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1.
Anesth Analg ; 133(5): 1331-1341, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566542

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic interrupted the administration of the APPLIED Examination, the final part of the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) staged examination system for initial certification. In response, the ABA developed, piloted, and implemented an Internet-based "virtual" form of the examination to allow administration of both components of the APPLIED Exam (Standardized Oral Examination and Objective Structured Clinical Examination) when it was impractical and unsafe for candidates and examiners to travel and have in-person interactions. This article describes the development of the ABA virtual APPLIED Examination, including its rationale, examination format, technology infrastructure, candidate communication, and examiner training. Although the logistics are formidable, we report a methodology for successfully introducing a large-scale, high-stakes, 2-element, remote examination that replicates previously validated assessments.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Certification/methods , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Specialty Boards , Anesthesiology/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Certification/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Computer-Assisted Instruction/standards , Educational Measurement/standards , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/standards , Specialty Boards/standards , United States/epidemiology
3.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1149): 423-426, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247399

ABSTRACT

Little has been published regarding postgraduate assessments during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is an urgent need to graduate well-trained specialists including family physicians who play a key role in patient care. The successes and challenges encountered in mounting qualifying 2020 Family Medicine examinations during the COVID-19 pandemic at the University of the West Indies are described in this paper. Human resource, planning, use of technology and virtual environments are discussed, which enabled successful examinations at this multicampus regional site.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Certification , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Educational Measurement , Family Practice/education , Physicians, Family/standards , Academic Performance , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Certification/methods , Certification/standards , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Educational Status , Educational Technology/methods , Humans , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching/standards , Teaching/trends , West Indies
4.
J Trauma Nurs ; 28(3): 203-208, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216691

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The American College of Surgeons (ACS), Committee on Trauma, trauma center verification process is designed to help hospitals improve trauma care. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic social distancing restrictions, performing virtual site visits was piloted. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to describe the first pilot ACS pediatric trauma center virtual reverification visit performed in the United States. METHODS: This is a descriptive review of a 2020 pilot virtual Level I pediatric trauma center reverification visit. In-person site visit checklists were altered to adjust to the virtual format. All documents, prereview questionnaire, patient charts, and resource documents were prepared electronically. Collaboration with the departments of information technology, clinical education and informatics, and the general counsel's office prepared the infrastructure to allow reviewers access to protected health information. RESULTS: Multiple hospital departments collaborated to facilitate the transition to an electronic format. Organized virtual meeting room scheduling, communications, and coordination between the ACS staff, the reviewers, and the various hospital departments resulted in a successful virtual visit. CONCLUSION: Lessons learned and opportunities for improvement were identified for this first-ever pilot virtual pediatric trauma center reverification site visit. Once the information technology logistic questions were answered, allowing reviewers protected health information access, the general program and document preparation for a virtual trauma reverification site visit was similar to an in-person site visit. Although the review day agenda was similar, execution challenges were identified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Certification/standards , Guidelines as Topic , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/standards , Trauma Centers/standards , Virtual Reality , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
5.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(4): 850-860, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Regulatory oversight has been a central strategy to assure nursing home quality of care for decades. In response to COVID-19, traditional elements of oversight that relate to resident care have been curtailed in favor of implementing limited infection control surveys and targeted complaint investigations. We seek to describe the state of nursing home oversight during the pandemic to facilitate a discussion of whether and how these activities should be altered going forward. DESIGN AND SETTING: In a retrospective study, we describe national oversight activities in January-June 2020 and compare these activities to the same time period from 2019. We also examine state-level oversight activities during the peak months of the pandemic. PARTICIPANTS: United States nursing homes. DATA: Publicly available Quality, Certification, and Oversight Reports (QCOR) data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). MEASUREMENTS: Number of standard, complaint, and onsite infection surveys, number of deficiencies from standard and complaint surveys, number of citations by deficiency tag, and number and amount of civil monetary penalties. RESULTS: The number of standard and complaint surveys declined considerably in the second quarter of 2020 relative to the same time frame in 2019. Deficiency citations generally decreased to near zero by April 2020 with the exception of infection prevention and control deficiencies and citations for failure to report COVID-19 data to the national health safety network. Related enforcement actions were down considerably in 2020, relative to 2019. CONCLUSION: In the months since COVID-19 first impacted nursing homes, regulatory oversight efforts have fallen off considerably. While CMS implemented universal infection control surveys and targeted complaint investigations, other routine aspects of oversight dropped in light of justifiable limits on nursing home entry. Going forward, we must develop policies that allow regulators to balance the demands of the pandemic while fulfilling their responsibilities effectively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, U.S./statistics & numerical data , Infection Control , Mandatory Reporting , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Health Care/standards , Aged , Certification/standards , Female , Government Regulation , Humans , Retrospective Studies , United States
6.
J Surg Res ; 262: 240-243, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062498

ABSTRACT

As the SARS-COV-2 pandemic created the need for social distancing and the implementation of nonessential travel bans, residency and fellowship programs have moved toward a web-based virtual process for applicant interviews. As part of the Society of Asian Academic Surgeons 5th Annual Meeting, an expert panel was convened to provide guidance for prospective applicants who are new to the process. This article provides perspectives from applicants who have successfully navigated the surgical subspecialty fellowship process, as well as program leadership who have held virtual interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/methods , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Certification/organization & administration , Certification/standards , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/standards , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/standards , Physical Distancing , Social Interaction , Specialty Boards , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/standards
8.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 33(Supplement): S1-S9, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-769135

ABSTRACT

Family Medicine was a child of the 1960s. Triggered by compelling social need for care outside of large hospitals, Family Medicine emphasized access to personal physicians based in the community. As a protest movement, the ABFP required ongoing recertification for all Diplomates, with both independent examination and chart audit. Fifty years later, society and health care have changed dramatically, and it is time again to consider how Board Certification must respond to those change. We propose three interlocking arguments. First, even before COVID-19, health and health care have been in a time of fundamental transformation. Second, given the role Board Certification plays in supporting improvement of healthcare, Board Certification itself must respond to these changes. Third, to move forward, ABFM and the wider Board community must address a series of wicked problems - i.e., problems which are both complex-with many root causes-and complicated- in which interventions create new problems. The wicked problems confronting board certification include: 1) combining summative and formative assessment, 2) improving quality improvement and 3) reaffirming the social contract and professionalism and its assessment.


Subject(s)
Certification/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Family Practice/standards , Quality Improvement , Certification/methods , Certification/trends , Family Practice/education , Family Practice/trends , Humans , United States
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