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2.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(4): S107-S122, 2021 08.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325947

ABSTRACT

The Subcommittee on the Rights of the Child and the Social Pediatrics Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría carried out a fieldwork that allowed us to give a voice to our children and adolescents (NNA), during quarantine and social isolation mandatory imposed in our country by the global pandemic COVID-19. The objectives were to analyze the impact on their feelings, emotions and desires; evaluate and compare personal, family and social repercussions pre, intra and post quarantine; and identify support and containment needs. The results of the research allow us to affirm that children have been the most vulnerable and the least listened to. The quarantine has had an enormous individual, social and family impact on children and adolescents and calls for a holistic, committed and joint approach from civil society, families, health professionals, teachers and political authorities.


La Subcomisión de Derechos del Niño y el Comité de Pediatría Social, de la Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría, realizaron un trabajo de campo que permitiera dar voz a nuestros niños, niñas y adolescentes (NNA) durante la cuarentena y el aislamiento social obligatorio impuestos en nuestro país por la pandemia mundial por la enfermedad por el nuevo coronavirus (COVID-19). Los objetivos fueron relevar el impacto sobre sus sentimientos, emociones y deseos; evaluar y comparar las repercusiones personales, familiares y sociales antes, durante y después de la cuarentena; e identificar las necesidades de apoyo y contención. Los resultados de la investigación permiten afirmar que los niños han sido los más afectados y los menos escuchados. La cuarentena ha tenido un enorme impacto individual, social y familiar en los NNA, y reclama un abordaje holístico, comprometido y mancomunado de la sociedad civil, las familias, los profesionales de la salud, los docentes y las autoridades políticas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Child Welfare/psychology , Emotions , Perception , Quarantine/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adolescent Health , Argentina , Child , Child Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Human Rights , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Physical Distancing , Qualitative Research
4.
Child Abuse Negl ; 118: 105136, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252567

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has had a major impact on child abuse and neglect (CAN) in the U.S. leading to a change in the number of reported screened-in CAN investigations, missed prevention cases, and missed CAN cases. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the deficit number of CAN investigations and resultant estimated number of missed prevention and CAN cases due to the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. from March 2020 to December 2020. METHODS: Secondary data analyses of administrative child welfare data from January 2013 to December 2020 from New York City, Florida, New Jersey and Wisconsin were conducted. Spline regression modeling controlling for autocorrelation was utilized to explore any significant changes once the pandemic began in March 2020 in the number of screened-in CAN investigations. The seven-year monthly average of screen-in CAN investigations for March through December from 2013 to 2019 was calculated and compared to the numbers of CAN investigations for March 2020 to December 2020. The resultant number of missed prevention cases and CAN cases was estimated for the four jurisdictions and used to approximate the number of missed prevention cases and CAN cases in the U.S., as well as the projected estimation of national lifetime economic costs. RESULTS: Prior to the pandemic, there were insignificant monthly increases of 0.7 CAN investigations in NYC and 6.2 CAN investigations in Florida, a significant monthly increase 4.2 CAN investigations in New Jersey and an insignificant monthly decrease in 0.6 CAN investigations in Wisconsin. Once the pandemic began, there were significant monthly decreases (p < .001) in each of the four jurisdictions, including 1425.6 fewer CAN investigations in NYC, 3548.0 fewer CAN investigations in Florida, 963.0 fewer CAN investigations in New Jersey and 529.1 fewer CAN investigations in Wisconsin. There were an estimated 60,791 fewer CAN investigations in these four jurisdictions from March 2020 to December 2020 of which there were approximately 18,540 missed prevention and CAN cases suggesting up to $4.2 billion in lifetime economic costs. It was estimated that were 623,137 children not investigated for CAN in the U.S. during the same 10-month period. This suggests that there were an estimated 85,993 children were missed for prevention services and about 104,040 children were missed for CAN with a potential lifetime economic impact of up to $48.1 billion in the U.S. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a precipitous drop in CAN investigations where almost 200,000 children are estimated to have been missed for prevention services and CAN in a 10-month period. There are opportunities for the child welfare jurisdictions to work with partner education, public health, social service and other providers to strategically approach this very grave issue in order to mitigate its impact on this very vulnerable population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Child Abuse/psychology , Child Abuse/trends , Child Welfare/psychology , Child Welfare/trends , Child , Family/psychology , Florida/epidemiology , Humans , Male , New Jersey/epidemiology , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Wisconsin/epidemiology
6.
J Soc Work End Life Palliat Care ; 17(2-3): 218-236, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135780

ABSTRACT

This manuscript illuminates the nuanced ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the pediatric palliative care social work role and clinical care in caring for children with life-limiting illnesses and their families throughout the country. The authors discuss memorable moments, logistical impacts, telehealth usage, decision-making experiences, end of life care, bereavement practices, specialized interventions, and self-care. The paper concludes with lessons learned and practical recommendations for the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Child Welfare/psychology , Palliative Care/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Social Workers/psychology , Attitude to Death , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Depression/psychology , Humans
7.
Acad Med ; 96(9): 1254-1258, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104982

ABSTRACT

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, women in medicine, including faculty, residents, medical students, and other health care workers (HCWs), are facing unparalleled challenges. The burdens of pandemic-associated increases in domestic and caregiving responsibilities, professional demands, health risks associated with contracting COVID-19, and the resulting psychosocial distress have exacerbated existing gender disparities at home, at work, and in academia. School and day care closures have created additional childcare needs, primarily for women, yet little support exists for parents and families. These increased childcare and domestic responsibilities have forced women HCWs, who make up the overwhelming majority of the workforce, to adapt their schedules and, in some cases, leave their jobs entirely. In this article, the authors detail how COVID-19 has exacerbated existing childcare accessibility and affordability issues as well as gender disparities. They argue that unless government and health care organization support for childcare increases, families, specifically women and children, will continue to suffer. Lack of access to affordable childcare can prevent HCWs from doing their jobs, including conducting and publishing academic scholarship. This poses incalculable risks to families, science, and society. COVID-19 should serve as a call to action to all sectors, including the government and health care organizations, to prioritize childcare provision and increase support for women HCWs, both now during the pandemic and going forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Care/trends , Family , Health Personnel , Sexism/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child Care/economics , Child Care/organization & administration , Child Day Care Centers/economics , Child Day Care Centers/trends , Child Health/trends , Child Welfare/economics , Child Welfare/psychology , Child Welfare/trends , Child, Preschool , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/trends , Humans , Infant , Mental Health/trends , Physicians, Women/psychology , Physicians, Women/supply & distribution , Physicians, Women/trends , United States , Women's Health/trends
8.
Child Abuse Negl ; 116(Pt 2): 104945, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1053269

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Media outlets have suggested that rates of child maltreatment may increase during the global COVID-19 pandemic. The few empirical studies that have examined pandemic related changes in rates of child maltreatment have relied predominantly on reports of suspected maltreatment. OBJECTIVE: This study examines rates of documented, substantiated child maltreatment resulting in foster care placement, as well as demographic correlates of child maltreatment within the foster care system, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Data were available for all youth in the FL foster care system from January 1, 2001 through June 30, 2020 (i.e., > 304,000 youth; > 1.1 million total placements). METHODS: This study utilizes data from the Florida State Automated Child Welfare Information System (SACWIS). RESULTS: Results revealed a decrease in the number of youths placed in the FL foster care system during the COVID-19 pandemic with the greatest reduction in April, 2020 during the Safer-at-Home Order (24 % fewer youth in 2020 than 2019). In contrast, the percentage of placements into foster care due to maltreatment increased by 3.34 %. Demographic-linked differences were observed in placement rates and exposure to maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: While prior work suggests that reports of child maltreatment have decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, this study demonstrates that overall rates of substantiated maltreatment resulting in foster care placement have increased for White youth, while rates of placement of due to inadequate supervision, emotional neglect, and/or parental substance use have decreased for Black youth. Implications for policy and future research are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Abuse , Foster Home Care , Adolescent , Child , Child Abuse/psychology , Child Welfare/psychology , Child, Preschool , Female , Florida , Foster Home Care/psychology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Pastoral Care Counsel ; 74(4): 292-293, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-968016

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 cannot rob us of our ability to perform our ministry for children. As adults and ministers, we can show our support for the spiritual growth of children. COVID-19 has not deprived us of our creativity in praise, telling of God's love, prayers, and support for all the children and parents. COVID-19 has not defeated our spiritual life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Child Welfare/psychology , Spirituality , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , Child , Humans , Love , Object Attachment , Parenting/psychology , Pastoral Care/methods , Religion
10.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0240962, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-874207

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID- 19 outbreak in the Netherlands (March 2020) and the associated social distancing measures, families were enforced to stay at home as much as possible. Adolescents and their families may be particularly affected by this enforced proximity, as adolescents strive to become more independent. Yet, whether these measures impact emotional well-being in families with adolescents has not been examined. In this ecological momentary assessment study, we investigated if the COVID-19 pandemic affected positive and negative affect of parents and adolescents and parenting behaviors (warmth and criticism). Additionally, we examined possible explanations for the hypothesized changes in affect and parenting. To do so, we compared daily reports on affect and parenting that were gathered during two periods of 14 consecutive days, once before the COVID-19 pandemic (2018-2019) and once during the COVID-19 pandemic. Multilevel analyses showed that only parents' negative affect increased as compared to the period before the pandemic, whereas this was not the case for adolescents' negative affect, positive affect and parenting behaviors (from both the adolescent and parent perspective). In general, intolerance of uncertainty was linked to adolescents' and parents' negative affect and adolescents' positive affect. However, Intolerance of uncertainty, nor any pandemic related characteristics (i.e. living surface, income, relatives with COVID-19, hours of working at home, helping children with school and contact with COVID-19 patients at work) were linked to the increase of parents' negative affect during COVID-19. It can be concluded that on average, our sample (consisting of relatively healthy parents and adolescents) seems to deal fairly well with the circumstances. The substantial heterogeneity in the data however, also suggest that whether or not parents and adolescents experience (emotional) problems can vary from household to household. Implications for researchers, mental health care professionals and policy makers are discussed.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Child Welfare/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Parenting/psychology , Parents/psychology , Paternal Behavior/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Affect , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Uncertainty
11.
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev ; 51(5): 671-682, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-694603

ABSTRACT

Research confirms that the mental health burdens following community-wide disasters are extensive, with pervasive impacts noted in individuals and families. It is clear that child disaster outcomes are worst among children of highly distressed caregivers, or those caregivers who experience their own negative mental health outcomes from the disaster. The current study used path analysis to examine concurrent patterns of parents' (n = 420) experience from a national sample during the early months of the U.S. COVID-19 pandemic. The results of a multi-group path analysis, organized by parent gender, indicate good fit to the data [X2(10) = 159.04, p < .01]. Results indicate significant linkages between parents' caregiver burden, mental health, and perceptions of children's stress; these in turn are significantly linked to child-parent closeness and conflict, indicating possible spillover effects for depressed parents and compensatory effects for anxious parents. The impact of millions of families sheltering in place during the COVID-19 pandemic for an undefined period of time may lead to unprecedented impacts on individuals' mental health with unknown impacts on child-parent relationships. These impacts may be heightened for families whose caregivers experience increased mental health symptoms, as was the case for fathers in the current sample.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological , Caregivers/psychology , Child Welfare/psychology , Coronavirus Infections , Mental Health/trends , Pandemics , Parent-Child Relations , Parenting/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Betacoronavirus , Burnout, Psychological/etiology , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parents/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology
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