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1.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 123(2): 140-143, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643738

ABSTRACT

This study aims to make a comparative evaluation of the change in the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage [intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)] cases that attended our hospital in the Covid-19 pandemic period with that of the same term one year ago. This study included 80 patients diagnosed with ICH and/or SAH in the period that started with the pandemic in 2020. It was determined that 51 patients had been diagnosed with ICH and/or SAH during the same period of 2019. A total of 131 ICH and SAH patients (2019; n=51, 39%; and 2020; n=80, 61 %) having an average age of 64.52±7.33 including 66 women (50.4 %) were included in the study in the nine -month follow-up periods covering the period of March-November of 2019 and 2020, respectively. It was determined that the number of patients diagnosed with ICH and SAH during the pandemic was higher than the number of those who attended our clinic in 2019 (80 vs 51) and that they were older (65.76±6.56 years vs 62.57±8.09 years) (p=0.014 and p=0.026, respectively). The incidence and distribution of ICH and SAH among the patients were similar (p >0.05). It was determined that in 1 patient, ICH and SAH co-existed. In the study, it was determined that among the patients treated for intracranial hemorrhage in 2020, 32.5 % were diagnosed with COVID-19 as validated by positive nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 PCR. The evaluation of the patients in 2020 revealed that the average age and ICH and SAH incidence in COVID-19 (+) and COVID-19 (-) patients were similar. Although increased incidence of acute intracranial hemorrhage has been observed during COVID-19 pandemic a athophysiological correlation between the two clinical presentations could not be clearly demonstrated. When rapidly progressing neurological deterioration findings are present in COVID-19 patients, existence of intracranial hemorrhage should always be considered (Tab. 2, Ref. 21). Keywords: subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Aged , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/epidemiology
2.
Acta Neurochir (Wien) ; 164(2): 543-547, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516861

ABSTRACT

Several vaccines have been approved worldwide for the prevention of morbidity and mortality against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). However, the development of these vaccines has raised concerns regarding their adverse effects. Herein, we report the first case of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) due to vasculitis after the first dose of mRNA vaccine (BNT162b2, Pfizer/BioN-Tech). Although this case cannot demonstrate a direct relationship between COVID-19 vaccination and vasculitis, the clinical and histological features of this patient are highly consistent with the adverse effects of COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vasculitis , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic , Vasculitis/etiology
5.
Ann Neurol ; 90(4): 627-639, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318684

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to estimate the incidence of cerebral sinus and venous thrombosis (CVT) within 1 month from first dose administration and the frequency of vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) as the underlying mechanism after vaccination with BNT162b2, ChAdOx1, and mRNA-1273, in Germany. METHODS: A web-based questionnaire was e-mailed to all departments of neurology. We requested a report of cases of CVT occurring within 1 month of a COVID-19 vaccination. Other cerebral events could also be reported. Incidence rates of CVT were calculated by using official statistics of 9 German states. RESULTS: A total of 45 CVT cases were reported. In addition, 9 primary ischemic strokes, 4 primary intracerebral hemorrhages, and 4 other neurological events were recorded. Of the CVT patients, 35 (77.8%) were female, and 36 (80.0%) were younger than 60 years. Fifty-three events were observed after vaccination with ChAdOx1 (85.5%), 9 after BNT162b2 (14.5%) vaccination, and none after mRNA-1273 vaccination. After 7,126,434 first vaccine doses, the incidence rate of CVT within 1 month from first dose administration was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.38-0.78) per 100,000 person-months (which corresponds to a risk of CVT within the first 31 days of 0.55 per 100,000 individuals) for all vaccines and 1.52 (95% CI = 1.00-2.21) for ChAdOx1 (after 2,320,535 ChAdOx1 first doses). The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 9.68 (95% CI = 3.46-34.98) for ChAdOx1 compared to mRNA-based vaccines and 3.14 (95% CI = 1.22-10.65) for females compared to non-females. In 26 of 45 patients with CVT (57.8%), VITT was graded highly probable. INTERPRETATION: Given an incidence of 0.02 to 0.15 per 100,000 person-months for CVT in the general population, these findings point toward a higher risk for CVT after ChAdOx1 vaccination, especially for women. ANN NEUROL 2021;90:627-639.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Intracranial Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Intracranial Thrombosis/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 203: 106594, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121529

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cerebral microbleeds are increasingly reported in critical ill patients with respiratory failure in need of mechanical ventilation and/or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Typically, these critical illness-associated microbleeds involve the juxtacortical white matter and corpus callosum. Recently, this pattern was reported in patients with respiratory failure, suffering from COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective single-center study, we listed patients from March 11, 2020 to September 2, 2020, with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, critical illness and cerebral microbleeds. Literature research was conducted through a methodical search on Pubmed databases on critical illness-associated microbleeds and cerebral microbleeds described in patients with COVID-19. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: On 279 COVID-19 admissions, two cases of cerebral microbleeds were detected in critical ill patients with respiratory failure due to COVID-19. Based on review of existing literature critical illness-associated microbleeds tend to predominate in subcortical white matter and corpus callosum. Cerebral microbleeds in patients with COVID-19 tend to follow similar patterns as reported in critical illness-associated microbleeds. Hence, one patient with typical critical illness-associated microbleeds and COVID-19 is reported. However, a new pattern of widespread cortico-juxtacortical microbleeds, predominantly in the anterior vascular territory with relative sparing of deep gray matter, corpus callosum and infratentorial structures is documented in a second case. The possible etiologies of these microbleeds include hypoxia, hemorrhagic diathesis, brain endothelial erythrophagocytosis and/or cytokinopathies. An association with COVID-19 remains to be determined. CONCLUSION: Further systematic investigation of microbleed patterns in patients with neurological impairment and COVID-19 is necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnosis , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebral Hemorrhage/therapy , Critical Illness , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
8.
Stroke ; 51(12): 3719-3722, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050419

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Case series indicating cerebrovascular disorders in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been published. Comprehensive workups, including clinical characteristics, laboratory, electroencephalography, neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid findings, are needed to understand the mechanisms. METHODS: We evaluated 32 consecutive critically ill patients with COVID-19 treated at a tertiary care center from March 9 to April 3, 2020, for concomitant severe central nervous system involvement. Patients identified underwent computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and autopsy in case of death. RESULTS: Of 32 critically ill patients with COVID-19, 8 (25%) had severe central nervous system involvement. Two presented with lacunar ischemic stroke in the early phase and 6 with prolonged impaired consciousness after termination of analgosedation. In all but one with delayed wake-up, neuroimaging or autopsy showed multiple cerebral microbleeds, in 3 with additional subarachnoid hemorrhage and in 2 with additional small ischemic lesions. In 3 patients, intracranial vessel wall sequence magnetic resonance imaging was performed for the first time to our knowledge. All showed contrast enhancement of vessel walls in large cerebral arteries, suggesting vascular wall pathologies with an inflammatory component. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions for SARS-CoV-2 in cerebrospinal fluid were all negative. No intrathecal SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG synthesis was detectable. CONCLUSIONS: Different mechanisms of cerebrovascular disorders might be involved in COVID-19. Acute ischemic stroke might occur early. In a later phase, microinfarctions and vessel wall contrast enhancement occur, indicating small and large cerebral vessels involvement. Central nervous system disorders associated with COVID-19 may lead to long-term disabilities. Mechanisms should be urgently investigated to develop neuroprotective strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Arteries/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebrovascular Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/etiology , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Cerebrospinal Fluid/immunology , Cerebrospinal Fluid/virology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/cerebrospinal fluid , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Consciousness Disorders/etiology , Consciousness Disorders/physiopathology , Contrast Media , Critical Illness , Electroencephalography , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Switzerland , Tertiary Care Centers , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
11.
Neuroradiol J ; 34(2): 147-150, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975845

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a fatal cerebral haemorrhage in an 82-year-old male patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), who was taking prophylactic oral anticoagulation because of atrial fibrillation (rivaroxaban 20 mg q.d. for two years). On admission, the patient was deeply comatose, mechanically ventilated, with tachycardia up to 150 bpm, high blood pressure >210/120 mmHg and a body temperature >39°C. A computed tomography scan of the head showed a large intracerebral haemorrhage located in the deep structures of the right hemisphere, with a mass effect and bleeding to the ventricles. Rivaroxaban was discontinued at admission. The patient tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but he did not have typical symptoms of pneumonia. In the following days, the patient's neurological condition did not improve, and a fever of up to 40°C and abnormal coagulation parameters remained resistant to pharmacotherapy. The patient developed multi-system organ failure and died on day 8. Here, we review the recent literature and discuss the possible association of SARS-CoV-2-mediated endothelial injury and cardiovascular disorders with cerebrovascular complications. We postulate that anti-inflammatory treatment in COVID-19 and the stabilisation of endothelium functions can be particularly important in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Hypertension/complications , Rivaroxaban/adverse effects , Stroke/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Atrial Fibrillation/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/therapy , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Hypotension/etiology , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/etiology , Tachycardia/etiology
13.
Stroke Vasc Neurol ; 5(4): 315-322, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934125

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cerebral microhaemorrhages are increasingly being recognised as a complication of COVID-19. This observational retrospective study aims to further investigate the potential pathophysiology through assessing the pattern of microhaemorrhage and clinical characteristics of patients with COVID-19 and microhaemorrhage. By comparing with similar patterns of microhaemorrhage in other non-COVID-19 disease, this study aims to propose possible common pathogenic mechanisms. METHODS: A retrospective observational case series was performed identifying all patients with COVID-19 complicated by cerebral microhaemorrhage on MRI. The distribution and number of microhaemorrhages were recorded using the microbleed anatomical scale, and patients' baseline characteristics and salient test results were also recorded. RESULTS: Cerebral microhaemorrhages were noted to have a predilection for the corpus callosum, the juxtacortical white matter and brainstem. All patients had a preceding period of critical illness with respiratory failure and severe hypoxia necessitating intubation and mechanical ventilation. DISCUSSION: This study demonstrates a pattern of cerebral microhaemorrhage that is similar to the pattern reported in patients with non-COVID-19 related critical illness and other causes of severe hypoxia. This raises questions regarding whether microhaemorrhage occurs from endothelial dysfunction due the direct effect of SARS-CoV-2 infection or from the secondary effects of critical illness and hypoxia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Aged , Brain Stem/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Corpus Callosum/diagnostic imaging , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , White Matter/diagnostic imaging
14.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(12): 105419, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885361

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Apnea testing remains essential for the clinical evaluation of brain death determination. In patients who test positive for SARS-CoV-2, disconnecting the patient from the ventilator and introducing high flow oxygen into the endotracheal tube increases the risk for aerosolization of airway secretions and exposure of the examiner. METHODS: Case report of a patient with an intracerebral hemorrhage that evolved to significant cerebral edema and herniation, who underwent apnea test using a method involving a t-piece and an HME filter. RESULTS: Patient successfully pronounced brain dead using a safe method to minimize exposure to SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSION: At a time where healthcare workers are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19, the above described method is a safe process for apnea testing in declaration of brain death.


Subject(s)
Apnea/diagnosis , Brain Death/diagnosis , Brain Edema/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Encephalocele/etiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Apnea/etiology , Brain Edema/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnosis , Encephalocele/diagnosis , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
15.
J Neuroimaging ; 30(5): 593-597, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-840698

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Covid-19, initially described as a respiratory system's infection, is currently more and more recognized as a multiorganic disease, including neurological manifestations. There is growing evidence about a potential neuroinvasive role of SARS-CoV-2. The purpose of this study is to describe new findings, in the form of cerebral microbleeds affecting different brain structures, observed in MRIs of critically ill patients. METHODS: For this purpose, the MR images of 9 patients with a common pattern of abnormal findings (2 women/7 men; 55-79 years of age; mean age: 67.7 years) were depicted. All patients were tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and presented with delayed recovery of consciousness or important agitation, requiring brain MRI. RESULTS: All patients had suffered from severe (5/9) or moderate (4/9) acute respiratory distress syndrome, requiring prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. Their common MRI finding was the presence of microbleeds in unusual distribution with a specific predilection for the corpus callosum. Other uncommon locations of microbleeds were the internal capsule (5/9), as well as middle cerebellar peduncles (5/9). Subcortical regions were also affected in the majority of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Brain MRI raised evidence that Covid-19 or its related treatment may involve the brain with an unusual pattern of microbleeds, predominantly affecting the corpus callosum. The mechanism of this finding is still unclear but the differential diagnosis should include thrombotic microangiopathy related to direct or indirect-through the cytokine cascade-damage by the SARS-CoV-2 on the endothelium of brain's vessels, as well as mechanisms similar to the hypoxemia brain-blood-barrier injury.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Corpus Callosum , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Hypoxia , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 51(4): 953-960, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-784708

ABSTRACT

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) can be a devastating complication of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). We aimed to assess risk factors associated with ICH in this population. We performed a retrospective cohort study of adult patients admitted to NYU Langone Health system between March 1 and April 27 2020 with a positive nasopharyngeal swab polymerase chain reaction test result and presence of primary nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage or hemorrhagic conversion of ischemic stroke on neuroimaging. Patients with intracranial procedures, malignancy, or vascular malformation were excluded. We used regression models to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (OR, 95% CI) of the association between ICH and covariates. We also used regression models to determine association between ICH and mortality. Among 3824 patients admitted with COVID-19, 755 patients had neuroimaging and 416 patients were identified after exclusion criteria were applied. The mean (standard deviation) age was 69.3 (16.2), 35.8% were women, and 34.9% were on therapeutic anticoagulation. ICH occurred in 33 (7.9%) patients. Older age, non-Caucasian race, respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, and therapeutic anticoagulation were associated with ICH on univariate analysis (p < 0.01 for each variable). In adjusted regression models, anticoagulation use was associated with a five-fold increased risk of ICH (OR 5.26, 95% CI 2.33-12.24, p < 0.001). ICH was associated with increased mortality (adjusted OR 2.6, 95 % CI 1.2-5.9). Anticoagulation use is associated with increased risk of ICH in patients with COVID-19. Further investigation is required to elucidate underlying mechanisms and prevention strategies in this population.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnosis , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/mortality , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Male , Neuroimaging/methods , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United States/epidemiology
17.
Neuroradiol J ; 33(6): 528-531, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760511

ABSTRACT

A wide range of neurological complications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is increasingly recognised. Although the majority of these remain ischaemic and haemorrhagic events, various disorders are being reported. In particular, several cases of diffuse acute leukoencephalopathy have been observed in critically ill patients with COVID-19 disease. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with multiple comorbidities and severe COVID-19 pneumonia who developed a diffuse leukoencephalopathy with microhaemorrhages and extensive associated white matter necrosis. Although this is the first documented case of extensive COVID-19-associated white matter necrosis, we highlight the relatively constant features of this injury similar to previously reported cases, including symmetrical involvement of the supratentorial white matter, sparing of the peripheral subcortical regions except in the precentral gyri, frequently associated microhaemorrhages, relative sparing of the deep gray matter structures and infratentorial structures, and lack of enhancement.


Subject(s)
Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Leukoencephalopathies/diagnostic imaging , White Matter/diagnostic imaging , Bacteremia/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Candidemia/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Leukoencephalopathies/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Necrosis , Renal Dialysis , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , White Matter/pathology
18.
Neurologia (Engl Ed) ; 35(9): 621-627, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-759217

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We analysed the neurological complications of patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection who required intensive care unit (ICU) admission. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, observational, descriptive study of consecutive patients admitted to the ICU due to severe respiratory symptoms secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection between 1 April and 1 June 2020. RESULTS: We included 30 patients with neurological symptoms; 21 were men (72.40%), and mean age (standard deviation [SD]) was 57.41 years (11.61). The mean duration of ICU stay was 18.83 days (14.33). The neurological conditions recorded were acute confusional syndrome in 28 patients (93.33%), neuromuscular disease in 15 (50%), headache in 5 (16.66%), cerebrovascular disease in 4 (13.33%), and encephalopathies/encephalitis in 4 (13.33%). CSF analysis results were normal in 6 patients (20%). Brain MRI or head CT showed alterations in 20 patients (66.6%). EEG was performed in all patients (100%), with 8 (26.66%) showing abnormal findings. In 5 of the 15 patients with clinical myopathy, diagnosis was confirmed with electroneuromyography. We found a correlation between older age and duration of ICU stay (P=.002; 95%CI: 4.032-6.022; OR: 3,594). CONCLUSIONS: Severe COVID-19 mainly affects men, as observed in other series. Half of our patients presented acute myopathy, and almost all patients left the ICU with acute confusional syndrome, which fully resolved; no correlation was found with EEG or neuroimaging findings. Older age is associated with longer ICU stay.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Critical Illness , Muscular Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acute Disease , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Confusion/epidemiology , Confusion/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Muscular Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Neuroimaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
20.
Clin Imaging ; 68: 239-241, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733895

ABSTRACT

Neurologic complications of COVID-19 infection have been recently described and include dizziness, headache, loss of taste and smell, stroke, and encephalopathy. Brain MRI in these patients have revealed various findings including ischemia, hemorrhage, inflammation, and demyelination. In this article, we report a case of critical illness-associated cerebral microbleeds identified on MRI in a patient with severe COVID-19 infection and discuss the potential etiologies of these neuroimaging findings.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Critical Illness , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Stroke , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology
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