Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 105
Filter
1.
Ann Palliat Med ; 11(6): 2093-2099, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1939530

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Blood samples from 42 patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with varying degrees of infection were examined to further explore the relationship between clinical features, immune factors and COVID-19, as well as the diagnostic and predictive values of clinical features and immune factors in severe disease progression. METHODS: This study included 42 nucleic acid-positive COVID-19 patients admitted to the First Hospital of Jiaxing from January 26, 2020 to February 21, 2020, who were divided into mild-moderate group and severe group based on respiratory rate, resting oxygen saturation and alveolar oxygen partial pressure/O2 inhalation. On February 21, 2020, clinical data including sex, age, body mass index (BMI), past medical history, clinical symptoms, hematology indexes [white blood cell (WBC); neutrophil (NEUT); lymphocyte (LYM); C-reactive protein (CRP)] were collected. The chi-square test was used to compare the clinical data differences between the two groups, so as to perform comparative analysis in the context of serious disease development. RESULTS: There were 8 cases of severe disease, and 34 cases of mild and moderate symptoms. Comparative analysis showed that patients with advanced age (≥60 years, OR =5.800, P=0.0286), history of hypertension (OR =5.800, P=0.0286) and pulmonary lobe lesions (≥4, OR =6.273, P=0.0270) were more likely to develop serious diseases. In addition, according to clinical symptoms, chest pain was more prominent in patients with severe disease. Laboratory tests showed that levels of WBC (severe 4.96±1.76 vs. mild-moderate 5.45±2.01, P=0.5300), NEUT (severe 3.56±1.44 vs. mild-moderate 3.94±1.87, P=0.5945) and LYM (severe 0.91±0.25 vs. mild-moderate 1.11±0.51, P=0.2903) were normal or decreased, but CRP level (severe 31.03±9.38 vs. mild-moderate 12.53±15.73, P=0.0029) was obviously increased, especially in patients with severe disease, with statistically significant difference between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with hypertension and advanced age are more likely to develop deteriorate with COVID-19, and the number of lung lobes with lesions and chest pain may indicate disease progression. Notably, CRP level is significantly elevated in severe disease and it may be closely related to COVID-19 progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Chest Pain , Disease Progression , Humans , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 257(3): 241-249, 2022 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917073

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) causes a variety of pain symptoms in the acute phase. Severe chest pain suddenly occurs even without abnormalities on examination and is sometimes refractory to analgesics. Such pain is a clinical concern in care facilities with limited resources, and this is the first report on the use of saikanto for its treatment. In Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, COVID-19 patients with mild symptoms were admitted to a hotel that operated as an isolation facility, and their symptoms were observed. In this article, we report four cases in which chest pain comorbid with mild to moderate COVID-19 was successfully treated with saikanto, a traditional Japanese (Kampo) medicine. The patients presented with chest pain and underwent medical examination at the facility. Two patients had severe chest pain refractory to acetaminophen. Critical cardiopulmonary diseases were ruled out in all the patients, and three patients had features of pneumonia on chest radiograph. Medications, including saikanto, were administered to the patients. The patients' chest pain and other symptoms improved 1-4 days after the administration of saikanto, and they left the care facility without hospitalization. The cause of the chest pain experienced by these patients is unclear, but we speculate that it could be minimal pleural inflammation or neuropathy. Previous pharmacological studies have suggested anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of the crude drugs that constitute saikanto. This case report suggests that saikanto could be a treatment option for chest pain refractory to analgesics in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Chest Pain/complications , Humans , Japan , Medicine, Kampo
3.
Am J Emerg Med ; 58: 235-244, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914107

