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3.
BMC Womens Health ; 23(1): 294, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240322

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic drastically affected societies globally, prompting rising unemployment, insufficient household incomes, and stress and undermining women's and children's health within families. This study examined family violence and identified influencing factors during the COVID-19 pandemic in Thailand. METHODS: A mixed-method design was used, entailing a questionnaire followed by focus group interviews. A cross-sectional survey was administered to investigate family violence among 1285 female respondents aged 15 years and above who were recruited through stratified sampling. The Cronbach alpha and and inter-raters Kappa coefficient values for the questionnaire were 0.67 and 1.00, respectively. In addition, a descriptive qualitative instrument was employed to analyze the data sets from four focus group interviews held with 32 staff members from agencies that deal with family violence. The researchers jointly developed the focus group questions, which focused on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on family violence. They independently analyzed data using content analysis. RESULTS: The majority of the study participants were aged above 45 years (>50%), married (61.1%), lived in single-family settings (52.5%), had lost their jobs (64.4%), and had economic constraints that were moderate (37.8%) to severe (40.6%). The prevalence of family violence, which was primarily physical, was 42.2%. Family income, stress, and substance abuse were the main factors associated with family violence. These findings were correlated with those from the qualitative interviews. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had indirect impacts through family violence. Women were subjected to family violence behaviors, which were associated with household income, economic status, stress, and substance abuse. These behaviors included psychological and physical violence, as well as sexual abuse. Future interventions should focus on financial support and stress reduction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Domestic Violence , Intimate Partner Violence , Substance-Related Disorders , Child , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Women's Health , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Thailand/epidemiology , Pandemics , Child Health , Risk Factors
4.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285723, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317650

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In order for Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) to be effective, data-based information on families' resources, burden and current use of support services for families with young children, as well as on children's health and development is needed. The study Kinder in Deutschland [Children in Germany]-KiD 0-3 2022 aims at providing these data to help us understand families' situation and needs in Germany now, including families' experience of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: The study will recruit up to 300 pediatricians who will invite parents of children aged up to 48 months to participate in the study during a well-child visit. Parents (goal N = 8,000) will complete an online-questionnaire with their own web-enabled device. Pediatricians will complete a short questionnaire about each participating family. The questionnaires cover family psychosocial burden and resources, child health and development, use of family support services, as well as the families' experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic. Data will be analyzed to assess patterns of families´ psychosocial burdens and resources, use of support services for families with young children, and children´s health and development. Concordance between parent and pediatrician report will be assessed and comparisons with the predecessor study of 2015 will be drawn. DISSEMINATION: Findings will be disseminated through scientific conferences, open access peer-reviewed journals, and dissemination channels of the National Centre for Early Prevention. DISCUSSION: The present study will provide parent and pediatrician reports on how families with young children are doing in Germany. These data will be used to inform Germany's early childhood intervention (ECI) program ("Frühe Hilfen") on current needs of families with young children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Child, Preschool , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parents/psychology , Child Health
6.
J Natl Med Assoc ; 115(3): 321-325, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300580

ABSTRACT

COVID-19's lessons on structural inequality should have been painful and embarrassing to all of us. These daily experiences of an unacceptable status quo among US children are still with us in a post-COVID America. Addressing the multi-sectoral factors that undermine the nation...s health should remain urgent priorities for all health professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Population Health , Child , Humans , United States/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child Health , Health Personnel
7.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1134411, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295657

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically changed the health and wellbeing of children. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between the home environment and the environmental characteristics on 5-18 years old children health in Iran. Method: An online survey was conducted among parents of children aged 5 to 18 living in large cities in Iran in 2021. The statistical population of this cross-sectional study was 500 people. In this survey, questionnaires on the quality of the home environment, exterior and interior landscapes of homes, and the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) were used to investigate the relationship between the home environment and environmental characteristics on 5-18 years old children health during the COVID-19 pandemic. The t-test and analysis of variance were used in SPSS 24, and the structural equation modeling (SEM) was utilized in AMOS 24 for analyzing the data. Results: The average age of respondents was 37.13 ± 7.20, and that of children was 11.57 ± 3.47. 73.02% of the families were covered by insurance, and 74.08% of them lived in the metropolis. In addition, 65.04% of the families complied with the restrictions of the quarantine period. A share of 31% of the families live in villas, and 55% paid more attention to cleaning their homes during the COVID-19 pandemic than before. A positive and significant statistical relationship (ß = 0.414, p < 0.001) was observed between the residence environment and child health. Thus, explained 17.5% of variations in child health. Conclusion: The results showed that the children who lived in homes with an exterior landscape in nature had better health. In addition, the 5-18 years old children whose home landscape was a garden, compared to the other two groups (yard, balcony), had better health. Gardens are a potential source of health and not necessarily replaced by other natural environments, thus providing them along with green space is one of the crucial issues that should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Health , Child , Humans , Child, Preschool , Adolescent , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Iran/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology
8.
JAMA Health Forum ; 2(8): e212921, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280868
10.
J Paediatr Child Health ; 58(12): 2327-2328, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2271569
11.
Nature ; 612(7941): S41, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275218
12.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 73(2): 374-376, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2252071

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has disrupted the mental health services in 93% of the countries worldwide. Approximately 130 countries are affected catastrophically by COVID-19, which limits access to mental health services. Most vulnerable are children, pregnant women, and adults with limited access to mental healthcare. In highlighting the importance of mobilising resources, the WHO has given leaders around the world an opportunity to galvanise efforts. Maternal and children's mental health are crucial factors that may have a lifelong impact. In a post-pandemic world, a renewed focus is required to develop sustainable policies and action plans to support new mothers and new-borns in the first 1,000 days of life. This viewpoint shares a reflective discourse on contextualising the need of investment in mental health in times of crisis and global pandemic and what needs to be catered to in the near future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Pregnancy , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Child Health , Health Facilities , Mothers
13.
JAMA Pediatr ; 177(4): 432-434, 2023 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251466

ABSTRACT

This cross-sectional study uses National Survey of Children's Health data to assess demographic disparities in medical and childcare disruptions during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Care , Child , Humans , Child Day Care Centers , Child Health
14.
Pediatr Radiol ; 53(6): 1179-1187, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262633

ABSTRACT

In terms of number of beneficiaries, Medicaid is the single largest health insurance program in the US. Along with the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), Medicaid covers nearly half of all births and provides health insurance to nearly half of the children in the country. This article provides a broad introduction to Medicaid and CHIP for the pediatric radiologist with a special focus on topics relevant to pediatric imaging and population health. This includes an overview of Medicaid's structure and eligibility criteria and how it differs from Medicare. The paper examines the means-tested programs within the context of pediatric radiology, reviewing pertinent topics such as the rise of Medicaid managed care plans, Medicaid expansion, the effects of Medicaid on child health, and COVID-19. Beyond the basics of benefits coverage, pediatric radiologists should understand how Medicaid and CHIP financing and reimbursement affect the ability of pediatric practices, radiology groups, and hospitals to provide services for children in a sustainable manner. The paper concludes with an analysis of future opportunities for Medicaid and CHIP.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Health Services , Aged , Child , Humans , United States , Medicaid , Child Health , Medicare , Insurance, Health , Radiologists
15.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 62(4): 398-399, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262459

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a devastating impact on youth mental health concerns, with rates of anxiety, depression, and suicidality doubling.1 With 1 in 5 youth now experiencing a mental health disorder, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the Children's Hospital Association, and the US Surgeon General have all declared a national state of emergency in child and adolescent mental health.2,3 Although youth mental health has declined overall since the onset of the pandemic, racial minority youth have been disproportionately negatively impacted. Unfortunately, racial disparities in youth mental health have been a long-standing concern, and the impact of COVID-19 has only served to worsen this gap.2 This is consistent with broader population health trends observed throughout the pandemic across age groups, where a higher proportion of racial and ethnic minorities have experienced poverty, violence, educational and vocational disruptions, and poorer health outcomes, including COVID-19-related hospitalizations and deaths.3,4.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Health , Healthcare Disparities , Mental Health , Racial Groups , Child Psychiatry/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Child Health/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Racism/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Child , Adolescent , Child Development , Racial Groups/statistics & numerical data
17.
Nature ; 612(7941): S42-S43, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2264915
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2257158

ABSTRACT

Today more than half of the world's population lives in urban areas. Children spend about 40 h a week in the school environment. Knowing the influence of school exposure to green/blue spaces could improve the children's health, creating healthier environments and preventing exposure to legal/illegal drugs. This systematic review summarized the main results of published studies on active or passive exposure to green or blue spaces in different domains of child neurodevelopment. In August 2022, five databases were searched and twenty-eight eligible studies were included in the analysis. Cognitive and/or academic performance was the most frequently studied (15/28). Most studies evaluate passive exposure to green/blue spaces (19/28) versus active exposure (9/28). Only three studies addressed the relationship between blue space and neurodevelopment. The main results point toward mixed evidence of a protective relationship between green/blue space exposure and neurodevelopment, especially in improving cognitive/academic performance, attention restoration, behavior, and impulsivity. Renaturalizing school spaces and promoting "greener" capacities for school environmental health could improve children's neurodevelopment. There was great heterogeneity in methodologies and adjustment for confounding factors across studies. Future research should seek a standardized approach to delivering school environmental health interventions beneficial to children's development.


Subject(s)
Environment , School Nursing , Humans , Child , Adolescent , Child Health , Impulsive Behavior , Parks, Recreational
19.
Pediatr Ann ; 52(3): e78-e80, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2247517

ABSTRACT

Trauma has become an important part of medical care as we continue to understand further its effects on health over time. Trauma-informed care therefore has become a necessary part of medical services. Understanding the fundamentals of trauma-informed care and how it was developed is crucial to implementing this care into medical training and across all medical services involved in children's health. This leads to the framework created for the public health approach of trauma-informed care, with primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of management. Social media has also increasingly been implicated in contributing to trauma, including causing vicarious trauma, which can be just as detrimental to health and wellness. If we can encourage advocating for trauma-informed care training and policies across medical services, we can create a system with a focus on this growing factor in health care. [Pediatr Ann. 2023;52(3):e78-e80.].


Subject(s)
Social Media , Child , Humans , Child Health
20.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(3)2023 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240263

ABSTRACT

We are all exposed to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) starting from embryonic life. The fetus and child set up crucial developmental processes allowing adaptation to the environment throughout life: they are extremely sensitive to very low doses of hormones and EDCs because they are developing organisms. Considering the developmental origin of well-being and diseases, every adult organism expresses consequences of the environment in which it developed. The molecular mechanisms through which the main EDCs manifest their effects and their potential association with endocrine disorders, such as diabetes, obesity, thyroid disease and alteration of adrenal hormones, will be reviewed here. Despite 40 years having passed since the first study on EDCs, little is yet known about them; therefore, our purpose is to take stock of the situation to establish a starting point for further studies. Since there is plenty of evidence showing that exposure to EDCs may adversely impact the health of adults and children through altered endocrine function-suggesting their link to endocrinopathies-it is essential in this context to bear in mind what is already known about endocrine disruptors and to deepen our knowledge to establish rules of conduct aimed at limiting exposure to EDCs' negative effects. Considering that during the COVID-19 pandemic an increase in endocrine disruptor effects has been reported, it will also be useful to address this new phenomenon for better understanding its basis and limiting its consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocrine Disruptors , Child , Adult , Humans , Endocrine Disruptors/toxicity , Child Health , Pandemics , Hormones
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