Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.935
Filter
Add filters

Year range
3.
Bull Cancer ; 107(5): 528-537, 2020 05.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-699620
4.
Radiother Oncol ; 148: 203-210, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696923

ABSTRACT

The epidemic of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) first broke out in Wuhan in December 2019, and reached its peak in Wuhan in February 2020. It became a major public health challenge for China, and evolved into a global pandemic in March 2020. For radiation oncology departments, the COVID-19 pandemic presents a unique challenge for disease protection and prevention for both patients and staff, owing to the weakened immune systems of cancer patients and the need to deliver timely and uninterrupted radiotherapy. At the Hubei Cancer Hospital, the only hospital in Wuhan that specializes in oncology, we organized an emergency infection control team to lead special efforts to combat COVID-19 during this challenging time. Under its lead, the following measures were implemented in the radiation oncology department: the radiotherapy clinic was divided into different infection control zones with varying levels of protection; special staff and patient infection control training sessions were conducted and appropriate measures deployed; daily symptom testing criteria were implemented for patients undergoing treatment; special rotating schedules and infection control methods were implemented for various staff members such as medical physicists/dosimetrists and radiation therapists; modified radiotherapy workflow and specialized treatment area cleaning and disinfection policies and procedures were designed and executed; and special medical waste disposal methods were implemented. We began treating patients using this new COVID-19 radiotherapy treatment workflow and infection control measures on January 30, 2020. During more than one and a half months of uninterrupted radiation oncology clinical operation through the worst of the Wuhan outbreak, no known COVID-19 infection occurred at our radiotherapy center to our patients or employees. This report may provide valuable information for other radiation oncology departments during this unprecedented public health crisis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Cancer Care Facilities/legislation & jurisprudence , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Workflow
5.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(7): 994-997, 2020 Jul 10.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696133

ABSTRACT

An outbreak of severe pneumonia of unknown cause was reported in December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei province, China. The infectious virus was soon identified and named as 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). The name of the COVID-19 was given by WHO on 11 February 2020. It has so far caused about 118 000 cases in 114 countries including China ending March 10, and was characterized as a pandemic by WHO on March 11. We still face great challenges in control of the epidemic: uncertain initial source of infection, infected populations widely scattered, complex routs of transmission, populations generally susceptible, high contagiousness of the virus, and finally vaccines unlikely available in the near future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , China , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(7): e19982, 2020 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-694306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An extensive amount of information related to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic was disseminated by mass and social media in China. To date, there is limited evidence on how this infodemic may influence psychobehavioral responses to the crisis. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to assess the psychobehavioral responses to the COVID-19 outbreak and examine their associations with mass and social media exposure. METHODS: A cross-sectional study among medical and health sciences students from the Fujian Medical University in Fuzhou, China, was conducted between April 6-22, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 2086 completed responses were received. Multivariable analyses demonstrated that four constructs of the Health Belief Model (HBM)-higher perception of susceptibility (odds ratio [OR] 1.44; 95% CI 1.07-1.94), severity (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.10-1.59), self-efficacy (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.21-2.15), and perceived control or intention to carry out prevention measures (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.09-1.59)-were significantly associated with a higher mass media exposure score, whereas only three constructs-higher perception of severity (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.19-1.72), self-efficacy (OR 1.85; 95% CI 1.38-2.48), and perceived control or intention to carry out prevention measures (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.08-1.58)-were significantly associated with a higher social media exposure score. Lower emotional consequences and barriers to carry out prevention measures were also significantly associated with greater mass and social media exposure. Our findings on anxiety levels revealed that 38.1% (n=795; 95% CI 36.0-40.2) of respondents reported moderate-to-severe anxiety. A lower anxiety level was significantly associated with higher mass and social media exposure in the univariable analyses; however, the associations were not significant in the multivariable analyses. CONCLUSIONS: In essence, both mass and social media are useful means of disseminating health messages and contribute to the betterment of psychobehavioral responses to COVID-19. Our findings stress the importance of the credibility of information shared through mass and social media outlets and viable strategies to counter misinformation during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adolescent , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Mass Media , Social Media , Students, Medical , Young Adult
8.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(7): 990-993, 2020 Jul 10.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693524

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak in China has been gradually controlled. At present, the management and risk assessment of asymptomatic infected cases has become an urgent problem to be addressed. Asymptomatic case is mainly detected by close contact screening, cluster epidemic investigation, infection source tracking investigation, and active detection of target population. Currently, research on the spread risk from asymptomatic cases was limited, and lacking the data relates to the distribution of asymptomatic cases in large community population. Pathogen detection using PCR is suitable for screening in close contacts of confirmed cases and should be started as early as possible. The antibody test is more suitable for screening in general population where the source of infection is unclear. The management of asymptomatic cases now in China focuses on isolation and medical observation according to the guideline of "early detection, early report, early isolation and early treatment" .


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
10.
Ren Fail ; 42(1): 726-732, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691320

ABSTRACT

AIM: Novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) has become pandemic. It brings serious threat to hemodialysis (HD) patients. Therefore, we carried out a study on the clinical characteristics of HD patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 31 HD patients with COVID-19. The clinical features of patients include epidemiology, clinical symptoms, laboratory and imaging test, treatment and prognosis. RESULTS: 61.3% were severe, and 38.7% were mild. 83.9% had a close contact history with COVID-19 patients. The average age was 62.3 years comprising of 58.1% men and 41.9% women. Ninety percent had chronic diseases except ESRD. Clinical symptoms include cough (85%), fever (43%), and shortness of breath (48.4%), etc. Complications included ARDS (25.8%), AHF (22.6%), and septic shock (16.1%), etc. 64.5% of patients had remission, and 35.5% of patients had no remission with 6.5% deaths. Compared with the baseline before infection, HD patients with COVID-19 had lower lymphocytes, albumin and glucose, and higher D-dimer, albumin, phosphorus, lactate dehydrogenase, and CRP. There was no significant correlation between the neutrophils/lymphocytes ratio and the severity of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the reported general population, the HD patients are susceptible to COVID-19 infection, especially older men and those with other underlying diseases. Moreover, HD patients have more severe infection and inflammation with less symptoms and worse outcome. COVID-19 infection can cause dialysis patients lower immunity, stronger inflammation, malnutrition, and internal environment disorder. Neutrophils/lymphocytes ratio does not reflect the severity of the HD patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
11.
Zhonghua Jie He He Hu Xi Za Zhi ; 43(8): 654-658, 2020 Aug 12.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691318

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the epidemiological and clinical characteristics, and imaging features of patients with COVID-19 in Henan Province People's Hospital. Methods: The epidemiology, clinical symptoms, laboratory and radiologic data of 49 patients with COVID-19 infection admitted to the department of infectious disease in our hospital from January 23, 2020 to February 22, 2020 were retrospectively analyzed. All analyses were performed with SPSS software, version 22.0. Results: A total of 49 patients with COVID-19 were enrolled, of which 28 were ordinary, 16 were severe, and 5 were critical in disease severity. The average ages of the 3 groups were (46±19) , (60±16) and (68±20) years, with statistical differences (P=0.015). Common symptoms at the onset were fever (41 patients), dry cough (35 patients), and fatigue (21 patients). Epidemiological investigations found that 31 (63%) patients had direct or indirect contact with confirmed cases, and 14 cases were family clustered. Laboratory test results showed that the lymphocyte counts progressively decreased [0.85 (0.5-1.6) ×10(9)/L,0.51 (0.4-0.9) ×10(9)/L and 0.43 (0.47-0.61) ×10(9)/L, respectively], while LDH [162 (145.1-203.5) U/L,265 (195.3-288.4) U/L and 387 (312.3-415.5) U/L, respectively] and D-dimer [0.15 (0.09-0.40) mg/L,0.4 (0.2-0.6) mg/L and 0.9 (0.5-1.4) mg/L, respectively] were significantly increased (P<0.05), in all the 3 groups. The levels of IL-6 [(43.2±15.4) µg/L, (78.5±31.2) µg/L and (132.4±47.9) µg/L, respectively] and IL-10 [(3.5±3.2) µg/L, (7.6±6.4) µg/L and (9.4±7.2) µg/L respectively] increased significantly with disease severity. Pulmonary imaging of ordinary patients mainly showed unilateral or bilateral multiple infiltrates, while severe and critically ill patients showed diffuse exudation and consolidation of both lungs, and a few patients showed signs of "white lungs". Conclusions: Patients with COVID-19 has a definite history of contact with diagnosed patients, and has family aggregation. The clinical symptoms were mainly fever and dry cough. Laboratory results showed that lymphocyte count, LDH, D-dimer, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 levels had a significant correlation with the severity of the disease, which could be used as markers for disease progression and prognosis. Pulmonary imaging showed unilateral or bilateral ground glass infiltration. In severe and critically ill patients, diffuse infiltration and consolidation or even "white lung" were present.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , China , Humans , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
12.
PLoS Med ; 17(7): e1003195, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691282

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As of June 1, 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused more than 6,000,000 infected persons and 360,000 deaths globally. Previous studies revealed pregnant women with COVID-19 had similar clinical manifestations to nonpregnant women. However, little is known about the outcome of neonates born to infected women. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this retrospective study, we studied 29 pregnant women with COVID-19 infection delivered in 2 designated general hospitals in Wuhan, China between January 30 and March 10, 2020, and 30 neonates (1 set of twins). Maternal demographic characteristics, delivery course, symptoms, and laboratory tests from hospital records were extracted. Neonates were hospitalized if they had symptoms (5 cases) or their guardians agreed to a hospitalized quarantine (13 cases), whereas symptom-free neonates also could be discharged after birth and followed up through telephone (12 cases). For hospitalized neonates, laboratory test results and chest X-ray or computed tomography (CT) were extracted from hospital records. The presence of antibody of SARS-CoV-2 was assessed in the serum of 4 neonates. Among 29 pregnant COVID-19-infected women (13 confirmed and 16 clinical diagnosed), the majority had higher education (56.6%), half were employed (51.7%), and their mean age was 29 years. Fourteen women experienced mild symptoms including fever (8), cough (9), shortness of breath (3), diarrhea (2), vomiting (1), and 15 were symptom-free. Eleven of 29 women had pregnancy complications, and 27 elected to have a cesarean section delivery. Of 30 neonates, 18 were admitted to Wuhan Children's Hospital for quarantine and care, whereas the other 12 neonates discharged after birth without any symptoms and had normal follow-up. Five hospitalized neonates were diagnosed as COVID-19 infection (2 confirmed and 3 suspected). In addition, 12 of 13 other hospitalized neonates presented with radiological features for pneumonia through X-ray or CT screening, 1 with occasional cough and the others without associated symptoms. SARS-CoV-2 specific serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were measured in 4 neonates and 2 were positive. The limited sample size limited statistical comparison between groups. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we observed COVID-19 or radiological features of pneumonia in some, but not all, neonates born to women with COVID-19 infection. These findings suggest that intrauterine or intrapartum transmission is possible and warrants clinical caution and further investigation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, ChiCTR2000031954 (Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes of Women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19): a multicenter retrospective cohort study).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Retrospective Studies
13.
PLoS Med ; 17(7): e1003189, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690567

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As of 16 May 2020, more than 4.5 million cases and more than 300,000 deaths from disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been reported. Reliable estimates of mortality from SARS-CoV-2 infection are essential for understanding clinical prognosis, planning healthcare capacity, and epidemic forecasting. The case-fatality ratio (CFR), calculated from total numbers of reported cases and reported deaths, is the most commonly reported metric, but it can be a misleading measure of overall mortality. The objectives of this study were to (1) simulate the transmission dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 using publicly available surveillance data and (2) infer estimates of SARS-CoV-2 mortality adjusted for biases and examine the CFR, the symptomatic case-fatality ratio (sCFR), and the infection-fatality ratio (IFR) in different geographic locations. METHOD AND FINDINGS: We developed an age-stratified susceptible-exposed-infected-removed (SEIR) compartmental model describing the dynamics of transmission and mortality during the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic. Our model accounts for two biases: preferential ascertainment of severe cases and right-censoring of mortality. We fitted the transmission model to surveillance data from Hubei Province, China, and applied the same model to six regions in Europe: Austria, Bavaria (Germany), Baden-Württemberg (Germany), Lombardy (Italy), Spain, and Switzerland. In Hubei, the baseline estimates were as follows: CFR 2.4% (95% credible interval [CrI] 2.1%-2.8%), sCFR 3.7% (3.2%-4.2%), and IFR 2.9% (2.4%-3.5%). Estimated measures of mortality changed over time. Across the six locations in Europe, estimates of CFR varied widely. Estimates of sCFR and IFR, adjusted for bias, were more similar to each other but still showed some degree of heterogeneity. Estimates of IFR ranged from 0.5% (95% CrI 0.4%-0.6%) in Switzerland to 1.4% (1.1%-1.6%) in Lombardy, Italy. In all locations, mortality increased with age. Among individuals 80 years or older, estimates of the IFR suggest that the proportion of all those infected with SARS-CoV-2 who will die ranges from 20% (95% CrI 16%-26%) in Switzerland to 34% (95% CrI 28%-40%) in Spain. A limitation of the model is that count data by date of onset are required, and these are not available in all countries. CONCLUSIONS: We propose a comprehensive solution to the estimation of SARS-Cov-2 mortality from surveillance data during outbreaks. The CFR is not a good predictor of overall mortality from SARS-CoV-2 and should not be used for evaluation of policy or comparison across settings. Geographic differences in IFR suggest that a single IFR should not be applied to all settings to estimate the total size of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in different countries. The sCFR and IFR, adjusted for right-censoring and preferential ascertainment of severe cases, are measures that can be used to improve and monitor clinical and public health strategies to reduce the deaths from SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Models, Statistical , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
14.
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med ; 56(3): 335-338, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689752

ABSTRACT

Corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a new disease characterized by lung damage and involvement in multiple tissues and organs in the whole body. Some of the patients may have long-term impairment and dysfunctions, including pulmonary fibrosis, heart, liver, kidney, nerve and immune system. Rehabilitation has certain beneficial effect in the acute stage, and especially in the recovery stage, including improving respiratory function, exercise endurance, self-care in daily living activities, as well as psychological support, etc. Rehabilitation is not offside or absent. A reasonable rehabilitation program needs scientific research to avoid arbitrary conclusions.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Activities of Daily Living , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Exercise Therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
15.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(15): 818-824, 2020 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evaluating whether an infectious disease has reached a turning point is important for planning additional intervention efforts. This study aimed to analyze the changing patterns and the tempogeographic features of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic in China, to provide further evidence for real-time responses. METHODS: Daily data on COVID-19 cases between 31 December 2019 and 26 February 2020 were collected and analyzed for Hubei and non-Hubei regions in China. Observed trends for new and cumulative cases were analyzed through joinpoint regression analysis. Spatial analysis was applied to show the geographic distribution and changing patterns of the epidemic. RESULTS: By 26 February 2020, 78 630 confirmed COVID-19 cases had been reported in China. In Hubei, an increasing trend (slope = 221) was observed for new cases between 24 January and 7 February 2020, after which a decline commenced (slope = -868). However, as the diagnosis criteria changed, a sudden increase (slope = 5530) was observed on 12 February, which sharply decreased afterward (slope = -4898). In non-Hubei regions, the number of new cases increased from 20 January to 3 February and started to decline afterward (slope = -53). The spatial analysis identified Chongqing, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Changsha, Nanchang, Wenzhou, Shanghai, Xinyang, Jining, and Beijing as the hotspots outside of Hubei Province in China. CONCLUSIONS: The joinpoint regression analysis indicated that the epidemic might be under control in China, especially for regions outside of Hubei Province. Further improvement in the response strategies based on these new patterns is needed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Software , Spatio-Temporal Analysis
16.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e925047, 2020 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689085

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and compare these parameters in an elderly group with those in a younger group. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective, single-center observational study included 69 hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from a tertiary hospital in Wuhan, China, between January 14, 2020, and February 26, 2020. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data, as well as treatments, complications, and outcomes were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between elderly patients (aged ≥60 years) and younger patients (aged <60 years). Patients were followed until March 19, 2020. RESULTS Elderly patients had more complications than younger patients, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; 9/25, 36% vs. 5/44, 11.4%) and cardiac injury (7/25, 28% vs. 1/44, 2.3%), and they were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit (6/25, 24% vs. 2/44, 4.5%). As of March 19, 2020, 60/69 (87%) of the patients had been discharged, 6/69 (8.7%) had died, and 3/69 (4.3%) remained in the hospital. Of those who were discharged or died, the median duration of hospitalization was 13.5 days (interquartile range, 10-18 days). CONCLUSIONS Elderly patients with confirmed COVID-19 were more likely to develop ARDS and cardiac injury than younger patients and were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit. In addition to routine monitoring and respiratory support, cardiac monitoring and supportive care should be a focus in elderly patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Heart Diseases/etiology , Humans , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
17.
Postepy Biochem ; 66(2): 83-90, 2020 05 09.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689005

ABSTRACT

In December 2019 in Wuhan, China the first cases of previously unknown, coronaviral infection-induced pneumonia have been reported. The new virus SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) was named after SARS-CoV due to their similarities and the disease caused by the pathogen is COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019). On 11 March 2020 WHO (World Health Organization) defined the rapidly increasing number of incidents of COVID-19 as a pandemic. In this review we will present recent information about the SARS-CoV-2 focusing on the origin, clinical picture, diagnostic methods, structure, replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and potential pharmaceutical measures against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS Virus
18.
Indian J Med Microbiol ; 38(1): 87-93, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688925

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aims to provide scientific basis for rapid screening and early diagnosis of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) through analysing the clinical characteristics and early imaging/laboratory findings of the inpatients. Methods: Three hundred and three patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from the East Hospital of People's Hospital of Wuhan University (Wuhan, China) were selected and divided into four groups: youth (20-40 years, n = 64), middle-aged (41-60 years, n = 89), older (61-80 years, n = 118) and elderly (81-100 years, n = 32). The clinical characteristics and imaging/laboratory findings including chest computed tomography (CT), initial blood count, C-reactive protein [CRP]), procalcitonin (PCT) and serum total IgE were captured and analysed. Results: (1) The first symptoms of all age groups were primarily fever (76%), followed by cough (12%) and dyspnoea (5%). Beside fever, the most common initial symptom of elderly patients was fatigue (13%). (2) Fever was the most common clinical manifestation (80%), with moderate fever being the most common (40%), followed by low fever in patients above 40 years old and high fever in those under 40 years (35%). Cough was the second most common clinical manifestation and was most common (80%) in the middle-aged. Diarrhoea was more common in the middle-aged (21%) and the older (19%). Muscle ache was more common in the middle-aged (15%). Chest pain was more common in the youth (13%), and 13% of the youth had no symptoms. (3) The proportion of patients with comorbidities increased with age. (4) Seventy-one per cent of the patients had positive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results and 29% had positive chest CT scans before admission to the hospital. (5) Lesions in all lobes of the lung were observed as the main chest CT findings (76%). (6) Decrease in lymphocytes and increase in monocytes were common in the patients over 40 years old but rare in the youth. Eosinophils (50%), red blood cells (39%) and haemoglobin (40%) decreased in all age groups. (7) The proportion of patients with CRP and PCT elevation increased with age. (8) Thirty-nine per cent of the patients had elevated IgE, with the highest proportion in the old (49%). Conclusion: The clinical characteristics and imaging/laboratory findings of COVID-19 patients vary in different age groups. Personalised criteria should be formulated according to different age groups in the early screening and diagnosis stage.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Diagnostic Tests, Routine/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , China , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Early Diagnosis , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Mass Screening/methods , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Young Adult
19.
Ren Fail ; 42(1): 733-739, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688758

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) require specialized management. However, the current situation of CKD management is unclear during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We aimed to investigate the influence of the COVID-19 on kidney patients' follow-ups. METHODS: In April 2020, we included patients who underwent kidney biopsy from January 2017 to December 2019 in a referral center of China, and then initiated a survey via telephone on different aspects of follow-up during the COVID-19 pandemic. We collected and analyzed demographic data, diagnoses, follow-up conditions, and telemedicine experience. RESULTS: We reached 1190 CKD patients with confirmed kidney biopsies, and included 1164 patients for analysis after excluding those on dialysis. None of our patients have had COVID-19, although more than 50% of them were complicated with other comorbidities, and over 40% were currently using immunosuppressive treatments. Face-to-face clinic visits were interrupted in 836 (71.82%) participants. Medicine adjustments and routine laboratory examinations were delayed or made irregular in about 60% of patients. To continue their follow-ups, 255 (21.90%) patients utilized telemedicine, and about 80% of them were satisfied with the experience. The proportion of telemedicine users was significantly higher in patients with immunosuppressive treatments than those without (31.88% vs. 17.12%, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The risk of COVID-19 was mitigated in patients with CKD and other co-existing risk factors when proper protection was utilized. The routine medical care was disrupted during the pandemic, and telemedicine could be a reasonable alternative method.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/pathology , Adult , Biopsy, Needle , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Databases, Factual , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
J Infect ; 80(6): 639-645, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688316

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the characteristics and prognostic factors in the elderly patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Consecutive cases over 60 years old with COVID-19 in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from Jan 1 to Feb 6, 2020 were included. The primary outcomes were death and survival till March 5. Data of demographics, clinical features, comorbidities, laboratory tests and complications were collected and compared for different outcomes. Cox regression was performed for prognostic factors. RESULTS: 339 patients with COVID-19 (aged 71±8 years,173 females (51%)) were enrolled, including 80 (23.6%) critical, 159 severe (46.9%) and 100 moderate (29.5%) cases. Common comorbidities were hypertension (40.8%), diabetes (16.0%) and cardiovascular disease (15.7%). Common symptoms included fever (92.0%), cough (53.0%), dyspnea (40.8%) and fatigue (39.9%). Lymphocytopenia was a common laboratory finding (63.2%). Common complications included bacterial infection (42.8%), liver enzyme abnormalities (28.7%) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (21.0%). Till Mar 5, 2020, 91 cases were discharged (26.8%), 183 cases stayed in hospital (54.0%) and 65 cases (19.2%) were dead. Shorter length of stay was found for the dead compared with the survivors (5 (3-8) vs. 28 (26-29), P < 0.001). Symptoms of dyspnea (HR 2.35, P = 0.001), comorbidities including cardiovascular disease (HR 1.86, P = 0.031) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR 2.24, P = 0.023), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 29.33, P < 0.001) were strong predictors of death. And a high level of lymphocytes was predictive of better outcome (HR 0.10, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: High proportion of severe to critical cases and high fatality rate were observed in the elderly COVID-19 patients. Rapid disease progress was noted in the dead with a median survival time of 5 days after admission. Dyspnea, lymphocytopenia, comorbidities including cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and acute respiratory distress syndrome were predictive of poor outcome. Close monitoring and timely treatment should be performed for the elderly patients at high risk.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Prognosis , Survival Analysis
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL