Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 47
Filter
1.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 21: e0089, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1703035

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the factors associated with the SARS-CoV-2 infection among oral health professionals. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in the city of São Paulo, São Paulo State, Brazil. Professionals from three different categories were included: dental surgeons (DS), dental assistants (DA), and dental hygienists (DH). A questionnaire was created on a digital platform and sent via institutional email to each subject. The questionnaire contained 32 questions about sociodemographic, work, and behavior factors. The data about SARS-CoV-2 infection was confirmed through RT-PCR exams. Descriptive (absolute and relative frequencies) and inferential analyses (chi-squared or Fisher's exact test) (p<0.05) were performed. Results: There was a SARS-CoV-2 infection prevalence of 3.8% for DS, 30.0% for DH, and 33.3% for DA. SARS-CoV-2 was associated with a lower income (p=0.027), a lower education level (p=0.011), the category of technical professionals (DA and DH) (p=0.025), and using public transportation to commute to work (p=0.009). Conclusion: Sociodemographic factors like lower income and education levels and work factors like job category and public transportation were associated with COVID-19 among professionals on the oral health teams.


Subject(s)
Primary Health Care , Oral Health , Health Personnel , Dental Assistants , COVID-19 , Brazil/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cross-Sectional Studies/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Dental Health Services
2.
Eur J Med Res ; 27(1): 3, 2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622261

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as an infectious disease primarily spreading through droplet infection in dental treatment. Patient satisfaction is an indicator of healthcare quality service. Quality of healthcare service and patient satisfaction has been affected by the COVID­19 pandemic. This study aims to assess the knowledge and satisfaction toward health protocols COVID-19 during dental treatment among dental patients. METHODS: An institutional-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 270 dental patients using a self­designed questionnaire consisting of knowledge and satisfaction about health protocols COVID-19 during dental treatment through a random sampling technique. Data were imported to SPSS version 21 for analysis. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used to identify the factors associated with their knowledge and satisfaction. A p value < 0.05 was considered statistical significance. RESULTS: Totally, 270 dental patients with mean age of 37.6 ± 6.7 years participated in the study. The mean knowledge score was 36.7 ± 3.5, as considerable number of participants were unaware about the risk associated with dental treatment as well as restrictions imposed on dental procedures. About 18% of participants experienced one or other form of dental complaints during the lockdown period. The overall level of patient satisfaction was 44.6%. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that, public knowledge is to be improved about risk of virus transmission that can be related with dental treatment and also people should be encouraged to use virtual facilities, such as teledentistry, so that no dental emergencies is left untreated during the pandemic time. In addition, the level of satisfaction was in a medium level for dental patients in the study area. Specifically, we deduced from the results that social/physical distancing measures are one of the mechanisms to decrease the fear of exposure to the COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Dental Care/statistics & numerical data , Knowledge , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dental Care/methods , Dental Care/standards , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Young Adult
3.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260298, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some studies revealed that despite having sufficient sun exposure and dietary supply, the level of serum 25(OH)D in Bangladeshi adults is lower than its normal range. Genetic pattern of an individual is also an essential factor that regulates the level of serum 25(OH)D. However, the genetic variations of CYP2R1 (rs10741657) and their association with low serum 25(OH)D level in Bangladeshi adults are yet to be explored. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to determine the frequency of variants of rs10741657 of CYP2R1 gene and its association with low serum 25(OH)D level among Bangladeshi adults. METHOD: This pilot study was conducted among thirty individuals with low serum 25(OH)D level as the study population and ten subjects with sufficient serum 25(OH)D level as controls based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Genetic analysis of rs10741657 of CYP2R1 including primer designing, DNA extraction, PCR of target region with purification and Sanger sequencing of the PCR products were done accordingly. For statistical analysis, One-way ANOVA followed by LSD test, Freeman-Halton extension of Fisher's exact test, Chi-square test (χ2) test and unpaired student t-test were performed. RESULTS: In this study, genetic variants of CYP2R1 (rs10741657) among the study population were genotype GG (63.30%), GA (30%) and AA (6.7%). Minor allele frequency of the study population was 0.217. The association between GG and GA genotypes of CYP2R1 (rs10741657) with low serum 25(OH)D level among the study population was found and it was statistically significant. Statistically significant differences were also observed between the genotypes and alleles of the study population and controls. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of 'GG' and 'GA' genotypes of rs1041657 in CYP2R1 gene is associated with low serum 25(OH)D level among Bangladeshi adults in this pilot study.


Subject(s)
/genetics , Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase/genetics , Cytochrome P450 Family 2/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Adult , Alleles , Chi-Square Distribution , Female , Gene Frequency/genetics , Genetic Testing/methods , Genotype , Humans , Male , Pilot Projects , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Vitamin D/blood
4.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 21: e0089, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1511869

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the factors associated with the SARS-CoV-2 infection among oral health professionals. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in the city of São Paulo, São Paulo State, Brazil. Professionals from three different categories were included: dental surgeons (DS), dental assistants (DA), and dental hygienists (DH). A questionnaire was created on a digital platform and sent via institutional email to each subject. The questionnaire contained 32 questions about sociodemographic, work, and behavior factors. The data about SARS-CoV-2 infection was confirmed through RT-PCR exams. Descriptive (absolute and relative frequencies) and inferential analyses (chi-squared or Fisher's exact test) (p<0.05) were performed. Results: There was a SARS-CoV-2 infection prevalence of 3.8% for DS, 30.0% for DH, and 33.3% for DA. SARS-CoV-2 was associated with a lower income (p=0.027), a lower education level (p=0.011), the category of technical professionals (DA and DH) (p=0.025), and using public transportation to commute to work (p=0.009). Conclusion: Sociodemographic factors like lower income and education levels and work factors like job category and public transportation were associated with COVID-19 among professionals on the oral health teams.


Subject(s)
Primary Health Care , Oral Health , Health Personnel , Dental Assistants , COVID-19 , Brazil/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cross-Sectional Studies/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Dental Health Services
5.
Am J Emerg Med ; 51: 64-68, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458554

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A decline in OHCA performance metrics during the pandemic has been reported in the literature but the cause is still not known. The Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service (MCFRS) observed a decline in both the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and the proportion of resuscitations that resulted in cerebral performance category (CPC) 1 or 2 discharge of the patient beginning in March of 2020. This study examines whether the decline in these performance metrics persists when known COVID positive patients are excluded from the analysis. METHODS: Two samples of OHCA patients for similar time periods (one year apart) before and after the start of the COVID pandemic were developed. A database of known COVID positive patients among EMS encounters was used to identify and exclude COVID positive patients. OHCA outcomes in these two groups were then compared using a Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test for difference in proportions and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for difference in means. A two-stage multivariable logistic regression model was used to develop odds ratios for achieving ROSC and CPC 1 or 2 discharge in each period. RESULTS: After excluding known COVID patients, 32.5% of the patients in the pre-COVID period achieved ROSC compared to 25.1% in the COVID period (p = 0.007). 6% of patients in the pre-COVID period were discharged with CPC 1 or 2 compared to 3.2% from the COVID era (p = 0.026). Controlling for all available patient characteristics, patients undergoing OHCA resuscitation prior to be beginning of the pandemic were 1.2 times more likely to achieve ROSC and 1.6 times more likely to be discharged with CPC 1 or 2 than non-COVID patients in the pandemic era sample. CONCLUSIONS: When known COVID patients are excluded, pre-pandemic OHCA resuscitation patients were more likely to achieve ROSC and CPC 1 or 2 discharge. The prevalence of known COVID positive patients among all OHCA resuscitations during the pandemic was not sufficient to fully account for the marked decrease in both ROSC and CPC 1 or 2 discharges. Other causative factors must be sought.


Subject(s)
Benchmarking , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/epidemiology , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Analysis of Variance , COVID-19 , Chi-Square Distribution , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Maryland , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Resuscitation , Retrospective Studies , Return of Spontaneous Circulation
6.
Adv Rheumatol ; 61(1): 60, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of information on the role of chronic use of hydroxychloroquine during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Our aim was to compare the occurrence of COVID-19 between rheumatic disease patients on hydroxychloroquine with individuals from the same household not taking the drug during the first 8 weeks of community viral transmission in Brazil. METHODS: This baseline cross-sectional analysis is part of a 24-week observational multi-center study involving 22 Brazilian academic outpatient centers. All information regarding COVID-19 symptoms, epidemiological, clinical, and demographic data were recorded on a specific web-based platform using telephone calls from physicians and medical students. COVID-19 was defined according to the Brazilian Ministry of Health (BMH) criteria. Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Exact Fisher tests were used for statistical analysis and two binary Final Logistic Regression Model by Wald test were developed using a backward-stepwise method for the presence of COVID-19. RESULTS: From March 29th to May 17st, 2020, a total of 10,443 participants were enrolled, including 5166 (53.9%) rheumatic disease patients, of whom 82.5% had systemic erythematosus lupus, 7.8% rheumatoid arthritis, 3.7% Sjögren's syndrome and 0.8% systemic sclerosis. In total, 1822 (19.1%) participants reported flu symptoms within the 30 days prior to enrollment, of which 3.1% fulfilled the BMH criteria, but with no significant difference between rheumatic disease patients (4.03%) and controls (3.25%). After adjustments for multiple confounders, the main risk factor significantly associated with a COVID-19 diagnosis was lung disease (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.03-2.58); and for rheumatic disease patients were diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.19-6.63) and glucocorticoids above 10 mg/ day (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.31-3.19). In addition, a recent influenza vaccination had a protective effect (OR 0.674; 95% CI 0.46-0.98). CONCLUSION: Patients with rheumatic disease on hydroxychloroquine presented a similar occurrence of COVID-19 to household cohabitants, suggesting a lack of any protective role against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (ReBEC; RBR - 9KTWX6).


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Health/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Scleroderma, Systemic/drug therapy , Sjogren's Syndrome/drug therapy , Statistics, Nonparametric , Young Adult
7.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e212, 2021 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447272

ABSTRACT

Hebei Province was affected by two coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak waves during the period 22 January 2020 through 27 February 2020 (wave 1) and 2 January 2021 through 14 February 2021 (wave 2). To evaluate and compare the epidemiological characteristics, containment delay, cluster events and social activity, as well as non-pharmaceutical interventions of the two COVID-19 outbreak waves, we examined real-time update information on all COVID-19-confirmed cases from a publicly available database. Wave 1 was closely linked with the COVID-19 pandemic in Wuhan, whereas wave 2 was triggered, to a certain extent, by the increasing social activities such as weddings, multi-household gatherings and church events during the slack agricultural period. In wave 2, the epidemic spread undetected in the rural areas, and people living in the rural areas had a higher incidence rate than those living in the urban areas (5.3 vs. 22.0 per 1 000 000). Furthermore, Rt was greater than 1 in the early stage of the two outbreak waves, and decreased substantially after massive non-pharmaceutical interventions were implemented. In China's 'new-normal' situation, development of targeted and effective intervention remains key for COVID-19 control in consideration of the potential threat of new coronavirus strains.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Behavior , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/virology , Chi-Square Distribution , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Demography , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Travel , Urban Population , Young Adult
8.
Am J Emerg Med ; 53: 285.e1-285.e5, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432719

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 brought unique challenges; however, it remains unclear what effect the pandemic had on violence in healthcare. The objective of this study was to identify the impact of the pandemic on workplace violence at an academic emergency department (ED). METHODS: This mixed-methods study involved a prospective descriptive survey study and electronic medical record review. Within our hospital referral region (HRR), the first COVID-19 case was documented on 3/11/2020 and cases peaked in mid-November 2020. We compared the monthly HRR COVID-19 case rate per 100,000 people to the rate of violent incidents per 1000 ED visits. Multidisciplinary ED staff were surveyed both pre/early-pandemic (April 2020) and mid/late-pandemic (December 2020) regarding workplace violence experienced over the prior 6-months. The study was deemed exempt by the Mayo Clinic Institutional Review Board. RESULTS: There was a positive association between the monthly HRR COVID-19 case rate and rate of violent ED incidents (r = 0.24). Violent incidents increased overall during the pandemic (2.53 incidents per 1000 visits) compared to the 3 months prior (1.13 incidents per 1000 visits, p < .001), as well as compared to the previous year (1.24 incidents per 1000 patient visits, p < .001). Survey respondents indicated a higher incidence of assault during the pandemic, compared to before (p = .019). DISCUSSION: Incidents of workplace violence at our ED increased during the pandemic and there was a positive association of these incidents with the COVID-19 case rate. Our findings indicate health systems should prioritize employee safety during future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Chi-Square Distribution , Crime Victims/rehabilitation , Data Mining/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace Violence/trends
9.
Rev Esp Quimioter ; 33(6): 444-447, 2020 Dec.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390020

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Co-circulation of the two Influenza B lineages hinders forecast of strain to include in trivalent vaccine. Autonomous Communities such as Cantabria continue without supplying tetravalent vaccine. The aim of this study was to analyse epidemiological characteristics of influenza type B in Cantabria (2019-2020 season) as well as to establish the predominant lineage and its relation to the recommended vaccine. METHODS: Retrospective study whereby flu diagnosis and lineage analysis were determined by RT-PCR. RESULTS: All samples belonged to the Victoria lineage. Most prevalent viral co-infection was due to SARS-CoV-2. The population affected by influenza B was mainly paediatric and non-vaccinated patients more frequently required hospital admittance. CONCLUSIONS: Influenza type B has a higher incidence in the paediatric population and type A affects more the adult population. Only 28.8% of patients with Influenza B that presented with some underlying condition or risk factor were vaccinated. This shows the need to increase coverage with tetravalent vaccines in order to reduce the burden of disease associated with the Influenza B virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Influenza B virus , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Chi-Square Distribution , Child , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Epidemics , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Retrospective Studies , Seasons , Spain/epidemiology , Statistics, Nonparametric
11.
Value Health ; 24(11): 1578-1585, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331016

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are collected throughout healthcare systems and used in clinical, economic, and outcomes studies to direct patient-centered care and inform health policy. Studies have demonstrated increases in stressors unique to the COVID-19 pandemic, however, their effect on HRQOL is unknown. Our study aimed to assess the change in self-reported global health during the pandemic for patients receiving care in a large healthcare system compared with 1 year earlier. METHODS: An observational cross-sectional study of 2 periods was conducted including adult patients who had a healthcare appointment and completed the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health (PROMIS GH) as standard care during the COVID-19 pandemic and a year earlier. The effect of time on PROMIS global mental health (GMH) and global physical health (GPH) was evaluated through multiple statistical methods. RESULTS: There were 38 037 patients (mean age 56.1 ± 16.6 years; 61% female; 87% white) who completed the PROMIS GH during the pandemic (August 2020) and 33 080 (age 56.7 ± 16.5 years; 61% female; 86% white) who had completed it 1 year earlier (August 2019). GMH was significantly worse, whereas GPH was similar during the pandemic compared with a year earlier (adjusted estimate [standard error]: -1.21 (0.08) and 0.11 (0.08) T-score points, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our study found modest, nonclinically meaningful decreases in GMH and similar GPH during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with a year earlier in patients cared for in a large healthcare system. Nevertheless, healthcare systems are likely seeing a biased sample of patients during these times. Findings from our study have implications for the interpretation of HRQOL during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Global Health/standards , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , Self Report , Statistics, Nonparametric
12.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 21: e0009, 2021. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1308204

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To establish the validity of COVID-19 Peritraumatic Distress Index (CPDI) questionnaire and assess the stress with its associated factors during COVID-19 among dental professionals in Bhubaneswar, India. Material and Methods: An online survey through Google Forms was steered among 234 dentists. CPDI questionnaire was used for data collection post its validation assessment. Content validity was judged satisfactory by two psychiatrists, and excellent internal consistency was found (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92). For statistical analysis, chi-square and binomial logistic regression tests were used with a significance level of p=0.05. Results: 70 (29.9%) were males and 164 (70.1%) were females with a mean age of 30.58 ± 6.70 years. Around 50% had an MDS degree and were attached to an institution and nearly 80% were having experience of less than 10 years. The mean CPDI score was found to be 29.09 ± 15.47. A statistically significant association was observed between CPDI scores with age (p<0.003), gender (p<0.03), practice (p<0.06) and education (p<0.006). Binomial logistic regression revealed that odds of stress were 2 times higher among males than females (OR=2.01, p<0.04), which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Acceptable validation scores confirmed CPDI as an effective instrument for detecting stress. Importance of early interventions to combat the issue of stress among dental professionals as it is allied with negative consequences on health and furthermore affects daily activities is highlighted.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Health Personnel , Dentists , Pandemics , COVID-19 , India/epidemiology , Psychiatry , Chi-Square Distribution , Logistic Models , Cross-Sectional Studies/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 474, 2021 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Defining socio-demographic factors, clinical presentations and underlying diseases associated with COVID-19 severity could be helpful in its management. This study aimed to further clarify the determinants and clinical risk factors of the disease severity in patients infected with COVID-19. METHODS: A multi-centre descriptive study on all patients who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the province of Tehran from March 2020 up to Dec 2020 was conducted. Data on socio-demographic characteristics, clinical presentations, comorbidities, and the health outcomes of 205,654 patients were examined. Characteristics of the study population were described. To assess the association of study variables with the disease severity, the Chi-Squared test and Multiple Logistic Regression model were applied. RESULTS: The mean age of the study population was 52.8 years and 93,612 (45.5%) were women. About half of the patients have presented with low levels of blood oxygen saturation. The ICU admission rate was 17.8% and the overall mortality rate was 10.0%. Older age, male sex, comorbidities including hypertension, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases other than asthma, chronic liver diseases, chronic kidney diseases, chronic neurological disorders, and HIV/AIDS infection were risk markers of poor health outcome. Clinical presentations related with worse prognosis included fever, difficulty breathing, impaired consciousness, and cutaneous manifestations. CONCLUSION: These results might alert physicians to pay attention to determinants and risk factors associated with poor prognosis in patients with COVID-19. In addition, our findings aid decision makers to emphasise on vulnerable groups in the public health strategies that aim at preventing the spread of the disease and its mortalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Chi-Square Distribution , Child , Child, Preschool , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Infant , Iran/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
15.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 21: e0129, 2021. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1209972

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the usefulness of online teaching for undergraduate students during this Corona pandemic, to point the drawbacks of online teaching, and to learn the areas of improvement in online teaching for the future. Material and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study on 130 students was done in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. The questionnaire consisted of two parts, personal details and specific information. The first part of the questionnaire consisted of questions related to age, gender, etc. The second part had questions pertaining to online teaching. Pearson's Chi-square test was applied and the level of significance was set at 5%. Results: Most of the students (83.3%) were in the view that classroom lectures are the best mean of imparting knowledge, which was significant (p<0.001). A significant number of students (88.1%) agreed that online teaching is the best method of teaching apart from classroom teaching. Almost all the students (93%) agreed significantly that online teaching is the best way to learn in this present pandemic scenario. Most students (59.6%) agreed that connectivity/network issue is a major drawback in online teaching, which is again significant (p<0.001). Conclusion: Here in these testing times, the role of online teaching becomes important for medical/dental students, both undergraduates and postgraduates, to keep up with their studies.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Students, Dental , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Dental , COVID-19 , India/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Pilot Projects , Cross-Sectional Studies/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Bull Cancer ; 108(5): 481-489, 2021 May.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179281

ABSTRACT

Confinement within the framework of Covid 19 required organizations in cancer centers, in particular with postponing certain treatments. We interviewed 6080 patients who had a scheduled appointment during this period. 2478 patients gave their opinion regarding access and organization of care, teleconsultation, their concerns and their reasons for satisfaction. While 83 % of them say they are satisfied with the organization of care, 25 % of respondents say they have given up care that they consider essential in 1/3 of cases. The concern related to the follow-up of the cancerous disease takes precedence over that of being infected with the Sars-cov-2 virus, unlike the general population, and relationships with their loved ones are spontaneously cited as a reason for satisfaction. This method captures the experience of patients, despite certain limitations. Such an approach could be used to set up a specific system during normal periods.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , Adult , Aged , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/psychology , Chi-Square Distribution , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Family Relations/psychology , Female , France/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Remote Consultation
17.
Am J Emerg Med ; 47: 164-168, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163279

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The outbreak of COVID-19 disrupted lives across the United States. Evidence shows that such a climate is deleterious to mental health and may increase demand for mental health services in emergency departments. The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in emergency department utilization for mental health diagnoses before and after the COVID-19 surge. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study between January-August 2019 and January-August 2020 with emergency department encounter as the sampling unit. The primary outcome was the proportion of all emergency department encounters attributed to mental health. We performed chi-square analyses to evaluate the differences between 2019 and 2020. RESULTS: We found that overall emergency department volume declined between 2019 and 2020, while the proportion attributable to mental health conditions increased (p < 0.01). Substance abuse, anxiety, and mood disorders accounted for nearly 90% of mental health diagnoses during both periods. When stratified by sex, substance abuse was the leading mental health diagnosis for males and anxiety and substance abuse disorders combined accounted for the largest proportion for females. DISCUSSION: The emergency department is an important community resource for the identification and triage of mental health emergencies. This role is even more important during disasters and extended crises, making it imperative that emergency departments employ experienced mental health staff. This study provides a comparison of emergency department utilization for mental health diagnoses before the pandemic and during the spring 2020 surge and may serve as a useful guide for hospitals, health systems and communities in future planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/therapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Chi-Square Distribution , Connecticut/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy
18.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(16): 2089-2098, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153157

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With evidence of sustained transmission in more than 190 countries, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been declared a global pandemic. Data are urgently needed about risk factors associated with clinical outcomes. METHODS: A retrospective review of 323 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan was conducted. Patients were classified into 3 disease severity groups (nonsevere, severe, and critical), based on initial clinical presentation. Clinical outcomes were designated as favorable and unfavorable, based on disease progression and response to treatments. Logistic regression models were performed to identify risk factors associated with clinical outcomes, and log-rank test was conducted for the association with clinical progression. RESULTS: Current standard treatments did not show significant improvement in patient outcomes. By univariate logistic regression analysis, 27 risk factors were significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Multivariate regression indicated age >65 years (P < .001), smoking (P = .001), critical disease status (P = .002), diabetes (P = .025), high hypersensitive troponin I (>0.04 pg/mL, P = .02), leukocytosis (>10 × 109/L, P < .001), and neutrophilia (>75 × 109/L, P < .001) predicted unfavorable clinical outcomes. In contrast, the administration of hypnotics was significantly associated with favorable outcomes (P < .001), which was confirmed by survival analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Hypnotics may be an effective ancillary treatment for COVID-19. We also found novel risk factors, such as higher hypersensitive troponin I, predicted poor clinical outcomes. Overall, our study provides useful data to guide early clinical decision making to reduce mortality and improve clinical outcomes of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Chi-Square Distribution , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hypnotics and Sedatives/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Young Adult
19.
Front Public Health ; 8: 593491, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081109

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2-infected subjects have been proven contagious in the symptomatic, pre-symptomatic and asymptomatic phase. The identification of these patients is crucial in order to prevent virus circulation. No reliable data on the sensitivity of nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) are available because of the lack of a shared reference standard to identify SARS-CoV-2 infected patients. The aim of our study was to collect data on patients with a known diagnosis of COVID-19 who underwent serial testing to assess NPS sensitivity. Methods: The study was a multi-center, observational, retrospective clinical study with consecutive enrollment. We enrolled patients who met all of the following inclusion criteria: clinical recovery, documented SARS-CoV-2 infection (≥1 positive rRT-PCR result) and ≥1 positive NPS among the first two follow-up swabs. A positive NPS not preceded by a negative nasopharyngeal swab collected 24-48 h earlier was considered a true positive. A negative NPS followed by a positive NPS collected 24-48 h later was regarded as a false negative. The primary outcome was to define sensitivity of SARS-CoV-2 detection with NPS. Results: Three hundred and ninety three NPS were evaluated in 233 patients; the sensitivity was 77% (95% CI, 73 to 81%). Sensitivity of the first follow-up NPS (n = 233) was 79% (95% CI, 73 to 84%) with no significant variations over time. We found no statistically significant differences in the sensitivity of the first follow-up NPS according to time since symptom onset, age, sex, number of comorbidities, and onset symptoms. Conclusions: NPS utility in the diagnostic algorithm of COVID-19 should be reconsidered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Nasopharynx/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/instrumentation , Chi-Square Distribution , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/analysis , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Viral Load
20.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(5): 1247-1252, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1074491

ABSTRACT

Since the end of February 2020, Italy has suffered one of the most severe outbreaks of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, what happened just before the Italian index case has not yet been investigated. To answer this question, we evaluated the potential impact of COVID-19 on the clinical features of a cohort of neurological inpatients admitted right before the Italian index case, as compared to the same period of the previous year. Demographic, clinical, treatment and laboratory data were extracted from medical records. The data collected included all inpatients who had been admitted to the Neurology and Stroke Units of the Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, from December 15, 2018 to February 20, 2019 and from December 15, 2019 to February 20, 2020. Of the 248 patients, 97 subjects (39.1%) were admitted for an acute cerebrovascular event: 46 in the 2018/2019 period (mean [SD] age, 72.3 [15.6] years; 22 men [47.8%]), and 51 in the 2019/2020 interval (mean [SD] age, 72.8 [12.4] years; 24 men [47.1%]). The number of cryptogenic strokes has increased during the 2019-2020 year, as compared to the previous year (30 [58.8%] vs. 18 [39.1%], p = 0.05). These patients had a longer hospitalization (mean [SD] day, 15.7 [10.5] days vs. mean [SD] day, 11.7 [7.2] days, p = 0.03) and more frequent cerebrovascular complications (9 [30.0%] vs. 2 [11.1%]), but presented a lower incidence of cardiocerebral risk factors (18 [60.0%] vs. 14 [77.8%]). Right before the Italian index case, an increase in cryptogenic strokes has occurred, possibly due to the concomitant COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Ischemic Stroke/classification , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Analysis of Variance , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cohort Studies , Contact Tracing/methods , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL