/drug therapy , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Hypertension/diagnostic imaging , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Neurology ; 95(14): e2016-e2027, 2020 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105774

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is considered to have potential neuroinvasiveness that might lead to acute brain disorders or contribute to respiratory distress in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study investigates the occurrence of structural brain abnormalities in non-survivors of COVID-19 in a virtopsy framework. METHODS: In this prospective, monocentric, case series study, consecutive patients who fulfilled the following inclusion criteria benefited from an early postmortem structural brain MRI: death <24 hours, SARS-CoV-2 detection on nasopharyngeal swab specimen, chest CT scan suggestive of COVID-19, absence of known focal brain lesion, and MRI compatibility. RESULTS: Among the 62 patients who died of COVID-19 from March 31, 2020, to April 24, 2020, at our institution, 19 decedents fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Parenchymal brain abnormalities were observed in 4 decedents: subcortical microbleeds and macrobleeds (2 decedents), cortico-subcortical edematous changes evocative of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES; 1 decedent), and nonspecific deep white matter changes (1 decedent). Asymmetric olfactory bulbs were found in 4 other decedents without downstream olfactory tract abnormalities. No brainstem MRI signal abnormality was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Postmortem brain MRI demonstrates hemorrhagic and PRES-related brain lesions in non-survivors of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2-related olfactory impairment seems to be limited to olfactory bulbs. Brainstem MRI findings do not support a brain-related contribution to respiratory distress in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Brain Edema/diagnostic imaging , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Olfactory Bulb/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Postmortem Changes , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , White Matter/diagnostic imaging
7.
Brain ; 143(10): 3089-3103, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066270

ABSTRACT

Since the appearance of the first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) a pandemic has emerged affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Although the main clinical manifestations are respiratory, an increase in neurological conditions, specifically acute cerebrovascular disease, has been detected. We present cerebrovascular disease case incidence in hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Patients were confirmed by microbiological/serological testing, or on chest CT semiology. Available data on co-morbidity, laboratory parameters, treatment administered, neuroimaging, neuropathological studies and clinical evolution during hospitalization, measured by the modified Rankin scale, were analysed. A bivariate study was also designed to identify differences between ischaemic and haemorrhagic subtypes. A statistical model of binary logistic regression and sensitivity analysis was designed to study the influence of independent variables over prognosis. In our centre, there were 1683 admissions of patients with COVID-19 over 50 days, of which 23 (1.4%) developed cerebrovascular disease. Within this group of patients, cerebral and chest CT scans were performed in all cases, and MRI in six (26.1%). Histological samples were obtained in 6/23 cases (two brain biopsies, and four arterial thrombi). Seventeen patients were classified as cerebral ischaemia (73.9%, with two arterial dissections), five as intracerebral haemorrhage (21.7%), and one leukoencephalopathy of posterior reversible encephalopathy type. Haemorrhagic patients had higher ferritin levels at the time of stroke (1554.3 versus 519.2, P = 0.004). Ischaemic strokes were unexpectedly frequent in the vertebrobasilar territory (6/17, 35.3%). In the haemorrhagic group, a characteristic radiological pattern was identified showing subarachnoid haemorrhage, parieto-occipital leukoencephalopathy, microbleeds and single or multiple focal haematomas. Brain biopsies performed showed signs of thrombotic microangiopathy and endothelial injury, with no evidence of vasculitis or necrotizing encephalitis. The functional prognosis during the hospital period was unfavourable in 73.9% (17/23 modified Rankin scale 4-6), and age was the main predictive variable (odds ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence interval 1.012-2.225; P = 0.043). Our series shows cerebrovascular disease incidence of 1.4% in patients with COVID-19 with high morbidity and mortality. We describe pathological and radiological data consistent with thrombotic microangiopathy caused by endotheliopathy with a haemorrhagic predisposition.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Leukoencephalopathies/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Age Factors , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain/pathology , Brain Ischemia/pathology , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/blood , Cerebral Hemorrhage/pathology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Ferritins/blood , Humans , Incidence , Leukoencephalopathies/diagnostic imaging , Leukoencephalopathies/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Neuroimaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
9.
Stroke ; 51(12): 3719-3722, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050419

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Case series indicating cerebrovascular disorders in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been published. Comprehensive workups, including clinical characteristics, laboratory, electroencephalography, neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid findings, are needed to understand the mechanisms. METHODS: We evaluated 32 consecutive critically ill patients with COVID-19 treated at a tertiary care center from March 9 to April 3, 2020, for concomitant severe central nervous system involvement. Patients identified underwent computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and autopsy in case of death. RESULTS: Of 32 critically ill patients with COVID-19, 8 (25%) had severe central nervous system involvement. Two presented with lacunar ischemic stroke in the early phase and 6 with prolonged impaired consciousness after termination of analgosedation. In all but one with delayed wake-up, neuroimaging or autopsy showed multiple cerebral microbleeds, in 3 with additional subarachnoid hemorrhage and in 2 with additional small ischemic lesions. In 3 patients, intracranial vessel wall sequence magnetic resonance imaging was performed for the first time to our knowledge. All showed contrast enhancement of vessel walls in large cerebral arteries, suggesting vascular wall pathologies with an inflammatory component. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions for SARS-CoV-2 in cerebrospinal fluid were all negative. No intrathecal SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG synthesis was detectable. CONCLUSIONS: Different mechanisms of cerebrovascular disorders might be involved in COVID-19. Acute ischemic stroke might occur early. In a later phase, microinfarctions and vessel wall contrast enhancement occur, indicating small and large cerebral vessels involvement. Central nervous system disorders associated with COVID-19 may lead to long-term disabilities. Mechanisms should be urgently investigated to develop neuroprotective strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Arteries/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebrovascular Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/etiology , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Cerebrospinal Fluid/immunology , Cerebrospinal Fluid/virology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/cerebrospinal fluid , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Consciousness Disorders/etiology , Consciousness Disorders/physiopathology , Contrast Media , Critical Illness , Electroencephalography , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Switzerland , Tertiary Care Centers , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
10.
Am J Case Rep ; 22: e927011, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005105

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) originated in Wuhan, China, and is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Severe respiratory symptoms are a hallmark of the disease, which may also include complications related to a hypercoagulable state and central nervous system involvement. These complications can occur during either the acute or the recovery phase. The cerebral involvement typically manifests as intracranial hypertension, intracerebral hemorrhage, diffuse encephalopathy, or cerebral venous thrombosis. The hemorrhagic form of cerebral venous thrombosis can be a diagnostic challenge and is treated by anticoagulation therapy, despite the existence of an intracerebral hemorrhage. This report describes a case of superficial cerebral venous thrombosis and intracerebral hematoma in a 48-year-old man weeks after recovering from the acute phase of SARSCoV-2 infection. CASE REPORT A 48-year-old man with a past medical history of SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed by SARS-CoV-2 reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction presented with left upper-limb numbness, weakness, and impaired positional sensorium. After initial stabilization, noncontrast computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed an intracerebral hemorrhage with underlying cerebral venous thrombosis. The patient was successfully treated with enoxaparin anticoagulation therapy, and symptoms improved over the following 12 days. CONCLUSIONS Central nervous system venous thrombosis is an atypical presentation of the hypercoagulable state primarily seen in younger patients, and it can occur in a delayed fashion after recovery from mild forms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Hematoma/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Cerebral Hemorrhage/virology , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Hematoma/virology , Humans , Intracranial Thrombosis/drug therapy , Intracranial Thrombosis/virology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/virology
12.
Neuroradiol J ; 34(2): 147-150, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975845

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a fatal cerebral haemorrhage in an 82-year-old male patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), who was taking prophylactic oral anticoagulation because of atrial fibrillation (rivaroxaban 20 mg q.d. for two years). On admission, the patient was deeply comatose, mechanically ventilated, with tachycardia up to 150 bpm, high blood pressure >210/120 mmHg and a body temperature >39°C. A computed tomography scan of the head showed a large intracerebral haemorrhage located in the deep structures of the right hemisphere, with a mass effect and bleeding to the ventricles. Rivaroxaban was discontinued at admission. The patient tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but he did not have typical symptoms of pneumonia. In the following days, the patient's neurological condition did not improve, and a fever of up to 40°C and abnormal coagulation parameters remained resistant to pharmacotherapy. The patient developed multi-system organ failure and died on day 8. Here, we review the recent literature and discuss the possible association of SARS-CoV-2-mediated endothelial injury and cardiovascular disorders with cerebrovascular complications. We postulate that anti-inflammatory treatment in COVID-19 and the stabilisation of endothelium functions can be particularly important in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Hypertension/complications , Rivaroxaban/adverse effects , Stroke/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Atrial Fibrillation/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/therapy , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Hypotension/etiology , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/etiology , Tachycardia/etiology
13.
J Neurol ; 268(8): 2676-2684, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938566

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the COVID-19 outbreak, the presence of extensive white matter microhemorrhages was detected by brain MRIs. The goal of this study was to investigate the origin of this atypical hemorrhagic complication. METHODS: Between March 17 and May 18, 2020, 80 patients with severe COVID-19 infections were admitted for acute respiratory distress syndrome to intensive care units at the University Hospitals of Strasbourg for whom a brain MRI for neurologic manifestations was performed. 19 patients (24%) with diffuse microhemorrhages were compared to 18 control patients with COVID-19 and normal brain MRI. RESULTS: The first hypothesis was hypoxemia. The latter seemed very likely since respiratory failure was longer and more pronounced in patients with microhemorrhages (prolonged endotracheal intubation (p = 0.0002), higher FiO2 (p = 0.03), increased use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (p = 0.04)). A relevant hypothesis, the role of microangiopathy, was also considered, since patients with microhemorrhages presented a higher increase of the D-Dimers (p = 0.01) and a tendency to more frequent thrombotic events (p = 0.12). Another hypothesis tested was the role of kidney failure, which was more severe in the group with diffuse microhemorrhages (higher creatinine level [median of 293 µmol/L versus 112 µmol/L, p = 0.04] and more dialysis were introduced in this group during ICU stay [12 versus 5 patients, p = 0.04]). CONCLUSIONS: Blood-brain barrier dysfunction secondary to hypoxemia and high concentration of uremic toxins seems to be the main mechanism leading to critical illness-associated cerebral microbleeds, and this complication remains to be frequently described in severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Cerebral Hemorrhage/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Critical Illness , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Stroke Vasc Neurol ; 5(4): 315-322, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934125

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cerebral microhaemorrhages are increasingly being recognised as a complication of COVID-19. This observational retrospective study aims to further investigate the potential pathophysiology through assessing the pattern of microhaemorrhage and clinical characteristics of patients with COVID-19 and microhaemorrhage. By comparing with similar patterns of microhaemorrhage in other non-COVID-19 disease, this study aims to propose possible common pathogenic mechanisms. METHODS: A retrospective observational case series was performed identifying all patients with COVID-19 complicated by cerebral microhaemorrhage on MRI. The distribution and number of microhaemorrhages were recorded using the microbleed anatomical scale, and patients' baseline characteristics and salient test results were also recorded. RESULTS: Cerebral microhaemorrhages were noted to have a predilection for the corpus callosum, the juxtacortical white matter and brainstem. All patients had a preceding period of critical illness with respiratory failure and severe hypoxia necessitating intubation and mechanical ventilation. DISCUSSION: This study demonstrates a pattern of cerebral microhaemorrhage that is similar to the pattern reported in patients with non-COVID-19 related critical illness and other causes of severe hypoxia. This raises questions regarding whether microhaemorrhage occurs from endothelial dysfunction due the direct effect of SARS-CoV-2 infection or from the secondary effects of critical illness and hypoxia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Aged , Brain Stem/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Corpus Callosum/diagnostic imaging , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , White Matter/diagnostic imaging
15.
J Neuroimaging ; 30(5): 593-597, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-840698

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Covid-19, initially described as a respiratory system's infection, is currently more and more recognized as a multiorganic disease, including neurological manifestations. There is growing evidence about a potential neuroinvasive role of SARS-CoV-2. The purpose of this study is to describe new findings, in the form of cerebral microbleeds affecting different brain structures, observed in MRIs of critically ill patients. METHODS: For this purpose, the MR images of 9 patients with a common pattern of abnormal findings (2 women/7 men; 55-79 years of age; mean age: 67.7 years) were depicted. All patients were tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and presented with delayed recovery of consciousness or important agitation, requiring brain MRI. RESULTS: All patients had suffered from severe (5/9) or moderate (4/9) acute respiratory distress syndrome, requiring prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. Their common MRI finding was the presence of microbleeds in unusual distribution with a specific predilection for the corpus callosum. Other uncommon locations of microbleeds were the internal capsule (5/9), as well as middle cerebellar peduncles (5/9). Subcortical regions were also affected in the majority of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Brain MRI raised evidence that Covid-19 or its related treatment may involve the brain with an unusual pattern of microbleeds, predominantly affecting the corpus callosum. The mechanism of this finding is still unclear but the differential diagnosis should include thrombotic microangiopathy related to direct or indirect-through the cytokine cascade-damage by the SARS-CoV-2 on the endothelium of brain's vessels, as well as mechanisms similar to the hypoxemia brain-blood-barrier injury.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Corpus Callosum , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Hypoxia , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Neuroradiol J ; 33(6): 528-531, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760511

ABSTRACT

A wide range of neurological complications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is increasingly recognised. Although the majority of these remain ischaemic and haemorrhagic events, various disorders are being reported. In particular, several cases of diffuse acute leukoencephalopathy have been observed in critically ill patients with COVID-19 disease. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with multiple comorbidities and severe COVID-19 pneumonia who developed a diffuse leukoencephalopathy with microhaemorrhages and extensive associated white matter necrosis. Although this is the first documented case of extensive COVID-19-associated white matter necrosis, we highlight the relatively constant features of this injury similar to previously reported cases, including symmetrical involvement of the supratentorial white matter, sparing of the peripheral subcortical regions except in the precentral gyri, frequently associated microhaemorrhages, relative sparing of the deep gray matter structures and infratentorial structures, and lack of enhancement.


Subject(s)
Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Leukoencephalopathies/diagnostic imaging , White Matter/diagnostic imaging , Bacteremia/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Candidemia/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Leukoencephalopathies/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Necrosis , Renal Dialysis , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , White Matter/pathology
17.
Neurologia (Engl Ed) ; 35(9): 621-627, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-759217

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We analysed the neurological complications of patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection who required intensive care unit (ICU) admission. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, observational, descriptive study of consecutive patients admitted to the ICU due to severe respiratory symptoms secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection between 1 April and 1 June 2020. RESULTS: We included 30 patients with neurological symptoms; 21 were men (72.40%), and mean age (standard deviation [SD]) was 57.41 years (11.61). The mean duration of ICU stay was 18.83 days (14.33). The neurological conditions recorded were acute confusional syndrome in 28 patients (93.33%), neuromuscular disease in 15 (50%), headache in 5 (16.66%), cerebrovascular disease in 4 (13.33%), and encephalopathies/encephalitis in 4 (13.33%). CSF analysis results were normal in 6 patients (20%). Brain MRI or head CT showed alterations in 20 patients (66.6%). EEG was performed in all patients (100%), with 8 (26.66%) showing abnormal findings. In 5 of the 15 patients with clinical myopathy, diagnosis was confirmed with electroneuromyography. We found a correlation between older age and duration of ICU stay (P=.002; 95%CI: 4.032-6.022; OR: 3,594). CONCLUSIONS: Severe COVID-19 mainly affects men, as observed in other series. Half of our patients presented acute myopathy, and almost all patients left the ICU with acute confusional syndrome, which fully resolved; no correlation was found with EEG or neuroimaging findings. Older age is associated with longer ICU stay.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Critical Illness , Muscular Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acute Disease , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Confusion/epidemiology , Confusion/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Muscular Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Neuroimaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
18.
Clin Imaging ; 68: 239-241, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733895

ABSTRACT

Neurologic complications of COVID-19 infection have been recently described and include dizziness, headache, loss of taste and smell, stroke, and encephalopathy. Brain MRI in these patients have revealed various findings including ischemia, hemorrhage, inflammation, and demyelination. In this article, we report a case of critical illness-associated cerebral microbleeds identified on MRI in a patient with severe COVID-19 infection and discuss the potential etiologies of these neuroimaging findings.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Critical Illness , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Stroke , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology
19.
Clin Neuroradiol ; 31(3): 653-659, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-723015

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for up to 20% of all strokes, and there is a high rate of associated morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) findings, such as a spot sign have been shown to be an independent predictor of poor outcome. We have recently encountered a succession of ICH patients who presented with a peculiar imaging finding, which we term the spot on a string sign. This is a rare imaging finding, and interestingly, all these patients presented to our institution over the last few weeks. METHODS: This was a single high-volume center series of patients who presented to our institution between 1 April and 21 May 2020. All patients underwent initial non-contrast CT brain and subsequent CT angiography (CTA). We also present laboratory and clinical data. Our primary measure was the presence of the spot on a string sign on the CTA. We also report the clinical course of these patients. RESULTS: In this study seven large-volume ICH patients with this imaging sign were identified, with a median age of 48 years (range 30-68 years). All had tested negative for coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). CONCLUSION: We have described an unusual imaging finding in a cohort of younger patients with large-volume ICH, all of whom presented in a 2-month period to a high-volume neurovascular unit. The cause of these ICH presentations and associated imaging findings are unclear, but we encourage other clinicians to be aware of and vigilant for this rare phenomenon, especially in younger patients with such a bleeding pattern.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Adult , Aged , Cerebral Angiography , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Female , Hematoma , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Am J Case Rep ; 21: e925641, 2020 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721632

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Acute hemorrhagic necrotizing encephalitis (AHNE) is a rare manifestation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. AHNE usually involves the subcortical white matter but not the cortical grey matter. This study describes the disruptive effects of AHNE associated with SARS-CoV-2 on cognitive function in a previously healthy and sound middle-aged woman resulting from alterations in cortical areas involved in the cognitive network. CASE REPORT A 44-year-old previously healthy woman with a history of inter-state travel developed a flu-like illness, followed by acute, steadily progressive cognitive impairment. She was admitted in a comatose state after a first tonic-clonic seizure. Blood tests were non-informative. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was indicative of AHNE. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed mild lymphocytosis with normal protein and normal glucose but an elevated IgG index. After testing positive for SARS-CoV-2, she was administered steroids. Treatment was ineffective, and the patient died. CONCLUSIONS SARS-CoV-2 is a potential central nervous system (CNS) pathogen, which may manifest as AHNE. These patients may present with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and frontal dysexecutive syndrome, with cognitive impairment being the presenting feature of neuro-coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). The patient described in this report is unique for acute-onset and isolated cognitive impairments due to SARS-CoV-2 infection in the absence of clinical or radiological respiratory manifestations. These findings may help in the early detection and diagnosis of neuro-COVID-19, especially among clinicians and neurologists working in areas of endemic SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cerebral Hemorrhage/virology , Cognitive Dysfunction/virology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Encephalitis/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Encephalitis/diagnostic imaging , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/cerebrospinal fluid , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/virology
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