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1.
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed ; 106(6): 627-634, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503592

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors associated with delivery room respiratory support in at-risk infants who are initially vigorous and received delayed cord clamping (DCC). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Two perinatal centres in Melbourne, Australia. PATIENTS: At-risk infants born at ≥35+0 weeks gestation with a paediatric doctor in attendance who were initially vigorous and received DCC for >60 s. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Delivery room respiratory support defined as facemask positive pressure ventilation, continuous positive airway pressure and/or supplemental oxygen within 10 min of birth. RESULTS: Two hundred and ninety-eight infants born at a median (IQR) gestational age of 39+3 (38+2-40+2) weeks were included. Cord clamping occurred at a median (IQR) of 128 (123-145) s. Forty-four (15%) infants received respiratory support at a median of 214 (IQR 156-326) s after birth. Neonatal unit admission for respiratory distress occurred in 32% of infants receiving delivery room respiratory support vs 1% of infants who did not receive delivery room respiratory support (p<0.001). Risk factors independently associated with delivery room respiratory support were average heart rate (HR) at 90-120 s after birth (determined using three-lead ECG), mode of birth and time to establish regular cries. Decision tree analysis identified that infants at highest risk had an average HR of <165 beats per minute at 90-120 s after birth following caesarean section (risk of 39%). Infants with an average HR of ≥165 beats per minute at 90-120 s after birth were at low risk (5%). CONCLUSIONS: We present a clinical decision pathway for at-risk infants who may benefit from close observation following DCC. Our findings provide a novel perspective of HR beyond the traditional threshold of 100 beats per minute.


Subject(s)
Critical Pathways/standards , Delivery, Obstetric , Electrocardiography/methods , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Umbilical Cord , Australia/epidemiology , Cesarean Section/adverse effects , Cesarean Section/methods , Clinical Decision-Making , Constriction , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/methods , Delivery, Obstetric/adverse effects , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Female , Gestational Age , Heart Rate , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/adverse effects , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/instrumentation , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , Time-to-Treatment/standards , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data
3.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 587, 2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371956

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused ongoing challenges in health services worldwide. Despite the growing body of literature on COVID-19, reports on perinatal care in COVID-19 cases are limited. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a case of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a 36-year-old G5/P2 pregnant woman with morbid obesity, confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection, and fulminant respiratory failure. At 28+ 1 gestational weeks, the patient delivered an uninfected newborn. Using ImmunoCAP ISAC® technology, we found no immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies, suggesting that no mother-to-child viral transmission occurred during pregnancy or delivery. The maternal respiratory state improved rapidly after delivery; both maternal and neonatal outcomes were encouraging given the early gestational age and fulminant course of respiratory failure in our patient. CONCLUSIONS: The management of ARDS in pregnant women with COVID-19 is complex and requires an individualized, multidisciplinary approach, while considering maternal and fetal outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cesarean Section/methods , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Fetal Monitoring/methods , Gestational Age , Humans , Obesity, Morbid/diagnosis , Obesity, Morbid/physiopathology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Perinatal Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/etiology , Premature Birth/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
6.
Korean J Anesthesiol ; 74(2): 169-174, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167845

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) was first reported in Wuhan, China, with Korea being subsequently exposed. In Korea, COVID-19 screening guidelines have been established in every hospital as an attempt to prevent its spread. There has been a previous report of a successful cesarean section of a confirmed mother; however, there remain no guidelines for suspected mothers. Cesarean section is often urgently operated without sufficient infection evaluations. We would like to suggest anesthetic management guidelines for cesarean section patients suspected of COVID-19. CASE: Our hospital, which is located in Daegu, Korea, was designated as a quarantine and delivery facility for suspected mothers. We performed the cesarean section on seven suspected mothers and one confirmed mother. CONCLUSIONS: This case report presents guidelines for infection control during surgery and anesthesia for cesarean section of mothers with suspected COVID-19 involving operating room preparation and protection strategy.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cesarean Section/methods , Infection Control/methods , Operating Rooms , Personal Protective Equipment , Adult , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(6): 614-621, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091441

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) among pregnant patients at the time of delivery in a rural Midwest tertiary care hospital and to examine demographics, clinical factors, and maternal and neonatal outcomes associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: This prospective cohort study included all delivering patients between May 1 and September 22, 2020 at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Plasma SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing was performed. SARS-CoV-2 viral reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results and maternal and neonatal outcomes were collected from the electronic medical record. Data were analyzed using univariate statistical methods with clustering for multiple births. RESULTS: In total, 1,000 patients delivered between May 1 and September 22, 2020. Fifty-eight (5.8%) were SARS-CoV-2 antibody positive. Twenty-three also tested viral positive during pregnancy. Three of 1,000 (0.3%) were viral positive on admission but antibody negative. The median age was 30 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 26-33 years) and body mass index was 31.75 kg/m2 (IQR 27.7-37.5 kg/m2). The cesarean delivery rate was 34.0%. The study population was primarily white (71.6%); however, 41.0% of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients identified as Black, 18.0% as Hispanic/Latino, 3.3% as Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, and only 27.9% as White (p < 0.0001). SARS-CoV-2 infection was more likely in patients without private insurance (p = 0.0243). Adverse maternal and/or neonatal outcomes were not more likely in patients with evidence of infection during pregnancy. Two SARS-CoV-2 infected patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. There were no maternal deaths during the study period. CONCLUSION: In this largely rural Midwest population, 6.1% of delivering patients had evidence of past or current SARS-CoV-2 infection. Rates of SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy were higher among racial and ethnic minorities and patients without private insurance. The SARS-CoV-2 infected patients and their neonates were not found to be at increased risk for adverse outcomes. KEY POINTS: · SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence rate in pregnant population in Iowa is 5.8%.. · Infections are higher among minorities, non-English speakers, and patients without private insurance.. · No increased adverse maternal/neonatal outcomes observed for SARS-CoV-2 infected mothers..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Cesarean Section , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnancy Outcome/ethnology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cesarean Section/methods , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Iowa/epidemiology , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Tertiary Healthcare/statistics & numerical data
10.
Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM ; 2(3): 100134, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064735

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has had an impact on healthcare systems around the world with 3 million people contracting the disease and 208,000 cases resulting in death as of this writing. Information regarding coronavirus infection in pregnancy is still limited. Objective: This study aimed to describe the clinical course of severe and critical coronavirus disease 2019 in hospitalized pregnant women with positive laboratory testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Study Design: This is a cohort study of pregnant women with severe or critical coronavirus disease 2019 hospitalized at 12 US institutions between March 5, 2020, and April 20, 2020. Severe disease was defined according to published criteria as patient-reported dyspnea, respiratory rate >30 per minute, blood oxygen saturation ≤93% on room air, ratio of partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen <300 mm Hg, or lung infiltrates >50% within 24-48 hours on chest imaging. Critical disease was defined as respiratory failure, septic shock, or multiple organ dysfunction or failure. Women were excluded from the study if they had presumed coronavirus disease 2019, but laboratory testing was negative. The primary outcome was median duration from hospital admission to discharge. Secondary outcomes included need for supplemental oxygen, intubation, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrest, death, and timing of delivery. The clinical courses are described by the median disease day on which these outcomes occurred after the onset of symptoms. Treatment and neonatal outcomes are also reported. Results: Of 64 hospitalized pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019, 44 (69%) had severe disease, and 20 (31%) had critical disease. The following preexisting comorbidities were observed: 25% had a pulmonary condition, 17% had cardiac disease, and the mean body mass index was 34 kg/m2. Gestational age was at a mean of 29±6 weeks at symptom onset and a mean of 30±6 weeks at hospital admission, with a median disease day 7 since first symptoms. Most women (81%) were treated with hydroxychloroquine; 7% of women with severe disease and 65% of women with critical disease received remdesivir. All women with critical disease received either prophylactic or therapeutic anticoagulation during their admission. The median duration of hospital stay was 6 days (6 days [severe group] and 10.5 days [critical group]; P=.01). Intubation was usually performed around day 9 on patients who required it, and peak respiratory support for women with severe disease was performed on day 8. In women with critical disease, prone positioning was required in 20% of cases, the rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome was 70%, and reintubation was necessary in 20%. There was 1 case of maternal cardiac arrest, but there were no cases of cardiomyopathy or maternal death. Thirty-two of 64 (50%) women with coronavirus disease 2019 in this cohort delivered during their hospitalization (34% [severe group] and 85% [critical group]). Furthermore, 15 of 17 (88%) pregnant women with critical coronavirus disease 2019 delivered preterm during their disease course, with 16 of 17 (94%) pregnant women giving birth through cesarean delivery; overall, 15 of 20 (75%) women with critical disease delivered preterm. There were no stillbirths or neonatal deaths or cases of vertical transmission. Conclusion: In pregnant women with severe or critical coronavirus disease 2019, admission into the hospital typically occurred about 7 days after symptom onset, and the duration of hospitalization was 6 days (6 [severe group] vs 12 [critical group]). Women with critical disease had a high rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and there was 1 case of cardiac arrest, but there were no cases of cardiomyopathy or maternal mortality. Hospitalization of pregnant women with severe or critical coronavirus disease 2019 resulted in delivery during the clinical course of the disease in 50% of this cohort, usually in the third trimester. There were no perinatal deaths in this cohort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cesarean Section/methods , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Maternal Mortality , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology
11.
Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM ; 2(3): 100130, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064733

ABSTRACT

Because the obstetrical population seems to have a high proportion of asymptomatic patients who are carriers of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, universal testing has been proposed as a strategy to risk-stratify all obstetrical admissions and guide infection prevention protocols. Here, we describe a case of a critically ill obstetrical patient with all the clinical symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 and 3 false-negative results of nasopharyngeal swabs for molecular testing. We review and discuss the uncertain clinical characteristics of current severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 molecular testing and the implications of false-negative results in the obstetrical population.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 , False Negative Reactions , Infection Control/methods , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cesarean Section/methods , Critical Care/methods , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Respiration, Artificial , Risk Adjustment/methods , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
12.
Semin Perinatol ; 44(7): 151277, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029866

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted obstetric anesthesiologists to reconsider the ways in which basic anesthesia care is provided on the Labor and Delivery Unit. Suggested modifications include an added emphasis on avoiding general anesthesia, a strong encouragement to infected individuals to opt for early neuraxial analgesia, and the prevention of emergent cesarean delivery, whenever possible. Through team efforts, adopting these measures can have real effects on reducing the transmission of the viral illness and maintaining patient and caregiver safety in the labor room.


Subject(s)
Analgesia, Obstetrical/methods , Anesthesia, Obstetrical/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Cesarean Section/methods , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Administration, Inhalation , Analgesia, Epidural/methods , Analgesia, Patient-Controlled , Analgesics, Opioid , Anesthesia, Epidural/methods , Anesthesia, Spinal/methods , Anesthetics, Inhalation , Anticoagulants , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Masks , Nitrous Oxide , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
13.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0244266, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992712

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate safety and effectiveness of clarithromycin as adjunctive antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing non-elective cesarean delivery in comparison with no macrolides, to adapt to azithromycin shortages in COVID-19 pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a multi-center, prospective observational cohort study from March 23, 2020 through June 1, 2020. We followed all women receiving either clarithromycin or no macrolide antibiotic for adjunct surgical prophylaxis for non-elective cesarean deliveries. The primary outcome was development of postpartum endometritis. Secondary outcomes included meconium-stained amniotic fluid at time of cesarean delivery, neonatal sepsis, neonatal intensive care unit admission, and neonatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. All patients in this study were tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection and resulted negative. RESULTS: This study included 240 patients, with 133 patients receiving clarithromycin and 107 patients receiving no adjunct macrolide prophylaxis. Patients receiving clarithromycin were noted to have significantly lower rates of postpartum endometritis as compared to those who did not receive adjunct prophylaxis (4.5% versus 11.2%, p = 0.025). In crude (unadjusted) analysis, a significantly lower risk of developing endometritis was noted in the clarithromycin group as compared to the control group (66% decreased risk, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.95, p = 0.040). When adjusted for perceived confounders, a significant difference was again noted (67% decreased risk, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.97, p = 0.034). Stratified analysis of significantly different demographic factors including Black race, BMI, and age was performed. A significantly decreased risk of development of endometritis when taking clarithromycin versus no adjunct macrolide was noted for Black race women in crude and adjusted models (crude: 87% decreased risk, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.83, p = 0.032; adjusted: 91% decreased risk, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.79, p = 0.026). This was also noted for women aged 18-29 years in crude and adjusted models (crude: model, 79% decreased risk, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.80, p = 0.014; adjusted model: 75% decreased risk, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.94, p = 0.028). All other stratified analyses did not yield significant differences in endometritis risk. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that administration of clarithromycin for adjunctive surgical prophylaxis for non-elective cesarean deliveries may be a safe option that may provide suitable endometritis prophylaxis in cases where azithromycin is unavailable, as was the case during the start of COVID-19 pandemic, most especially for Black race women and women ages 18-29 years.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antibiotic Prophylaxis , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Cesarean Section/methods , Clarithromycin/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Drug Substitution , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Young Adult
14.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(4): 332-341, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962245

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to review the published literature to determine mode of delivery in pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the indications reported for cesarean section early in the pandemic to add information to the current narrative and raise awareness of trends discovered. STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review was conducted by searching PubMed, Scopus, and ScienceDirect databases for articles published between December 2019 and April 29, 2020 using a combination of the keywords such as COVID-19, coronavirus 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), pregnancy, vaginal delivery, cesarean section, vertical transmission, management, and guidelines. Peer-reviewed case studies with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 women who delivered were included to determine mode of delivery, indications for cesarean section, and maternal and neonatal characteristics. RESULTS: A review of 36 total articles revealed deliveries in 203 SARS-CoV-2 positive pregnant women. A comparable severity of disease in pregnant versus nonpregnant women was noted, as previously determined. Overall, 68.9% of women delivered via cesarean section, with COVID-19 status alone being a common indication. Maternal COVID-19 may also be associated with increased risk of preterm labor, although neonatal outcomes were generally favorable. Despite eight of 206 newborns testing positive for SARS-CoV-2, there remains no definitive evidence of vertical transmission. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 status alone became a common indication for cesarean delivery early in the pandemic, despite lack of evidence for vertical transmission. The increase in cesarean rate in this data may reflect obstetricians attempting to serve their patients in the best way possible given the current climate of constantly evolving guidelines on safest mode of delivery for the mother, infant, and provider. Upholding current recommendations from trusted organizations as new data are published, while also providing individualized support to expecting mothers on most appropriate mode of delivery, will reduce the amount of unnecessary, unplanned cesarean sections and could lessen the psychological impact of delivering during the COVID-19 pandemic. KEY POINTS: · COVID-19 may result in an increased rate of cesarean delivery for SARS-CoV-2 positive pregnant women.. · COVID-19 is a commonly reported indication for cesarean section, despite management guidelines urging against this.. · Although eight neonates tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, all additional fluid and tissue samples tested negative..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery, Obstetric , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cesarean Section/methods , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Outcome , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Rev Bras Ginecol Obstet ; 42(10): 669-671, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894449

ABSTRACT

The present report describes the case of a 31-year-old primigravida, with dichorionic twins at 31 weeks. She presented with history of myalgia, jaundice, and abdominal discomfort. No flu-like symptoms as fever or cough. She was not aware of exposure to COVID-19. Normal blood pressure and O2 saturation. Laboratory tests showed platelet count of 218,000 mm3, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) 558 IU and serum creatinine 2.3 mg/dl. Doppler ultrasound in one twin was compatible with brain sparing. Partial hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome was the hypothesis, and a cesarean section was performed. On day 2, the white-cell count reached 33,730, with decreased consciousness and mild respiratory distress. Tomography revealed both lungs with ground-glass opacities. Swab for COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive. Thrombocytopenia in patients with COVID-19 appears to be multifactorial, similar to what occurs in preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. We assume that the synergism of these pathophysiological mechanisms could accelerate the compromise of maternal conditions and could be a warning to the obstetric practice.


O presente relato descreve o caso de uma gestante de 31 anos, gemelar dicoriônica com 31 semanas, com queixa de mialgia, icterícia e desconforto abdominal. A paciente não apresentava sintomas gripais como febre ou tosse e não tinha conhecimento de exposição ao COVID-19. Pressão arterial e saturação de oxigênio normais. Os exames laboratoriais apresentaram contagem de plaquetas de 218,000 mm3, ALT 558 IU e creatinina 2.3 mg/dl. Doppler compatível com centralização de um dos fetos. Síndrome de hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count (HELLP) parcial foi a hipótese diagnóstica inicial e a cesariana foi realizada. No segundo dia, a paciente apresentou leucócitos de 33.730 com queda do nível de consciência e desconforto respiratório leve. A tomografia revelou opacidade pulmonar em vidro fosco bilateralmente. A pesquisa de COVID-19 por polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/swab teve resultado positivo. Trombocitopenia em pacientes com COVID-19 é multifatorial, semelhante ao que ocorre na pré-eclâmpsia e na síndrome HELLP. Acreditamos que o sinergismo da fisiopatologia das doenças em questão pode acelerar o comprometimento materno e deve servir de alerta para a prática obstétrica.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , HELLP Syndrome/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Outcome , Adult , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Cesarean Section/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy, Twin , Thrombocytopenia/diagnosis , Ultrasonography, Prenatal
16.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(1): 82-87, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-872760

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe two cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in pregnant women requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and resulting in premature delivery. STUDY DESIGN: The clinical course of two women hospitalized with ARDS due to COVID-19 care in our intensive care (ICU) is summarized; both participants provided consent to be included in this case series. RESULTS: Both women recovered with no clinical sequelae. Neonatal outcomes were within the realm of expected for prematurity with the exception of coagulopathy. There was no vertical transmission to the neonates. CONCLUSION: This case series highlights that ECMO is a feasible treatment in the pregnant woman with severe COVID-19 and that delivery can be performed safely on ECMO with no additional risk to the fetus. While ECMO carries its natural risks, it should be considered a viable option during pregnancy and the postpartum period. KEY POINTS: · COVID-19 may present with a more severe course in pregnancy.. · ECMO may be used in pregnant woman with severe COVID-19.. · Delivery can be performed on ECMO without added fetal risk..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cesarean Section/methods , Critical Care/methods , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Obesity/diagnosis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Risk Adjustment/methods , Treatment Outcome
17.
J Med Case Rep ; 14(1): 186, 2020 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-818136

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A novel coronavirus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, was first reported in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. The virus, known as COVID-19, is recognized as a potentially life-threatening disease by causing severe respiratory disease. Since this virus has not previously been detected in humans, there is a paucity of information regarding its effects on humans. In addition, only limited or no information exists about its impact during pregnancy. CASE PRESENTATION: In the present case study, we report the death of a neonate born to a 32-year-old mother with coronavirus disease 2019 in Ilam, Iran, with Kurdish ethnicity. We report the infection and death of a neonate in Iran with a chest X-ray (CXR) marked abnormality 2 hours after birth demonstrating coronavirus disease 2019 disease. The neonate was born by elective cesarean section, the fetal health was assessed using fetal heart rate and a non-stress test before the birth, and there was no evidence of fetal distress. All the above-mentioned facts and radiographic abnormalities suggested that coronavirus disease 2019 is involved. CONCLUSIONS: In this case study, we report the death of a neonate born to a mother with coronavirus disease 2019, 11 hours after birth. There is a paucity of data on the vertical transmission and the adverse maternal-fetal consequences of this disease, so vertical transmission from mother to child remains to be confirmed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care/methods , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , COVID-19 , Cesarean Section/methods , Clinical Deterioration , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/physiopathology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/therapy , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Iran , Neonatal Screening/methods , Perinatal Death , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/methods , SARS-CoV-2
18.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 20(1): 587, 2020 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-818079

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are no published cases of tonic-clonic seizures and posterior bilateral blindness during pregnancy and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus (COV) 2 (SARS-COV-2) infection. We do not just face new and unknown manifestations, but also how different patient groups are affected by SARS-COV-2 infection, such as pregnant women. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), preeclampsia, eclampsia and posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy share endothelium damage and similar pathophysiology. CASE PRESENTATION: A 35-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for tonic-clonic seizures and SARS-COV-2 infection. She had a normal pregnancy control and no other symptoms before tonic-clonic seizures development. After a Caesarean section (C-section) she developed high blood pressure, and we initiated antihypertensive treatment with labetalol, amlodipine and captopril. Few hours later she developed symptoms of cortical blindness that resolved in 72 h with normal brain computed tomography (CT) angiography. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that SARS COV-2 infection could promote brain endothelial damage and facilitate neurological complications during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
Antihypertensive Agents/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Blindness, Cortical , Cesarean Section/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Eclampsia , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Seizures , Adult , Blindness, Cortical/diagnosis , Blindness, Cortical/virology , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 , Computed Tomography Angiography/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Diagnosis, Differential , Eclampsia/diagnosis , Eclampsia/therapy , Eclampsia/virology , Female , Humans , Neurologic Examination/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/etiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Outcome , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/diagnosis , Seizures/etiology , Seizures/therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Treatment Outcome
20.
Br J Anaesth ; 125(6): 895-911, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-747250

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Current guidelines for perioperative management of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) are mainly based on extrapolated evidence or expert opinion. We aimed to systematically investigate how COVID-19 affects perioperative management and clinical outcomes, to develop evidence-based guidelines. METHODS: First, we conducted a rapid literature review in EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science (January 1 to July 1, 2020), using a predefined protocol. Second, we performed a retrospective cohort analysis of 166 women undergoing Caesarean section at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan during the COVID-19 pandemic. Demographic, imaging, laboratory, and clinical data were obtained from electronic medical records. RESULTS: The review identified 26 studies, mainly case reports/series. One large cohort reported greater mortality in elective surgery patients diagnosed after, rather than before surgery. Higher 30 day mortality was associated with emergency surgery, major surgery, poorer preoperative condition and surgery for malignancy. Regional anaesthesia was favoured in most studies and personal protective equipment (PPE) was generally used by healthcare workers (HCWs), but its use was poorly described for patients. In the retrospective cohort study, duration of surgery, oxygen therapy and hospital stay were longer in suspected or confirmed patients than negative patients, but there were no differences in neonatal outcomes. None of the 262 participating HCWs was infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) when using level 3 PPE perioperatively. CONCLUSIONS: When COVID-19 is suspected, testing should be considered before non-urgent surgery. Until further evidence is available, HCWs should use level 3 PPE perioperatively for suspected or confirmed patients, but research is needed on its timing and specifications. Further research must examine longer-term outcomes. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: CRD42020182891 (PROSPERO).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Perioperative Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Anesthesia, Conduction , COVID-19 , Cesarean Section/methods , Cesarean Section/mortality , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/mortality , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Length of Stay , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnancy Outcome , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
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