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1.
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med ; 56(3): 335-338, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689752

ABSTRACT

Corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a new disease characterized by lung damage and involvement in multiple tissues and organs in the whole body. Some of the patients may have long-term impairment and dysfunctions, including pulmonary fibrosis, heart, liver, kidney, nerve and immune system. Rehabilitation has certain beneficial effect in the acute stage, and especially in the recovery stage, including improving respiratory function, exercise endurance, self-care in daily living activities, as well as psychological support, etc. Rehabilitation is not offside or absent. A reasonable rehabilitation program needs scientific research to avoid arbitrary conclusions.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Activities of Daily Living , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Exercise Therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
2.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e925047, 2020 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689085

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and compare these parameters in an elderly group with those in a younger group. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective, single-center observational study included 69 hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from a tertiary hospital in Wuhan, China, between January 14, 2020, and February 26, 2020. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data, as well as treatments, complications, and outcomes were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between elderly patients (aged ≥60 years) and younger patients (aged <60 years). Patients were followed until March 19, 2020. RESULTS Elderly patients had more complications than younger patients, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; 9/25, 36% vs. 5/44, 11.4%) and cardiac injury (7/25, 28% vs. 1/44, 2.3%), and they were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit (6/25, 24% vs. 2/44, 4.5%). As of March 19, 2020, 60/69 (87%) of the patients had been discharged, 6/69 (8.7%) had died, and 3/69 (4.3%) remained in the hospital. Of those who were discharged or died, the median duration of hospitalization was 13.5 days (interquartile range, 10-18 days). CONCLUSIONS Elderly patients with confirmed COVID-19 were more likely to develop ARDS and cardiac injury than younger patients and were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit. In addition to routine monitoring and respiratory support, cardiac monitoring and supportive care should be a focus in elderly patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Heart Diseases/etiology , Humans , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
3.
Postepy Biochem ; 66(2): 83-90, 2020 05 09.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689005

ABSTRACT

In December 2019 in Wuhan, China the first cases of previously unknown, coronaviral infection-induced pneumonia have been reported. The new virus SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) was named after SARS-CoV due to their similarities and the disease caused by the pathogen is COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019). On 11 March 2020 WHO (World Health Organization) defined the rapidly increasing number of incidents of COVID-19 as a pandemic. In this review we will present recent information about the SARS-CoV-2 focusing on the origin, clinical picture, diagnostic methods, structure, replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and potential pharmaceutical measures against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS Virus
4.
J Infect ; 80(6): 639-645, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688316

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the characteristics and prognostic factors in the elderly patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Consecutive cases over 60 years old with COVID-19 in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from Jan 1 to Feb 6, 2020 were included. The primary outcomes were death and survival till March 5. Data of demographics, clinical features, comorbidities, laboratory tests and complications were collected and compared for different outcomes. Cox regression was performed for prognostic factors. RESULTS: 339 patients with COVID-19 (aged 71±8 years,173 females (51%)) were enrolled, including 80 (23.6%) critical, 159 severe (46.9%) and 100 moderate (29.5%) cases. Common comorbidities were hypertension (40.8%), diabetes (16.0%) and cardiovascular disease (15.7%). Common symptoms included fever (92.0%), cough (53.0%), dyspnea (40.8%) and fatigue (39.9%). Lymphocytopenia was a common laboratory finding (63.2%). Common complications included bacterial infection (42.8%), liver enzyme abnormalities (28.7%) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (21.0%). Till Mar 5, 2020, 91 cases were discharged (26.8%), 183 cases stayed in hospital (54.0%) and 65 cases (19.2%) were dead. Shorter length of stay was found for the dead compared with the survivors (5 (3-8) vs. 28 (26-29), P < 0.001). Symptoms of dyspnea (HR 2.35, P = 0.001), comorbidities including cardiovascular disease (HR 1.86, P = 0.031) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR 2.24, P = 0.023), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 29.33, P < 0.001) were strong predictors of death. And a high level of lymphocytes was predictive of better outcome (HR 0.10, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: High proportion of severe to critical cases and high fatality rate were observed in the elderly COVID-19 patients. Rapid disease progress was noted in the dead with a median survival time of 5 days after admission. Dyspnea, lymphocytopenia, comorbidities including cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and acute respiratory distress syndrome were predictive of poor outcome. Close monitoring and timely treatment should be performed for the elderly patients at high risk.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Prognosis , Survival Analysis
5.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 20(6): 669-677, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688245

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the face of rapidly changing data, a range of case fatality ratio estimates for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been produced that differ substantially in magnitude. We aimed to provide robust estimates, accounting for censoring and ascertainment biases. METHODS: We collected individual-case data for patients who died from COVID-19 in Hubei, mainland China (reported by national and provincial health commissions to Feb 8, 2020), and for cases outside of mainland China (from government or ministry of health websites and media reports for 37 countries, as well as Hong Kong and Macau, until Feb 25, 2020). These individual-case data were used to estimate the time between onset of symptoms and outcome (death or discharge from hospital). We next obtained age-stratified estimates of the case fatality ratio by relating the aggregate distribution of cases to the observed cumulative deaths in China, assuming a constant attack rate by age and adjusting for demography and age-based and location-based under-ascertainment. We also estimated the case fatality ratio from individual line-list data on 1334 cases identified outside of mainland China. Using data on the prevalence of PCR-confirmed cases in international residents repatriated from China, we obtained age-stratified estimates of the infection fatality ratio. Furthermore, data on age-stratified severity in a subset of 3665 cases from China were used to estimate the proportion of infected individuals who are likely to require hospitalisation. FINDINGS: Using data on 24 deaths that occurred in mainland China and 165 recoveries outside of China, we estimated the mean duration from onset of symptoms to death to be 17·8 days (95% credible interval [CrI] 16·9-19·2) and to hospital discharge to be 24·7 days (22·9-28·1). In all laboratory confirmed and clinically diagnosed cases from mainland China (n=70 117), we estimated a crude case fatality ratio (adjusted for censoring) of 3·67% (95% CrI 3·56-3·80). However, after further adjusting for demography and under-ascertainment, we obtained a best estimate of the case fatality ratio in China of 1·38% (1·23-1·53), with substantially higher ratios in older age groups (0·32% [0·27-0·38] in those aged <60 years vs 6·4% [5·7-7·2] in those aged ≥60 years), up to 13·4% (11·2-15·9) in those aged 80 years or older. Estimates of case fatality ratio from international cases stratified by age were consistent with those from China (parametric estimate 1·4% [0·4-3·5] in those aged <60 years [n=360] and 4·5% [1·8-11·1] in those aged ≥60 years [n=151]). Our estimated overall infection fatality ratio for China was 0·66% (0·39-1·33), with an increasing profile with age. Similarly, estimates of the proportion of infected individuals likely to be hospitalised increased with age up to a maximum of 18·4% (11·0-37·6) in those aged 80 years or older. INTERPRETATION: These early estimates give an indication of the fatality ratio across the spectrum of COVID-19 disease and show a strong age gradient in risk of death. FUNDING: UK Medical Research Council.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Middle Aged , Models, Statistical , Young Adult
6.
JCI Insight ; 5(10)2020 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-687860

