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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e057863, 2022 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832458

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate if the physical activity (PA) prior to infection is associated with the severity of the disease in patients positively tested for COVID-19, as well as with the most common symptoms. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study using baseline data from a prospective, hybrid cohort study (Predi-COVID) in Luxembourg. Data were collected from May 2020 to June 2021. SETTING: Real-life setting (at home) and hospitalised patients. PARTICIPANTS: All volunteers aged >18 years with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR, and having completed the PA questionnaire (n=452). PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was disease severity (asymptomatic, mild illness and moderate illness). The secondary outcomes were self-reported symptoms. RESULTS: From the 452 patients included, 216 (48%) were female, the median (IQR) age was 42 (31-51) years, 59 (13%) were classified as asymptomatic, 287 (63%) as mild illness and 106 (24%) as moderate illness. The most prevalent symptoms were fatigue (n=294; 65%), headache (n=281; 62%) and dry cough (n=241; 53%). After adjustment, the highest PA level was associated with a lower risk of moderate illness (OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.98, p=0.045), fatigue (OR 0.54; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.97, p=0.040), dry cough (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.32 to 0.96, p=0.034) and chest pain (OR 0.32; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.77, p=0.010). CONCLUSIONS: PA before COVID-19 infection was associated with a reduced risk of moderate illness severity and a reduced risk of experiencing fatigue, dry cough and chest pain, suggesting that engaging in PA may be an effective approach to minimise the severity of COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04380987.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chest Pain/virology , Cohort Studies , Cough/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/virology , Female , Humans , Luxembourg/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 117-120, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436205

ABSTRACT

This is a case report of a 55-year-old man with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus who presented with progressive breathlessness, chest pain and hyperglycaemia. An initial impression of a chest infection was made. Management was initiated with antibiotics, but this was unsuccessful, and he continued to desaturate. A screen for Coronavirus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) returned positive. There was no prodrome of fever or flu-like illness or known contact with a patient known to have COVID-19. This case is instructive as he didn't fit the typical case definition for suspected COVID-19. There is significant community spread in Ghana, therefore COVID-19 should be a differential diagnosis in patients who present with hyperglycaemia and respiratory symptoms in the absence of a febrile illness. Primary care doctors must have a high index of suspicion in cases of significant hyperglycaemia and inability to maintain oxygen saturation. Patients known to have diabetes and those not known to have diabetes may develop hyperglycaemia subsequent to COVID-19. A high index of suspicion is crucial for early identification, notification for testing, isolation, treatment, contact tracing and possible referral or coordination of care with other specialists. Early identification will protect healthcare workers and patients alike from cross-infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/virology , Chest Pain/diagnosis , Chest Pain/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/virology , Ghana , Humans , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care , Urban Health Services
3.
Lung ; 199(3): 249-253, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227841

ABSTRACT

This multicenter study presents prevalence data and associated risk factors of post-COVID-19 cough one year after hospital discharge in COVID-19 survivors. Individuals recovered from COVID-19 at three public hospitals in Madrid (Spain) were scheduled for a telephonic interview. They were systematically asked about the presence of respiratory symptoms, e.g., fatigue, dyspnea, chest pain, and cough after hospital discharge. Clinical and hospitalization data were collected from hospital records. Overall, 1,950 patients (47% women, mean age:61, SD:16 years) were assessed at 11.2 months (SD 0.5) after hospital discharge. Just 367 (18.8%) were completely free of any respiratory post-COVID -19 symptom. The prevalence of long-term cough, chest pain, dyspnea, and fatigue was 2.5%, 6.5%, 23.3%, and 61.2%, respectively. Clinical and hospitalization factors were not associated with long-term post-COVID-19 cough. In conclusion, the prevalence of post-COVID-19 cough one year after SARS-CoV-2 infection was 2.5% in subjects who had survived hospitalization for COVID-19. No clear risk factor associated to long-term post-COVID-19 cough was identified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/virology , Aged , Chest Pain/epidemiology , Chest Pain/virology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/virology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Time Factors
4.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 304, 2021 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153989

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease once thought to be a respiratory infection is now recognised as a multi-system disease affecting the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, neurological, immune, and hematopoietic systems. An emerging body of evidence suggests the persistence of COVID-19 symptoms of varying patterns among some survivors. This study aimed to describe persistent symptoms in COVID-19 survivors and investigate possible risk factors for these persistent symptoms. METHODS: The study used a retrospective study design. The study population comprised of discharged COVID-19 patients. Demographic information, days since discharge, comorbidities, and persistent COVID-19 like symptoms were assessed in patients attending the COVID-19 outpatient clinic in Lagos State. Statistical analysis was done using STATA 15.0 software (StataCorp Texas) with significance placed at p-value < 0.05. RESULTS: A total of 274 patients were enrolled in the study. A majority were within the age group > 35 to ≤49 years (38.3%), and male (66.1%). More than one-third (40.9%) had persistent COVID-19 symptoms after discharge, and 19.7% had more than three persistent COVID-like symptoms. The most persistent COVID-like symptoms experienced were easy fatigability (12.8%), headaches (12.8%), and chest pain (9.8%). Symptomatic COVID-19 disease with moderate severity compared to mild severity was a predictor of persistent COVID-like symptoms after discharge (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Findings from this study suggests that patients who recovered from COVID-19 disease may still experience COVID-19 like symptoms, particularly fatigue and headaches. Therefore, careful monitoring should be in place after discharge to help mitigate the effects of these symptoms and improve the quality of life of COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Survivors , Adult , Chest Pain/virology , Comorbidity , Fatigue/virology , Female , Headache/virology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nigeria/epidemiology , Patient Discharge , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies
5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(2)2021 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099755

