Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 27
Filter
1.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 68(6): 1157-1169, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504878

ABSTRACT

Pediatric gastroenterologists took on a variety of challenges during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, including learning about a new disease and how to recognize and manage it, prevent its spread among their patients and health professions colleagues, and make decisions about managing patients with chronic gastrointestinal and liver problems in light of the threat. They adapted their practice to accommodate drastically decreased numbers of in-person visits, adopting telehealth technologies, and instituting new protocols to perform endoscopies safely. The workforce pipeline was also affected by the impact of the pandemic on trainee education, clinical experience, research, and job searches.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Health Equity/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Social Determinants of Health , Child , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Socioeconomic Factors , United States
3.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 68(5): 1081-1091, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415700

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has spread rapidly across the world in 2020, affecting both adults and, to a lesser extent, children. In this article, the authors describe the neurologic manifestations of COVID-19 in children, including the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, laboratory and imaging findings, and treatment options. The management of patients with concomitant neuroimmunologic disorders and drug interactions between medications used to treat COVID-19 and other neurologic disorders (especially immune-modifying drugs) is also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Child , Comorbidity , Humans
4.
Am J Nurs ; 121(6): 14, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322668
5.
JAMA Pediatr ; 175(9): 928-938, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274655

ABSTRACT

Importance: Although children mainly experience mild COVID-19 disease, hospitalization rates are increasing, with limited understanding of underlying factors. There is an established association between race and severe COVID-19 outcomes in adults in England; however, whether a similar association exists in children is unclear. Objective: To investigate the association between race and childhood COVID-19 testing and hospital outcomes. Design, Setting, Participants: In this cohort study, children (0-18 years of age) from participating family practices in England were identified in the QResearch database between January 24 and November 30, 2020. The QResearch database has individually linked patients with national SARS-CoV-2 testing, hospital admission, and mortality data. Exposures: The main characteristic of interest is self-reported race. Other exposures were age, sex, deprivation level, geographic region, household size, and comorbidities (asthma; diabetes; and cardiac, neurologic, and hematologic conditions). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was hospital admission with confirmed COVID-19. Secondary outcomes were SARS-CoV-2-positive test result and any hospital attendance with confirmed COVID-19 and intensive care admission. Results: Of 2 576 353 children (mean [SD] age, 9.23 [5.24] years; 48.8% female), 410 726 (15.9%) were tested for SARS-CoV-2 and 26 322 (6.4%) tested positive. A total of 1853 children (0.07%) with confirmed COVID-19 attended hospital, 343 (0.01%) were admitted to the hospital, and 73 (0.002%) required intensive care. Testing varied across race. White children had the highest proportion of SARS-CoV-2 tests (223 701/1 311 041 [17.1%]), whereas Asian children (33 213/243 545 [13.6%]), Black children (7727/93 620 [8.3%]), and children of mixed or other races (18 971/147 529 [12.9%]) had lower proportions. Compared with White children, Asian children were more likely to have COVID-19 hospital admissions (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.62; 95% CI, 1.12-2.36), whereas Black children (adjusted OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 0.90-2.31) and children of mixed or other races (adjusted OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.93-2.10) had comparable hospital admissions. Asian children were more likely to be admitted to intensive care (adjusted OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.07-4.14), and Black children (adjusted OR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.08-4.94) and children of mixed or other races (adjusted OR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.25-3.65) had longer hospital admissions (≥36 hours). Conclusions and Relevance: In this large population-based study exploring the association between race and childhood COVID-19 testing and hospital outcomes, several race-specific disparities were observed in severe COVID-19 outcomes. However, ascertainment bias and residual confounding in this cohort study should be considered before drawing any further conclusions. Overall, findings of this study have important public health implications internationally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , /statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child Health , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , England , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Socioeconomic Factors
6.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 68(5): 1103-1118, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240538

ABSTRACT

Limiting exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus has been the major principle guiding public health measures. Masking, social distancing, as well as frequent hand hygiene have been the chief nonpharmaceutical interventions as preventive strategies for all age groups. Advancement in vaccine development and vaccination of large populations offer a glimmer of hope for containing and ending this pandemic. However, until immunization is widespread in the community, masking, social distancing, and frequent handwashing, as well as early detection and isolation of infected persons, should be continued to curb the spread of illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Health Education/methods , Quarantine/standards , Adolescent , Child , Hand Disinfection/standards , Humans , Public Health , Social Isolation
7.
J Sch Health ; 91(7): 555-561, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231145

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Top public health experts and organizations strongly recommend universal masking for children older than 2 years old during the COVID-19 pandemic, but speculate it may be difficult for young children. This study sought to assess the usage of cloth face masks in grades pre-K-2 and identify associated characteristics and adverse events. It is the first data to assess mask wearing by young children in school. METHODS: This online, prospective, observational, survey in multiple schools within a single school district in a major metropolitan area measured adherence to face covering mandates by students in grades pre-K-2 as measured by percentage of day with appropriate face mask wearing per report via daily teacher surveys for the first 4 weeks of school. RESULTS: The primary outcome was percent of the day that the entire class was wearing their masks appropriately. Of the estimated almost 1000 students and 1048 classroom days reported, the mean percentage of the school day with appropriate mask usage was 76.9%. CONCLUSIONS: For a majority of the day while conducting in-person instruction, children in grades pre-K-2 are able to adhere to mask wearing as a key mitigation strategy for limiting SARS-CoV2 infection spread and possible future use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Masks/statistics & numerical data , School Health Services/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Physical Distancing , Prospective Studies , Students/statistics & numerical data , United States
8.
J Sch Health ; 91(7): 584-591, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2014, the Hawaii Department of Education (DOE), the only statewide school system in the United States, predominately enrolled children (keiki) from underserved communities and lacked school nurses or a school health program. Chronic absenteeism due to health concerns was identified as a barrier to academic success. METHODS: The DOE and a public university created Hawaii Keiki: Healthy and Ready to Learn (HK), a program to provide school-based services for 170 Title 1 schools in urban and rural settings and build momentum for statewide collective action. HK has maintained support from public and private entities to address student health. RESULTS: This paper describes 5 years of program development, implementation, and continuing challenges. Most recently in 2020-2021, HK pivoted in the face of school campus closings due to COVID-19 with strategic plans, including telehealth, to move forward in this changed school environment. CONCLUSIONS: The HK program has increased awareness of students' needs and is addressing the imperative to build health services within public schools. The multipronged approach of building awareness of need, providing direct services, educating future care providers, and supporting sound policy development, has an impact that goes beyond any one individual area.


Subject(s)
Child Health/statistics & numerical data , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Community Networks/organization & administration , Health Promotion/organization & administration , School Health Services/organization & administration , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cooperative Behavior , Hawaii , Humans , Program Evaluation
9.
Am J Nurs ; 121(5): 26-37, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1191116

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted the health of children worldwide. Although overall mortality from COVID-19 in children remains low, an associated multisystem inflammatory disorder has emerged. The disorder has been recognized and named multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This comprehensive review describes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, other potential diagnoses, and treatments relevant to MIS-C. The review also includes patient and family education and anticipatory guidance, and discusses nursing implications for nurses working in various roles and settings, including direct care, research, and public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/nursing , Child , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/nursing
12.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 61(4): E497-E500, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102692

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted most of the routine outpatient activities in Italian hospitals and Prevention Departments, including those vaccinations which were not urgent and/or scheduled for children aged 0-6 years. Since June 2020, when the pandemic entered a milder phase, in the alpine Province of Belluno (Veneto, North-Eastern Italy), 12,152 doses of vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis have been administered by means of the innovative "drive-through" modality. No significant adverse events have occurred and popular demand has steadily grown, proving the "drive-through" approach to be safe, efficient and successful.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Encephalitis, Tick-Borne/prevention & control , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage , Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Child , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Encephalitis, Tick-Borne/immunology , Humans , Italy
16.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E01, 2021 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061494

ABSTRACT

We examined levels of very low food security (VLFS) among low-income households with children in California before and shortly after the economic downturn from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Households were randomly sampled in 2018, 2019, and 2020; 11,653 mothers were administered the US Department of Agriculture 6-item Food Security Survey Module. Post-COVID-19 (April 27 to July 21, 2020, a period when stay-at-home restrictions were eased in the state), 14.0% of mothers reported VLFS versus 19.3% pre-COVID-19 (November 21, 2019, to March 14, 2020) (P = .003), 22.2% in 2019 (P < .001), and 19.0% in 2018 (P = .004). Existing systems to quickly obtain food assistance benefits in California and new federal benefits available in response to COVID-19 may have reduced VLFS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Welfare , Chronic Disease , Food Security , Poverty/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , California/epidemiology , Child , Child Welfare/economics , Child Welfare/ethnology , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Chronic Disease/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Family Characteristics , Female , Food Security/methods , Food Security/standards , Food Security/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Mothers , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
20.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 36(2): 99-103, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975796

ABSTRACT

For over a century, community health workers (CHWs) have acted as agents of social justice, health care promotion, and change for the underresourced communities they serve and come from. Over 50,000 CHWs are employed in the United States, and this number is growing with the need for CHWs to help fight both the COVID-19 pandemic and social injustice plaguing our nation. Even with many students learning from home, it is crucial that healthcare be integrated into the school system since a child's health greatly affects their ability to learn. CHWs in schools can help overcome community and cultural barriers to connect families to various community resources and provide important health screenings and education. On return to the traditional classroom, the myriad of tasks such as infection prevention, contact tracing, and temperature screening are not feasible for a school nurse to do alone. CHWs may be just the leaders we need to help schools address the challenges faced in 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Community Health Services/organization & administration , Community Health Workers/education , COVID-19/nursing , Child , Community Health Workers/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Nursing Assistants/education , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , School Nursing/organization & administration , United States
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...