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDThe severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a novel viral pneumonia (COVID-19), which is rapidly spreading throughout the world. The positive result of nucleic acid test is a golden criterion to confirm SARS-CoV-2 infection, but the detection features remain unclear.METHODSWe performed a retrospective analysis in 5630 high-risk individuals receiving SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid tests in Wuhan, China, and investigated their characteristics and diagnosis rates.RESULTSThe overall diagnosis rate was 34.7% (1952/5630). Male (P = 0.025) and older populations (P = 2.525 × 10-39) were at significantly higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. People were generally susceptible, and most cases concentrated in people of 30-79 years. Furthermore, we investigated the association between diagnosis rate and the amount of testing in 501 subjects. Results revealed a 1.27-fold improvement (from 27.9% to 35.5%) of diagnosis rate from testing once to twice (P = 5.847 × 10-9) and a 1.43-fold improvement (from 27.9% to 39.9%) from testing once to 3 times (P = 7.797 × 10-14). More than 3 testing administrations was not helpful for further improvement. However, this improvement was not observed in subjects with pneumonia (P = 0.097).CONCLUSIONAll populations are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and male and older-aged populations are at significantly higher risk. Increasing the amount of testing could significantly improve diagnosis rates, except for subjects with pneumonia. It is recommended to test twice in those high-risk individuals whose results are negative the first time, and performing 3 tests is better, if possible.FUNDINGThis work was supported by National Mega Project on Major Infectious Disease Prevention (no. 2017ZX10103005-007) and National Key Research and Development Program of China (no. 2018YFE0204500).


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/analysis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors , Young Adult
7.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 102(5): 924-925, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-686952

ABSTRACT

This article describes similarities and differences in the response of governments and the international community to the current 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the 2014 West African Ebola epidemic. It expresses the opinion that the speed and scale of the response to COVID-19 are affected by the important role that China plays in the global economy. By contrast, insufficient and less timely action was initially undertaken in West African countries during the 2014 Ebola epidemic. It concludes by stating why preparedness for and response to all disease outbreaks, also in countries of lower economic importance, should become a priority in the global health agenda.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Disaster Planning , Ebolavirus , Global Burden of Disease/economics , Global Health , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Pneumonia, Viral , Africa, Western/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Global Health/economics , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/economics , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/transmission , Humans , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
9.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 549, 2020 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684717

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to report the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) in Zengdu District, Hubei Province, China. METHODS: Clinical data on COVID-19 inpatients in Zengdu Hospital from January 27 to March 11, 2020 were collected; this is a community hospital in an area surrounding Wuhan and supported by volunteer doctors. All hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were included in this study. The epidemiological findings, clinical features, laboratory findings, radiologic manifestations, and clinical outcomes of these patients were analyzed. The patients were followed up for clinical outcomes until March 22, 2020. Severe COVID-19 cases include severe and critical cases diagnosed according to the seventh edition of China's COVID-19 diagnostic guidelines. Severe and critical COVID-19 cases were diagnosed according to the seventh edition of China's COVID-19 diagnostic guidelines. RESULTS: All hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 276 (median age: 51.0 years), were enrolled, including 262 non-severe and 14 severe patients. The proportion of patients aged over 60 years was higher in the severe group (78.6%) than in the non-severe group (18.7%, p < 0.01). Approximately a quarter of the patients (24.6%) had at least one comorbidity, such as hypertension, diabetes, or cancer, and the proportion of patients with comorbidities was higher in the severe group (85.7%) than in the non-severe group (21.4%, p < 0.01). Common symptoms included fever (82.2% [227/276]) and cough (78.0% [218/276]). 38.4% (106/276) of the patients had a fever at the time of admission. Most patients (94.9% [204/276]) were cured and discharged; 3.6% (10/276) deteriorated to a critical condition and were transferred to another hospital. The median COVID-19 treatment duration and hospital stay were 14.0 and 18.0 days, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the COVID-19 patients in Zengdu had mild disease. Older patients with underlying diseases were at a higher risk of progression to severe disease. The length of hospital-stay and antiviral treatment duration for COVID-19 were slightly longer than those in Wuhan. This work will contribute toward an understanding of COVID-19 characteristics in the areas around the core COVID-19 outbreak region and serve as a reference for decision-making for epidemic prevention and control in similar areas.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cough/epidemiology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
10.
Circulation ; 142(2): 114-128, 2020 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684109

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), we performed a single institutional study to evaluate its prevalence, risk factors, prognosis, and potential thromboprophylaxis strategies in a large referral and treatment center. METHODS: We studied a total of 143 patients with COVID-19 from January 29, 2020 to February 29, 2020. Demographic and clinical data, laboratory data, including ultrasound scans of the lower extremities, and outcome variables were obtained, and comparisons were made between groups with and without DVT. RESULTS: Of the 143 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 (age 63±14 years, 74 [51.7%] men), 66 patients developed lower extremity DVT (46.1%: 23 [34.8%] with proximal DVT and 43 [65.2%] with distal DVT). Compared with patients who did not have DVT, patients with DVT were older and had a lower oxygenation index, a higher rate of cardiac injury, and worse prognosis, including an increased proportion of deaths (23 [34.8%] versus 9 [11.7%]; P=0.001) and a decreased proportion of patients discharged (32 [48.5%] versus 60 [77.9%]; P<0.001). Multivariant analysis showed an association only between CURB-65 (confusion status, urea, respiratory rate, and blood pressure) score 3 to 5 (odds ratio, 6.122; P=0.031), Padua prediction score ≥4 (odds ratio, 4.016; P=0.04), D-dimer >1.0 µg/mL (odds ratio, 5.818; P<0.014), and DVT in this cohort, respectively. The combination of a CURB-65 score 3 to 5, a Padua prediction score ≥4, and D-dimer >1.0 µg/mL has a sensitivity of 88.52% and a specificity of 61.43% for screening for DVT. In the subgroup of patients with a Padua prediction score ≥4 and whose ultrasound scans were performed >72 hours after admission, DVT was present in 18 (34.0%) patients in the subgroup receiving venous thromboembolism prophylaxis versus 35 (66.0%) patients in the nonprophylaxis group (P=0.010). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of DVT is high and is associated with adverse outcomes in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism may be protective in patients with a Padua protection score ≥4 after admission. Our data seem to suggest that COVID-19 is probably an additional risk factor for DVT in hospitalized patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Blood Pressure , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Lower Extremity/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Prevalence , Prognosis , Respiratory Rate , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome , Venous Thrombosis/complications , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology
11.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e926008, 2020 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680488

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND During the outbreak of COVID-19, health care workers in the radiology department frequently interact with suspected patients and face a higher risk of infection and sudden surges in workload. High anxiety levels seriously harm physical and mental health and affect work efficiency and patient safety. Therefore, it is critical to determine anxiety levels of health care workers and explore its risk factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale were used to evaluate the anxiety and resilience of 364 health care workers with high exposure risk from the radiology departments of 32 public hospitals in Sichuan Province, China. Multivariate linear regression was used to analyze factors related to anxiety. RESULTS The mean anxiety score was 44.28±8.93 and 23.4% of our study participants reported mild (n=63), moderate (n=19), or severe (n=3) anxiety. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age, job position, availability of protective materials, signs of suspected symptoms, and susceptibility to emotions and behaviors of people around them were identified as risk factors for anxiety, whereas psychological resilience was identified as a protective factor. CONCLUSIONS Our study suggests that the anxiety level of health care workers in the radiology department with a high exposure risk to COVID-19 was high in the early stage of the outbreak, although the majority remained within normal limits. Timely assessment and effective intervention measures can improve the mental health of these at-risk populations.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Exposure , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Radiology Department, Hospital , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Fear , Female , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Sampling Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Socioeconomic Factors , Stress, Psychological , Workload
12.
Int J Med Sci ; 17(12): 1773-1782, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680183

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is one of the major reasons for ventilation and intubation management of COVID-19 patients but there is no noninvasive imaging monitoring protocol for ARDS. In this study, we aimed to develop a noninvasive ARDS monitoring protocol based on traditional quantitative and radiomics approaches from chest CT. Methods: Patients diagnosed with COVID-19 from Jan 20, 2020 to Mar 31, 2020 were enrolled in this study. Quantitative and radiomics data were extracted from automatically segmented regions of interest (ROIs) of infection regions in the lungs. ARDS existence was measured by Pa02/Fi02 <300 in artery blood samples. Three different models were constructed by using the traditional quantitative imaging metrics, radiomics features and their combinations, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the effectiveness of the models. Decision curve analysis (DCA) was used to test the clinical value of the proposed model. Results: The proposed models were constructed using 352 CT images from 86 patients. The median age was 49, and the male proportion was 61.9%. The training dataset and the validation dataset were generated by randomly sampling the patients with a 2:1 ratio. Chi-squared test showed that there was no significant difference in baseline of the enrolled patients between the training and validation datasets. The areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of the traditional quantitative model, radiomics model and combined model in the validation dataset was 0.91, 0.91 and 0.94, respectively. Accordingly, the sensitivities were 0.55, 0.82 and 0.58, while the specificities were 0.97, 0.86 and 0.98. The DCA curve showed that when threshold probability for a doctor or patients is within a range of 0 to 0.83, the combined model adds more net benefit than "treat all" or "treat none" strategies, while the traditional quantitative model and radiomics model could add benefit in all threshold probability. Conclusions: It is feasible to monitor ARDS from CT images using radiomics or traditional quantitative analysis in COVID-19. The radiomics model seems to be the most practical one for possible clinical use. Multi-center validation with a larger number of samples is recommended in the future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Algorithms , Area Under Curve , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Datasets as Topic , Female , Humans , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , ROC Curve , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Sampling Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Translational Medical Research/methods , Workflow
13.
Environ Microbiol ; 22(7): 2445-2456, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-679961

ABSTRACT

In the absence of an efficient drug treatment or a vaccine, the control of the COVID-19 pandemic relies on classic infection control measures. Since these means are socially disruptive and come with substantial economic loss for societies, a better knowledge of the epidemiology of the new coronavirus epidemic is crucial to achieve control at a sustainable cost and within tolerable restrictions of civil rights.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Child , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Immunity, Herd , Masks , Models, Theoretical , Molecular Epidemiology/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Olfaction Disorders/virology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Public Health , Risk Factors , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Singapore , United States/epidemiology
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(29): e21334, 2020 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-676910

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in 2019 has become a global pandemic. It is not known whether the disease is associated with a higher risk of infection in pregnant women or whether intrauterine vertical transmission can occur. We report 2 cases of pregnant women diagnosed with COVID-19. PATIENT CONCERNS: In all of Yichang city from January 20, 2020, to April 9, 2020, only 2 pregnant women, who were in the late stage of pregnancy, were diagnosed with COVID-19; one patient was admitted for fever with limb asthenia, and the other patient was admitted for abnormal chest computed tomography results. DIAGNOSES: Both pregnant women were diagnosed with COVID-19. INTERVENTIONS: After the medical staff prepared for isolation and protection, the 2 pregnant women quickly underwent cesarean sections. A series of tests, such as laboratory, imaging, and SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid examinations, were performed on the 2 women with COVID-19 and their newborns. OUTCOMES: One of the 2 infected pregnant women had severe COVID-19, and the other had mild disease. Both babies were delivered by cesarean section. Both of the women with COVID-19 worsened 3 to 6 days after delivery. Chest computed tomography suggested that the lesions due to SARS-CoV-2 infection increased. These women began to exhibit fever or reduced blood oxygen saturation again. One of the 2 newborns was born prematurely, and the other was born at full term. Neither infant was infected with COVID-19, but both had increased prothrombin time and fibrinogen, lactate dehydrogenase, phosphocreatine kinase, and creatine kinase isoenzyme contents. LESSONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection was not found in the newborns born to the 2 pregnant women with COVID-19, but transient coagulation dysfunction and myocardial damage occurred in the 2 newborns. Effective management strategies for pregnant women with COVID-19 will help to control the outbreak of COVID-19 among pregnant women.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Adult , Asthenia/etiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Cesarean Section/methods , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Female , Fever/etiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn/blood , Infant, Newborn/metabolism , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Thorax/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(29): e20781, 2020 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-676380

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: No specific anti-virus drugs or vaccines have been available for the treatment of COVID-19. Integrative traditional Chinese and western medicine has been proposed as a therapeutic option with substantial applications in China. This protocol is proposed for a systematic review and meta-analysis that aims to evaluate the efficacy of integrative traditional Chinese and western medicine treatment on patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Ten databases including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CIHAHL, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Database (VIP), Wanfang database, China Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) and Chinese Biomedical Literature Service System (SinoMed) will be searched. All published randomized controlled trials, clinical controlled trials, case-control, and case series that meet the pre-specified eligibility criteria will be included. Primary outcome measures include mortality, clinical recovery rate, duration of fever, progression rate from mild or moderate to severe, improvement of symptoms, biomarkers of laboratory examination and changes in computed tomography. Secondary outcomes include dosage of hormonotherapy, incidence and severity of adverse events and quality of life. Study selection, data extraction and assessment of bias risk will be conducted by 2 reviewers independently. RevMan software (V.5.3.5) will be used to perform data synthesis. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis will be performed when necessary. The strength of evidence will be assessed by the GRADE system. RESULTS: This study will provide a well-reported and high-quality synthesis on the efficacy of integrative traditional Chinese and western medicine treatment on patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: This systematic review protocol will be helpful for providing evidence of whether integrative traditional Chinese and western medicine treatment is an effective therapeutic approach for patients with COVID-19. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is unnecessary as no individual patient or privacy data is collected. The results of this study will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed scientific journal and/or conference presentation. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42020167205.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Biomarkers/analysis , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Treatment Outcome
16.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1164, 2020 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) that first occurred in Wuhan, China, is currently spreading throughout China. The majority of infected patients either traveled to Wuhan or came into contact with an infected person from Wuhan. Investigating members of the public with a travel history to Wuhan became the primary focus of the Chinese government's epidemic prevention and control measures, but several instances of withheld histories were uncovered as localized clusters of infections broke out. This study investigated the public's willingness and beliefs associated with reporting travel history to high-risk epidemic regions, to provide effective suggestions and measures for encouraging travel reporting. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted online between February 12 and 19, 2020. Descriptive analysis, chi-squared test, and Fisher's exact test were used to identify socio-demographic factors and beliefs associated with reporting, as well as their impact on the willingness to report on travel history to high-risk epidemic regions. RESULTS: Of the 1344 respondents, 91 (6.77%) expressed an inclination to deliberately withhold travel history. Those who understood the benefits of reporting and the legal consequences for deliberately withholding information, showed greater willingness to report their history (P < 0.05); conversely, those who believed reporting would stigmatize them and feared being quarantined after reporting showed less willingness to report (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: As any incident of withheld history can have unpredictable outcomes, the proportion of people who deliberately withhold information deserves attention. Appropriate public risk communication and public advocacy strategies should be implemented to strengthen the understanding that reporting on travel history facilitates infection screening and prompt treatment, and to decrease the fear of potentially becoming quarantined after reporting. Additionally, social support and policies should be established, and measures should be taken to alleviate stigmatization and discrimination against potential patients and reporters of travel history. Reinforcing the legal accountability of withholding travel history and strengthening systematic community monitoring are the measures that China is currently taking to encourage reporting on travel history to high-risk epidemic regions. These non-pharmaceutical interventions are relevant for countries that are currently facing the spread of the epidemic and those at risk of its potential spread.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Epidemics , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Travel/statistics & numerical data , Adult , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Government , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine/psychology , Risk Assessment , Young Adult
17.
Postepy Biochem ; 66(2): 83-90, 2020 05 09.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671307

ABSTRACT

In December 2019 in Wuhan, China the first cases of previously unknown, coronaviral infection-induced pneumonia have been reported. The new virus SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) was named after SARS-CoV due to their similarities and the disease caused by the pathogen is COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019). On 11 March 2020 WHO (World Health Organization) defined the rapidly increasing number of incidents of COVID-19 as a pandemic. In this review we will present recent information about the SARS-CoV-2 focusing on the origin, clinical picture, diagnostic methods, structure, replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and potential pharmaceutical measures against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS Virus
18.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(7): e18831, 2020 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-669449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a type of pneumonia caused by a novel coronavirus that was discovered in 2019. As of May 6, 2020, 84,407 cases and 4643 deaths have been confirmed in China. The Chinese population has expressed great concern since the COVID-19 outbreak. Meanwhile, an average of 1 billion people per day are using the Baidu search engine to find COVID-19-related health information. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to analyze web search data volumes related to COVID-19 in China. METHODS: We conducted an infodemiological study to analyze web search data volumes related to COVID-19. Using Baidu Index data, we assessed the search frequencies of specific search terms in Baidu to describe the impact of COVID-19 on public health, psychology, behaviors, lifestyles, and social policies (from February 11, 2020, to March 17, 2020). RESULTS: The search frequency related to COVID-19 has increased significantly since February 11th. Our heat maps demonstrate that citizens in Wuhan, Hubei Province, express more concern about COVID-19 than citizens from other cities since the outbreak first occurred in Wuhan. Wuhan citizens frequently searched for content related to "medical help," "protective materials," and "pandemic progress." Web searches for "return to work" and "go back to school" have increased eight-fold compared to the previous month. Searches for content related to "closed community and remote office" have continued to rise, and searches for "remote office demand" have risen by 663% from the previous quarter. Employees who have returned to work have mainly engaged in the following web searches: "return to work and prevention measures," "return to work guarantee policy," and "time to return to work." Provinces with large, educated populations (eg, Henan, Hebei, and Shandong) have been focusing on "online education" whereas medium-sized cities have been paying more attention to "online medical care." CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that web search data may reflect changes in health literacy, social panic, and prevention and control policies in response to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Search Engine/statistics & numerical data , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Facilities and Services Utilization , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
19.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 26(7): 1470-1477, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-668858

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is the causative agent of the ongoing coronavirus disease pandemic. Initial estimates of the early dynamics of the outbreak in Wuhan, China, suggested a doubling time of the number of infected persons of 6-7 days and a basic reproductive number (R0) of 2.2-2.7. We collected extensive individual case reports across China and estimated key epidemiologic parameters, including the incubation period (4.2 days). We then designed 2 mathematical modeling approaches to infer the outbreak dynamics in Wuhan by using high-resolution domestic travel and infection data. Results show that the doubling time early in the epidemic in Wuhan was 2.3-3.3 days. Assuming a serial interval of 6-9 days, we calculated a median R0 value of 5.7 (95% CI 3.8-8.9). We further show that active surveillance, contact tracing, quarantine, and early strong social distancing efforts are needed to stop transmission of the virus.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Basic Reproduction Number , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Travel
20.
J Nurs Manag ; 28(5): 1002-1009, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-668308

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To investigate the work stress among Chinese nurses who are supporting Wuhan in fighting against Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and to explore the relevant influencing factors. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 epidemic has posed a major threat to public health. Nurses have always played an important role in infection prevention, infection control, isolation, containment and public health. However, available data on the work stress among these nurses are limited. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey. An online questionnaire was completed by 180 anti-epidemic nurses from Guangxi. Data collection tools, including the Chinese version of the Stress Overload Scale (SOS) and the Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), were used. Descriptive single factor correlation and multiple regression analyses were used in exploring the related influencing factors. RESULTS: The SOS (39.91 ± 12.92) and SAS (32.19 ± 7.56) scores of this nurse group were positively correlated (r = 0.676, p < .05). Multiple regression analysis showed that only children, working hours per week and anxiety were the main factors affecting nurse stress (p = .000, .048, .000, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Nurses who fight against COVID-19 were generally under pressure. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nurse leaders should pay attention to the work stress and the influencing factors of the nurses who are fighting against COVID-19 infection, and offer solutions to retain mental health among these nurses.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Epidemics/prevention & control , Nursing Staff/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Young Adult
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