ABSTRACT

We report a case of cardiac injury in a 46-year-old man affected by COVID-19. The patient presented with shortness of breath and fever. ECG revealed sinus tachycardia with ventricular extrasystoles and T-wave inversion in anterior leads. Troponin T and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide were elevated. Transthoracic echocardiography showed severely reduced systolic function with an estimated left ventricle ejection fraction of 30%. A nasopharingeal swab was positive for SARS-CoV-2. On day 6, 11 days after onset of symptoms, the patient deteriorated clinically with new chest pain and type 1 respiratory failure. Treatment with colchicine 0.5 mg 8-hourly resulted in rapid clinical resolution. This case report highlights how cardiac injury can dominate the clinical picture in COVID-19 infection. The role of colchicine therapy should be further studied to determine its usefulness in reducing myocardial and possibly lung parenchymal inflammatory responses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Colchicine/therapeutic use , Heart Diseases/drug therapy , Heart Diseases/virology , Chest Pain/virology , Echocardiography , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardium/pathology , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Peptide Fragments/blood , Systole , Troponin T/blood
7.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(12)2020 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975666

ABSTRACT

Much has been reported on the clinical course of severe COVID-19, but less is known about the natural history and sequalae of mildly symptomatic cases and the prospects of reinfection or recurrence of symptoms. We report a case of a patient with mildly symptomatic PCR-confirmed COVID-19 who, after being symptom-free for 2 weeks, redeveloped symptoms and was found to be PCR-positive again >4 weeks from original testing. Surprisingly, IgG and IgM antibody testing was negative 2 months after reinfection. Although no negative testing was performed between the two symptomatic bouts, this case raises the possibility of reinfection after controlling the virus and highlights the long period with which a patient can shed virus and experience symptoms after initial infection. Characterising variations in clinical symptoms and length of viral shedding after improvement is essential for informing recommendations on patients safely resuming contact with others.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Reinfection/virology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Chest Pain/virology , Dyspnea/virology , Fatigue/virology , Humans , Male , Patient Acuity , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment , Time Factors
8.
Am Surg ; 86(6): 572-576, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-656493

ABSTRACT

A surgeon failed to heed his own misgivings on taking a family vacation cruise. Despite scrupulous hand-washing and antiseptic precautions with anything within reach, he contracts COVID-19. His anxiety increased as his condition became increasingly serious: uncontrollable dry coughing spells, spiking fevers, and his worst symptom, progressive dyspnea and chest pain. From what he knew about the disease, he feared admission to the intensive care unit, a step that portended a significantly worse prognosis. After a week-and-a-half of illness, misery, and fear, he began to improve: first, his fevers diminished, breathing came more easily, and coughing spells occurred less frequently, if still unpredictably. Now with his strength slowly returning, he contemplated returning to work but was frustrated when tests showed he was still shedding active virions. Under quarantine and with time to reflect, he cautions against complacency with regard to the infectiousness of COVID-19. His own denial led to the loss of his health and livelihood. At home but still separated from his wife and children in a basement bedroom, the bittersweet circumstances of his reunion with them is a reminder of the preciousness of life and love of family.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Denial, Psychological , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Surgeons/psychology , Anxiety , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chest Pain/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cough/virology , Dyspnea/virology , Family , Fear , Fever/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Am J Emerg Med ; 38(11): 2489.e1-2489.e2, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459557

ABSTRACT

We present the case of a 20-year-old male patient without previous history of cardiovascular disease who was admitted to our hospital with a new onset febrile sensation and chest pain. Chest computed tomography revealed a subpleural consolidation with a halo of ground-glass opacification. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of markers of myocyte necrosis (troponin I and creatine kinase-MB). Nasopharyngeal swab was positive for COVID-19. Cardiac MRI showed myocardial edema and late gadolinium enhancement compatible with myocarditis associated with COVID-19 infection. This case showed that acute myocarditis can be the initial presentation of patients with COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Myocarditis/virology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Chest Pain/virology , Fever/virology , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Myocarditis/diagnostic imaging , Young Adult
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