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute chest syndrome (ACS) in sickle cell disease (SCD) is a serious condition that carries with it a high rate of morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: This review highlights the pearls and pitfalls of ACS in SCD, including diagnosis and management in the emergency department (ED) based on current evidence. DISCUSSION: ACS is defined by respiratory symptoms and/or fever and a new radiodensity on chest imaging in a patient with SCD. There are a variety of inciting causes, including infectious and non-infectious etiologies. Although ACS is more common in those with homozygous SCD, clinicians should consider ACS in all SCD patients, as ACS is a leading cause of death in SCD. Patients typically present with or develop respiratory symptoms including fever, cough, chest pain, and shortness of breath, which can progress to respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in 20% of adult patients. However, the initial presentation can vary. While the first line imaging modality is classically chest radiograph, lung ultrasound has demonstrated promise. Further imaging to include computed tomography may be necessary. Management focuses on analgesia, oxygen supplementation, incentive spirometry, bronchodilators, rehydration, antibiotics, consideration for transfusion, and specialist consultation. Empiric antibiotics that cover atypical pathogens are necessary along with measures to increase oxygen-carrying capacity in those with hypoxemia such as simple transfusion or exchange transfusion. CONCLUSIONS: An understanding of ACS can assist emergency clinicians in diagnosing and managing this potentially deadly disease.


Subject(s)
Acute Chest Syndrome , Anemia, Sickle Cell , Acute Chest Syndrome/diagnosis , Acute Chest Syndrome/epidemiology , Acute Chest Syndrome/etiology , Acute Disease , Adult , Anemia, Sickle Cell/complications , Anemia, Sickle Cell/epidemiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Chest Pain/etiology , Fever/etiology , Humans , Prevalence
4.
Chest ; 162(1): e33-e36, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1906855

ABSTRACT

CASE PRESENTATION: A 27-year-old accountant came to the ED with difficulty walking and progressive weakness of both lower limbs for 4 days' duration. He did not report a history of trauma or fall. He demonstrated no vertigo, headache, neck or back pain, disturbed vision, loss of weight, or weakness in upper limbs. He also reported difficulty breathing, fever, severe abdominal pain, and loose stools of 1 day's duration. His recorded maximum temperature at home was 38.3 °C. The fever subsided with oral paracetamol 500 mg. He did not report having weakness in any limb before the current presentation. He did not have comorbid diabetes mellitus or hypertension. Thirty days before presentation, he experienced fever, cough, and rhinorrhea and received a diagnosis of COVID-19 after reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction testing. At that time, symptoms had been minimal, vitals signs and chest radiography findings were normal, and he had undergone home isolation. He had maintained an oxygen saturation of 98% to 99% as measured on pulse oximetry. He had not received any treatment at that time. His symptoms had lasted for 7 days, and he remained asymptomatic up to the current presentation with paraparesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Chest Pain , Cough , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/etiology , Fever , Humans , Male
5.
N Engl J Med ; 386(23): 2222-2231, 2022 06 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1890344
6.
Minerva Cardiol Angiol ; 70(2): 273-284, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884909

ABSTRACT

Myocarditis is an inflammatory heart muscle disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentation and outcome. Clinical heterogeneity of myocarditis, ranging from acute onset chest pain with electrocardiographic changes resembling an acute coronary syndrome, to arrhythmic storm and chronic decompensated heart failure, makes diagnosis challenging. However, a correct diagnosis is fundamental to proper patients' management and should always be seeked. Although a definite diagnosis is only provided by endomyocardial biopsy, the European Society of Cardiology task force on myocardial and pericardial diseases provided specific criteria for the diagnosis of clinically suspected myocarditis, which has been facilitated by the advent of noninvasive imaging tests (i.e. cardiovascular magnetic resonance based myocardial tissue characterization). Due to the heterogeneous presentation and disease course of myocarditis, a tailored treatment would be the best strategy, but a standardized management is still not available. However, over the years, new, promising therapies, such as antiviral and immune-suppressive treatment, have come side by side to the standard pharmacological heart treatment, i.e. antiheart failure medications. In this paper we will review the basic principles of myocarditis management in clinical practice, including diagnostic work-up, conventional and disease-specific therapy and patients' follow-up.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Myocarditis , Biopsy/methods , Chest Pain/pathology , Disease Progression , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Myocarditis/pathology , Myocarditis/therapy , Myocardium/pathology
7.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 23(5): 290-303, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883852

ABSTRACT

In the past 20 years, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has become a pivotal technique for the noninvasive diagnostic workup of coronary and cardiac diseases. Continuous technical and methodological improvements, combined with fast growing scientific evidence, have progressively expanded the clinical role of CCT. Randomized clinical trials documented the value of CCT in increasing the cost-effectiveness of the management of patients with acute chest pain presenting in the emergency department, also during the pandemic. Beyond the evaluation of stents and surgical graft patency, the anatomical and functional coronary imaging have the potential to guide treatment decision-making and planning for complex left main and three-vessel coronary disease. Furthermore, there has been an increasing demand to use CCT for preinterventional planning in minimally invasive procedures, such as transcatheter valve implantation and mitral valve repair. Yet, the use of CCT as a roadmap for tailored electrophysiological procedures has gained increasing importance to assure maximum success. In the meantime, innovations and advanced postprocessing tools have generated new potential applications of CCT from the simple coronary anatomy to the complete assessment of structural, functional and pathophysiological biomarkers of cardiac disease. In this complex and revolutionary scenario, it is urgently needed to provide an updated guide for the appropriate use of CCT in different clinical settings. This manuscript, endorsed by the Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC) and the Italian Society of Medical and Interventional Radiology (SIRM), represents the second of two consensus documents collecting the expert opinion of cardiologists and radiologists about current appropriate use of CCT.


Subject(s)
Cardiology , Cardiomyopathies , Heart Diseases , Neoplasms , Chest Pain , Coronary Artery Bypass , Humans , Radiology, Interventional , Stents , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
8.
Eur J Med Res ; 27(1): 80, 2022 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 has been the main tool to contain the pandemic. The rush development of the 3 vaccines and their expedited approval have led to inoculation of millions of patients around the world, leading to a containment of the disease. Despite continuous viral mutations and the identification of weaker variants, the severity of the infections has been mild, with many patients being either asymptomatic or recovering at home. Currently the focus has shifted from the host of organ damage related to the infection to potential side effects of the vaccine. Myocarditis has been reported as one of the potential side effects from the mRNA vaccine, affecting young healthy individuals. Up to September 30, 2021, 1.243 cases of myocarditis after vaccination with BNT162b2 Comirnaty© were registered in young adults by the Paul-Ehrlich-Institute in Germany alone. The exact pathophysiology and the risk factors for myocarditis following vaccination remain unclear. We present a case series of eight patients with cardiac symptom shortly after SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination (BNT162b6, Biontech, Comirnaty© or mRNA-1237 Moderna, Spikevax©). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eight patients between 13 and 56 years of age, vaccinated with either BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273 mRNA vaccine between January and August 2021 developed cardiac side effects shortly after either their first or second dose of the vaccine. Clinical data were retrieved from the clinical information system and analyzed. To support diagnosis of myocarditis or pericarditis, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed shortly after the onset of symptoms, with further investigations in severe cases. Symptoms were defined as dyspnea, chest pain and cardiac arrhythmia as determined by electrocardiography. RESULTS: Eight patients (5 males and 3 females) developed cardiac symptoms compatible with myocarditis, according to the CDC criteria, shortly after SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination. Three patients (2 males, 1 female) required hospitalization due to severe chest pain and elevated troponin levels. All patients recovered fully within 7 days from the symptom onset. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that cardiac adverse events such as myocarditis or pericarditis shortly after SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination are rare but possible and occur particularly in male patients.


Subject(s)
BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Vaccination , mRNA Vaccines , Adolescent , Adult , BNT162 Vaccine/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chest Pain , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myocarditis/chemically induced , Pericarditis/chemically induced , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Young Adult , mRNA Vaccines/adverse effects
9.
Clin Cardiol ; 45(7): 691-700, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1872142

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic with over 266 million cases and 5 million deaths worldwide. Anti-COVID-19 vaccinations have had exceptional success in subduing the incidence, prevalence, and disease severity of COVID-19, but rare cases of myocarditis have been reported after COVID-19 vaccinations. HYPOTHESIS: Myocarditis occurring after COVID-19 mRNA vaccinations have distinguishable clinical characteristics. They usually have a favorable prognosis. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search on PUBMED and MEDLINE database from inception to December 5, 2021. Studies were analyzed based on predetermined eligibility criteria. RESULTS: A total of 57 studies containing 275 cases of COVID-19 vaccine-associated myocarditis were catalogued. Mean age was 26.7 years and male to female ratio was 14:1. For 86.9% of patients, myocarditis occurred after the second dose. Average time to onset and length of hospitalization were 3.7 and 3.9 days, respectively. Prognosis was largely benign, but there was a 1.1% reported mortality. Chest pain (95.2%), elevation of troponin (100%), and ST elevation on electrocardiography (68.5%) were common. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (81.4%) were the most used medication, followed by colchicine (33.1%). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COVID-19 vaccine-associated myocarditis are usually younger males presenting with chest pain 3-4 days after receiving their second dose of COVID vaccine. Diagnosis is made by exclusion of all other etiologies. Given significant population benefit from COVID-19 vaccination, physicians should continue to encourage vaccination while remaining vigilant of the very rare occurrence of myocarditis following COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Chest Pain/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Myocarditis/epidemiology , Myocarditis/etiology , RNA, Messenger , Vaccination/adverse effects
10.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e055123, 2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868733

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Identifying and excluding coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with atypical angina pectoris (AP) and non-specific thoracic complaints is a challenge for general practitioners (GPs). A diagnostic and prognostic tool could help GPs in determining the likelihood of CAD and guide patient management. Studies in outpatient settings have shown that the CT-based coronary calcium score (CCS) has high accuracy for diagnosis and exclusion of CAD. However, the CT CCS test has not been tested in a primary care setting. In the COroNary Calcium scoring as fiRst-linE Test to dEtect and exclude coronary artery disease in GPs patients with stable chest pain (CONCRETE) study, the impact of direct access of GPs to CT CCS will be investigated. We hypothesise that this will allow for early diagnosis of CAD and treatment, more efficient referral to the cardiologist and a reduction of healthcare-related costs. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: CONCRETE is a pragmatic multicentre trial with a cluster randomised design, in which direct GP access to the CT CCS test is compared with standard of care. In both arms, at least 40 GP offices, and circa 800 patients with atypical AP and non-specific thoracic complaints will be included. To determine the increase in detection and treatment rate of CAD in GP offices, the CVRM registration rate is derived from the GPs electronic registration system. Individual patients' data regarding cardiovascular risk factors, expressed chest pain complaints, quality of life, downstream testing and CAD diagnosis will be collected through questionnaires and the electronic GP dossier. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: CONCRETE has been approved by the Medical Ethical Committee of the University Medical Center of Groningen. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NTR 7475; Pre-results.


Subject(s)
Coronary Artery Disease , General Practitioners , Angina Pectoris/complications , Angina Pectoris/diagnosis , Calcium , Chest Pain/diagnosis , Chest Pain/etiology , Coronary Angiography/methods , Coronary Artery Disease/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnosis , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pragmatic Clinical Trials as Topic , Predictive Value of Tests , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
11.
Chest ; 161(5): e299-e304, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866966

ABSTRACT

CASE PRESENTATION: A 31-year-old Asian male never-smoker living in the upper Midwest with a past medical history of congenital bilateral hearing loss sought treatment with a 1-week history of fever, fatigue, right-sided pleuritic chest pain, shortness of breath, productive cough with mild intermittent hemoptysis, night sweats, and unintentional 10-lb weight loss over 4 weeks. He was adopted from South Korea as an infant, and thus the family history was unknown. He worked in the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning business, performing installations and repairs. There was no known exposure to animals, caves, rivers, lakes, or wooded areas. He travelled to South Korea and New Hampshire approximately 9 months previously. He did not take any medication.


Subject(s)
Chest Pain , Mediastinal Diseases , Chest Pain/diagnosis , Chest Pain/etiology , Cough/diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/etiology , Humans , Male , Mediastinal Diseases/diagnosis
12.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 22(1): 242, 2022 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865278

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak represents a significant challenge to international health. Several studies have reported a substantial decrease in the number of patients attending emergency departments with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and there has been a concomitant rise in early mortality or complications during the COVID-19 pandemic. A modified management system that emphasizes nearby treatment, safety, and protection, alongside a closer and more effective multiple discipline collaborative team was developed by our Chest Pain Center at an early stage of the pandemic. It was therefore necessary to evaluate whether the newly adopted management strategies improved the clinical outcomes of ACS patients in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Patients admitted to our Chest Pain Center from January 25th to April 30th, 2020 based on electronic data in the hospitals ACS registry, were included in the COVID-19 group. Patients admitted during the same period (25 January to 30 April) in 2019 were included in the pre-COVID-19 group. The characteristics and clinical outcomes of the ACS patients in the COVID-19 period group were compared with those of the ACS patients in the pre-COVID-19 group. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify the risk factors associated with clinical outcomes. RESULTS: The number of patients presenting to the Chest Pain Center was reduced by 45% (p = 0.01) in the COVID-19 group, a total of 223 ACS patients were included in the analysis. There was a longer average delay from the onset of symptom to first medical contact (FMC) (1176.9 min vs. 625.2 min, p = 0.001) in the COVID-19 period group compared to the pre-COVID-19 group. Moreover, immediate percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (80.1% vs. 92.3%, p = 0.008) was performed less frequently on ACS patients in the COVID-19 group compared to the pre-COVID-19 group. However, more ACS patients received thrombolytic therapy (5.8% vs. 0.6%, p = 0.0052) in the COVID-19 group than observed in the pre-COVID-19 group. Interestingly, clinical outcome did not worsen in the COVID-19 group when cardiogenic shock, sustained ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation or use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) were compared against the pre-COVID-19 group (13.5% vs. 11.6%, p = 0.55). Only age was independently associated with composite clinical outcomes (HR = 1.3; 95% CI 1.12-1.50, p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: This retrospective study showed that the adverse outcomes were not different during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to historical control data, suggesting that newly adopted management strategies might provide optimal care for ACS patients. Larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods on this issue are needed in the future.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Acute Coronary Syndrome/diagnosis , Acute Coronary Syndrome/epidemiology , Acute Coronary Syndrome/therapy , Chest Pain/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies
13.
JCI Insight ; 7(10)2022 05 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861744

ABSTRACT

Shortness of breath, chest pain, and palpitations occur as postacute sequelae of COVID-19, but whether symptoms are associated with echocardiographic abnormalities, cardiac biomarkers, or markers of systemic inflammation remains unknown. In a cross-sectional analysis, we assessed symptoms, performed echocardiograms, and measured biomarkers among adults more than 8 weeks after confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. We modeled associations between symptoms and baseline characteristics, echocardiographic findings, and biomarkers using logistic regression. We enrolled 102 participants at a median of 7.2 months following COVID-19 onset; 47 individuals reported dyspnea, chest pain, or palpitations. Median age was 52 years, and 41% of participants were women. Female sex, hospitalization, IgG antibody against SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain, and C-reactive protein were associated with symptoms. Regarding echocardiographic findings, 4 of 47 participants (9%) with symptoms had pericardial effusions compared with 0 of 55 participants without symptoms; those with effusions had a median of 4 symptoms compared with a median of 1 symptom in those without effusions. There was no strong evidence for a relationship between symptoms and echocardiographic functional parameters or other biomarkers. Among adults more than 8 weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection, SARS-CoV-2 RBD antibodies, markers of inflammation, and, possibly, pericardial effusions are associated with cardiopulmonary symptoms. Investigation into inflammation as a mechanism underlying postacute sequelae of COVID-19 is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pericardial Effusion , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Chest Pain/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Inflammation , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMC Emerg Med ; 22(1): 57, 2022 04 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1840948

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020, reports emerged on decreasing emergency department (ED) visits in many countries. Patients experiencing chest pain was no exception. The aim of the current study was to describe how the Covid-19 pandemic and the subsequential lockdown impacted the chest pain population in a Norwegian ED. METHODS: All patients presenting to the ED with chest pain during the study period were included. Data were collected retrospectively from the time period January 6th to August 30th, 2020, and compared to the corresponding period in 2019, assessing variations in the number of ED visits, severity, gender, and age. RESULTS: Fewer patients with chest pain were seen in the ED following the national lockdown in Norway, compared to the corresponding 2019 period (week 13: 38% fewer; weeks 11-27: 16% fewer). By week 28, the rate normalized compared to 2019 levels. There was a relative increase in lower acuity patients among these patients, while fewer moderate acuity patients were seen. During the initial period following lockdown, the median age was lower compared to the corresponding 2019 period (58 years (IQR 25) vs 62 years (IQR 24), respectively). Admissions due to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) remained proportionally stable. CONCLUSIONS: Succeeding the Covid-19 outbreak and the subsequent national lockdown in Norway, fewer chest pain patients presented to the ED. Paradoxically, the patients seemed to be less severely ill and were on average younger compared to 2019 data. However, the proportion of patients admitted with ACS was stable during this period. This could imply that some patients may have failed to seek medical advice despite experiencing a myocardial infarction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chest Pain/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
15.
Nucl Med Commun ; 43(7): 756-762, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831521

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the effects of COVID-19 pneumonia on cardiac ischemia detected by myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) in patients presenting with chest pain and shortness of breath after recovery from COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Patients with a history of COVID-19 confirmed by reverse transcriptase-PCR test who underwent SPECT-MPI for the evaluation of ischemia with the complaints of chest pain and shortness of breath were screened for this study. Patients who underwent thorax CT during the acute period of the COVID-19 were included. Patients with and without pneumonia were determined based on computed tomographic criteria. The patients with a summed stress score of at least 4 on SPECT-MPI were considered to have abnormal MPI in terms of ischemia. RESULTS: A total of 266 patients were included in the study. Sixty-five (24%) patients had ischemia findings on SPECT-MPI. Thorax CT showed pneumonia in 152 (57%) patients, and the patients were divided into two groups as pneumonia and nonpneumonia. Abnormal SPECT-MPI scores, which represented myocardial ischemia, were higher in the pneumonia group. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that the presence of hyperlipidemia and pneumonia on CT increased the risk of ischemia on SPECT-MPI (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.08-3.99; P-value = 0.029; and OR, 2.90; 95% Cl, 1.52-5.54; P-value = 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pneumonia was identified as an independent predictor of ischemia on SPECT-MPI. Symptoms including chest pain and shortness of breath in patients who have had COVID-19 pneumonia may be attributed to coronary ischemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Artery Disease , Myocardial Ischemia , Myocardial Perfusion Imaging , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Chest Pain , Dyspnea , Humans , Myocardial Ischemia/complications , Myocardial Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Myocardial Perfusion Imaging/methods , Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods
16.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e057863, 2022 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832458

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate if the physical activity (PA) prior to infection is associated with the severity of the disease in patients positively tested for COVID-19, as well as with the most common symptoms. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study using baseline data from a prospective, hybrid cohort study (Predi-COVID) in Luxembourg. Data were collected from May 2020 to June 2021. SETTING: Real-life setting (at home) and hospitalised patients. PARTICIPANTS: All volunteers aged >18 years with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR, and having completed the PA questionnaire (n=452). PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was disease severity (asymptomatic, mild illness and moderate illness). The secondary outcomes were self-reported symptoms. RESULTS: From the 452 patients included, 216 (48%) were female, the median (IQR) age was 42 (31-51) years, 59 (13%) were classified as asymptomatic, 287 (63%) as mild illness and 106 (24%) as moderate illness. The most prevalent symptoms were fatigue (n=294; 65%), headache (n=281; 62%) and dry cough (n=241; 53%). After adjustment, the highest PA level was associated with a lower risk of moderate illness (OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.98, p=0.045), fatigue (OR 0.54; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.97, p=0.040), dry cough (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.32 to 0.96, p=0.034) and chest pain (OR 0.32; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.77, p=0.010). CONCLUSIONS: PA before COVID-19 infection was associated with a reduced risk of moderate illness severity and a reduced risk of experiencing fatigue, dry cough and chest pain, suggesting that engaging in PA may be an effective approach to minimise the severity of COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04380987.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chest Pain/virology , Cohort Studies , Cough/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/virology , Female , Humans , Luxembourg/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
17.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 10: 23247096221092291, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808263

ABSTRACT

Viral infections are a common cause of acute myocarditis. However, vaccines including influenza and smallpox have also been rarely implicated. Recently, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines have been associated with acute myocarditis. We describe a case of acute myocarditis in a 19-year-old male 2 days after the initial dose of the COVID-19 mRNA-1273 vaccine. He presented with chest pain radiating to his left arm and bilateral shoulders. COVID, influenza, coxsackie, respiratory syncytial virus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests were negative. Electrocardiogram revealed diffuse ST-segment elevation. Initial Troponin was 15.7 ng/mL. A coronary angiogram revealed patent coronary arteries and no wall motion abnormality. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed diffuse hypokinesis with an ejection fraction of 49%. Cardiac magnetic resonance scan was aborted after 2 attempts due to severe claustrophobia. His chest pain resolved following initiation of aspirin, tylenol, colchicine, lisinopril, and metoprolol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Myocarditis , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Chest Pain/etiology , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Male , Myocarditis/complications , Vaccination/adverse effects , Young Adult
18.
Dis Markers ; 2022: 9713326, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770053

ABSTRACT

The use of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays has become part of the daily practice in most of the laboratories worldwide in the initial evaluation of the typical chest pain. Due to their early surge, the use of hs-cTn may reduce the time needed to recognise myocardial infarctions (MI), which is vital for the patients presenting in the emergency departments for chest pain. The latest European Society of Cardiology Guidelines did not only recognise their central role in the diagnosis algorithm but also recommended their use for rapid rule-in/rule-out of MI. High-sensitivity cardiac troponins are also powerful prognostic markers for long-term events and mortality, not only in a wide spectrum of other cardiovascular diseases (CVD) but also in several non-CVD pathologies. Moreover, these biomarkers became a powerful tool in special populations, such as paediatric patients and, most recently, COVID-19 patients. Although highly investigated, the assessment and interpretation of the hs-cTn changes are still challenging in the patients with basal elevation such as CKD or critically ill patients. Moreover, there are still various analytical characteristics not completely understood, such as circadian or sex variability, with major clinical implications. In this context, the present review focuses on summarizing the most recent research in the current use of hs-cTn, with a main consideration for its role in the diagnosis of MI but also its prognostic value. We have also carefully selected the most important studies regarding the challenges faced by clinicians from different specialties in the correct interpretation of this biomarker. Moreover, future perspectives have been proposed and analysed, as more research and cross-disciplinary collaboration are necessary to improve their performance.


Subject(s)
Myocardial Infarction , Troponin , Biomarkers , Chest Pain , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Troponin/blood
20.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 31(5): 620-630, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758608

ABSTRACT

Background: Sex differences have been demonstrated in the acute phase of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Women (F) were found to be less prone to develop a severe disease than men (M), but few studies have assessed sex-differences in Long-COVID-19 syndrome. Methods: The aim of this prospective/retrospective study was to characterize the long-term consequences of this infection based on sex. For this purpose, we enrolled 223 patients (89 F and 134 M) who were infected by SARS-CoV-2. In the acute phase of the illness, F reported the following symptoms more frequently than M: weakness, dysgeusia, anosmia, thoracic pain, palpitations, diarrhea, and myalgia-all without significant differences in breathlessness, cough, and sleep disturbance. Results: After a mean follow-up time of 5 months after the acute phase, F were significantly more likely than M to report dyspnea, weakness, thoracic pain, palpitations, and sleep disturbance but not myalgia and cough. At the multivariate logistic regression, women were statistically significantly likely to experience persistent symptoms such as dyspnea, fatigue, chest pain, and palpitations. On the contrary, myalgia, cough, and sleep disturbance were not influenced by sex. Conclusion: We demonstrated that F were more symptomatic than M not only in the acute phase but also at follow-up. Sex was found to be an important determinant of Long-COVID-19 syndrome because it is a significant predictor of persistent symptoms in F, such as dyspnea, fatigue, chest pain, and palpitations. Our results suggest the need for long-term follow-up of these patients from a sex perspective to implement early preventive and personalized therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chest Pain/etiology , Cough/complications , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue , Female , Humans , Male , Myalgia/complications , Myalgia/etiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Characteristics , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Syndrome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL