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2.
Am Heart J ; 241: 83-86, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384824

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection has been associated with cardiovascular disease in children, but which children need cardiac evaluation is unclear. We describe our experience evaluating 206 children for cardiac disease following SARS-CoV-2 infection (one of whom had ventricular ectopy) and propose a new guideline for management of these children. Routine cardiac screening after SARS-CoV-2 infection in children without any cardiac signs or symptoms does not appear to be high yield.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , COVID-19/physiopathology , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Referral and Consultation , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care , Atrioventricular Block/diagnosis , Atrioventricular Block/etiology , Atrioventricular Block/physiopathology , Bradycardia/diagnosis , Bradycardia/etiology , Bradycardia/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , Cardiology , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Echocardiography , Electrocardiography , Fatigue/physiopathology , Female , Heart Diseases/etiology , Heart Diseases/physiopathology , Humans , Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular/diagnosis , Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular/etiology , Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular/physiopathology , Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular/diagnosis , Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular/etiology , Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular/physiopathology , Implementation Science , Male , Pediatrics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Syncope/physiopathology , Ventricular Premature Complexes/diagnosis , Ventricular Premature Complexes/etiology , Ventricular Premature Complexes/physiopathology , Young Adult
3.
Chron Respir Dis ; 18: 14799731211002240, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138509

ABSTRACT

Knowledge on the sequelae of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains limited due to the relatively recent onset of this pathology. However, the literature on other types of coronavirus infections prior to COVID-19 reports that patients may experience persistent symptoms after discharge. To determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms in survivors of hospital admission after COVID-19 infection. A living systematic review of five databases was performed in order to identify studies which reported the persistence of respiratory symptoms in COVID-19 patients after discharge. Two independent researchers reviewed and analysed the available literature, and then extracted and assessed the quality of those articles. Of the 1,154 reports returned by the initial search nine articles were found, in which 1,816 patients were included in the data synthesis. In the pooled analysis, we found a prevalence of 0.52 (CI 0.38-0.66, p < 0.01, I 2 = 97%), 0.37 (CI 0.28-0.48, p < 0.01, I 2 = 93%), 0.16 (CI 0.10-0.23, p < 0.01, I 2 = 90%) and 0.14 (CI 0.06-0.24, p < 0.01, I 2 = 96%) for fatigue, dyspnoea, chest pain, and cough, respectively. Fatigue, dyspnoea, chest pain, and cough were the most prevalent respiratory symptoms found in 52%, 37%, 16% and 14% of patients between 3 weeks and 3 months, after discharge in survivors of hospital admission by COVID-19, respectively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Chest Pain/epidemiology , Cough/epidemiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Humans , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(3): e211085, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125122

ABSTRACT

Importance: Solid estimates of the risk of developing symptoms and of progressing to critical disease in individuals infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are key to interpreting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) dynamics, identifying the settings and the segments of the population where transmission is more likely to remain undetected, and defining effective control strategies. Objective: To estimate the association of age with the likelihood of developing symptoms and the association of age with the likelihood of progressing to critical illness after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study analyzed quarantined case contacts, identified between February 20 and April 16, 2020, in the Lombardy region of Italy. Contacts were monitored daily for symptoms and tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection, by either real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using nasopharyngeal swabs or retrospectively via IgG serological assays. Close contacts of individuals with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were selected as those belonging to clusters (ie, groups of contacts associated with an index case) where all individuals were followed up for symptoms and tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Data were analyzed from February to June 2020. Exposure: Close contact with individuals with confirmed COVID-19 cases as identified by contact tracing operations. Main Outcomes and Measures: Age-specific estimates of the risk of developing respiratory symptoms or fever greater than or equal to 37.5 °C and of experiencing critical disease (defined as requiring intensive care or resulting in death) in SARS-CoV-2-infected case contacts. Results: In total, 5484 case contacts (median [interquartile range] age, 50 [30-61] years; 3086 female contacts [56.3%]) were analyzed, 2824 of whom (51.5%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (median [interquartile range] age, 53 [34-64] years; 1604 female contacts [56.8%]). The proportion of infected persons who developed symptoms ranged from 18.1% (95% CI, 13.9%-22.9%) among participants younger than 20 years to 64.6% (95% CI, 56.6%-72.0%) for those aged 80 years or older. Most infected contacts (1948 of 2824 individuals [69.0%]) did not develop respiratory symptoms or fever greater than or equal to 37.5 °C. Only 26.1% (95% CI, 24.1%-28.2%) of infected individuals younger than 60 years developed respiratory symptoms or fever greater than or equal to 37.5 °C; among infected participants older than 60 years, 6.6% (95% CI, 5.1%-8.3%) developed critical disease. Female patients were 52.7% (95% CI, 24.4%-70.7%) less likely than male patients to develop critical disease after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Conclusions and Relevance: In this Italian cohort study of close contacts of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, more than one-half of individuals tested positive for the virus. However, most infected individuals did not develop respiratory symptoms or fever. The low proportion of children and young adults who developed symptoms highlights the possible challenges in readily identifying SARS-CoV-2 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Carrier State/epidemiology , Cough/epidemiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Fever/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Chest Pain/epidemiology , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Contact Tracing , Cough/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Disease Progression , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pharyngitis/epidemiology , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Quarantine , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tachypnea/epidemiology , Tachypnea/physiopathology , Young Adult
5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(1)2021 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066837

ABSTRACT

A previously healthy 37-year-old man presented with fevers and myalgias for a week with a minimal dry cough. Initial SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal testing was negative, but in light of high community prevalence, he was diagnosed with COVID-19, treated with supportive care and self-quarantined at home. Three days after resolution of all symptoms, he developed sudden onset chest pain. Chest imaging revealed a large right-sided pneumothorax and patchy subpleural ground glass opacities. IgM and IgG antibodies for SARS-CoV-2 were positive. His pneumothorax resolved after placement of a small-bore chest tube, which was removed after 2 days.This case demonstrates that patients with COVID-19 can develop a significant pulmonary complication, a large pneumothorax, despite only minimal lower respiratory tract symptoms and after resolution of the original illness. Medical professionals should consider development of a pneumothorax in patients who have recovered from COVID-19 and present with new respiratory symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Convalescence , Pneumothorax/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Chest Tubes , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Myalgia/physiopathology , Pneumothorax/diagnostic imaging , Pneumothorax/physiopathology , Pneumothorax/therapy , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thoracostomy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
6.
Neurogastroenterol Motil ; 33(5): e14092, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Psychological stress and anxiety, such those generated by forced quarantine, affect gastrointestinal symptoms course in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders. Thus, our aim was to assess, in a cohort of patients regularly followed up in a devoted outpatient clinic of Southern Italy, the association between their gastrointestinal symptoms changes, stress, and anxiety reported during the Italian lockdown. METHODS: We recruited patients from the outpatient clinic of the University of Salerno, devoted to functional gastrointestinal disorders, selecting only patients for whom an evaluation was available in the last 6 months before the lockdown. Gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated at each visit through standardized questionnaire and pooled in a database. On 45th days from the beginning of the lockdown, patients were re-assessed by phone with the same questionnaire. Anxiety and stress levels were assessed through a self-administered online questionnaire based on Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 test and Perceived Stress Scale 10 test. KEY RESULTS: The intensity-frequency scores of several upper gastrointestinal symptoms improved (Wilcoxon test <0.05). Higher anxiety levels had a higher risk of worsening chest pain (OR 1.3 [1.1-1.7]), waterbrash (OR 1.3 [1.0-1.7]), epigastric burning (OR 1.3 [1.0-1.6]), and abdominal pain (OR 1.6 [1.0-2.3]). When compared to the interval preceding the outbreak, half of the patients declared their symptoms remained unchanged, 13.6% worsened, and 36.4% improved. CONCLUSIONS AND INFERENCES: During the COVID-19 quarantine, there was an improvement of the majority of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in our patients, and anxiety seems an important risk of worsening few of them.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Dyspepsia/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/physiopathology , Heartburn/physiopathology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/psychology , Adult , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Chest Pain/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Dyspepsia/psychology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/psychology , Heartburn/psychology , Humans , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/psychology , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Health Questionnaire , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Semin Perinatol ; 44(7): 151285, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029103

ABSTRACT

Close observation and rapid escalation of care is essential for obstetric patients with COVID-19. The pandemic forced widespread conversion of in-person to virtual care delivery and telehealth was primed to enable outpatient surveillance of infected patients. We describe the experience and lessons learned while designing and implementing a virtual telemonitoring COVID-19 clinic for obstetric patients. All patients with suspected for confirmed COVID-19 were referred and enrolled. Telehealth visits were conducted every 24 to 72 hours based on the severity of symptoms and care was escalated to in person when necessary. The outcome of the majority (96.1%) of telehealth visits was to continue outpatient management. With regard to escalation of care, 25 patients (26.6%) presented for in person evaluation and five patients (5.3%) required inpatient admission. A virtual telemonitoring clinic for obstetric patients with mild COVID-19 offers an effective surveillance strategy as it allows for close monitoring, direct connection to in person evaluation, minimization of patient and provider exposure, and scalability.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory , Body Temperature , COVID-19/therapy , Fetal Movement , Oximetry , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/physiopathology , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Disease Management , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Triage
8.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(1)2021 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1020898

ABSTRACT

A 34-year-old woman was seen in the emergency department for shortness of breath and chest pain. During a pandemic, it is easy to 'think horses and not zebras', and with a patient presenting with the classic coronavirus symptoms it would have been easy to jump to that as her diagnosis. After a careful history and examination, it became clear that there was another underlying diagnosis. Chest X-ray, echocardiogram and CT scan revealed marked right ventricular dilatation and pulmonary hypertension, alongside a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC). Further investigation with cardiac MRI and coronary angiography at a tertiary centre demonstrated that she not only have a PLSVC but also a partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage and sinus venosus atrial septal defect. This case highlights the importance of considering all differentials and approaching investigations in a logical manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Heart Septal Defects, Atrial/diagnostic imaging , Hypertension, Pulmonary/diagnostic imaging , Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular/diagnostic imaging , Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava/diagnostic imaging , Scimitar Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Adult , Cardiac Catheterization , Chest Pain/etiology , Computed Tomography Angiography , Coronary Angiography , Diagnosis, Differential , Dilatation, Pathologic/complications , Dilatation, Pathologic/diagnostic imaging , Dilatation, Pathologic/physiopathology , Dyspnea/etiology , Echocardiography , Electrocardiography , Female , Heart Septal Defects, Atrial/complications , Heart Septal Defects, Atrial/physiopathology , Humans , Hypertension, Pulmonary/complications , Hypertension, Pulmonary/physiopathology , Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular/complications , Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular/physiopathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava/complications , Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Scimitar Syndrome/complications , Scimitar Syndrome/physiopathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Ventricular Pressure
10.
Chest ; 159(2): 657-662, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-928873
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