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1.
Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi ; 60(11): 1158-1162, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099939

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the clinical characteristics of the neonates infected with SARS-CoV-2 during the Omicron outbreak in Shanghai 2022. Methods: In this retrospective case series study, all the 16 neonates with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron infection who were admitted to the neonatal unit in Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center from March 1st to May 31st, 2022 were enrolled. Their epidemiological history, clinical manifestations, nucleic acid cycle threshold (Ct) value and outcomes were analyzed. Based on maternal vaccination, they were divided into vaccinated group and unvaccinated group. Rank sum test and Chi-square test were used for the comparison between the groups. Results: Among the 16 neonates, 10 were male, and 6 were female. All the infants were full-term. The infection was confirmed at the age of 12.5 (8.0, 20.5) days. All the neonates had a history of exposure to infected family members, and thus horizontal transmission was the primary mode. Four infants were asymptomatic, 12 were symptomatic, and there were no severe or critical cases. The most common clinical manifestation was fever (11 cases), with the highest temperature of 38.1 (37.9, 38.3) ℃ and a course of 1-5 days. Other clinical manifestations included nasal obstruction (3 cases), runny nose (2 cases), cough (2 cases), poor feeding (2 cases), vomiting (1 case), and mild tachypnea (1 case). The complete blood counts of all neonates were within the normal range, and the C-reactive protein increased slightly in 1 infant. Chest imaging was performed in 2 infants, showing mild focal exudative changes. Nucleic acid turned negative (Ct value ≥35) within 7-15 days after diagnosis. All neonates fully recovered after supportive treatment, and the length of hospitalization was 13 (10, 14) days. In the telephone follow-up 2 weeks after discharge for all 16 cases, no infant showed reoccurrence of clinical manifestations or nucleic acid reactivation. Maternal vaccination was not significantly correlated with symptomatic infection or the persistence of positive nucleic acid result in neonates (all P>0.05). Conclusions: Horizontal transmission is the primary mode for neonatal SARS-CoV-2 Omicron infection. Neonatal infections are usually mild or asymptomatic, with good short-term outcomes. And their clinical manifestations and laboratory examinations are nonspecific.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nucleic Acids , Infant, Newborn , Male , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , China/epidemiology , Fever , Disease Outbreaks
2.
BMC Pulm Med ; 22(1): 156, 2022 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798412

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: China launched its new round of health care reform to develop primary care in 2009, establishing 954,390 primary care institutions that employed over 10 million staff by 2019. However, some studies have shown that the prevention and management of respiratory diseases is inadequate in these institutions. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of grassroots institutions throughout China between September and December 2020 based on the standardized Prevention and Treatment System and Capacity Building Project of Respiratory Diseases in primary care settings. The operation of the respiratory department in primary health care institutions was evaluated in terms of facilities, drugs, personnel and management of chronic diseases by means of questionnaires. Descriptive analyses were performed to calculate percentages and frequencies of key parameters. RESULTS: A total of 144 primary health care institutions were surveyed, including 51 in the east, 82 in the west, 9 in the central and 2 in the northeast. Approximately 60% of institutions had spirometers and pulse oximeters. The majority had short-acting bronchodilators, theophylline, systemic corticosteroids, antibiotics, and traditional Chinese medicine. More than half had at least one respiratory physician and operator for spirometry. Half of the institutions carried out screening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease within the jurisdiction. The institutions in the east were superior to those in the west regarding the equipment, common drugs, medical staff, and management of respiratory diseases. CONCLUSIONS: The study reveals that the overall operation of the respiratory department in primary care settings needs to be further strengthened. It is crucial to provide adequate essential equipment, medical professionals, and medicines for proper diagnosis and treatment of chronic respiratory diseases, as well as improving the management of diseases.


Subject(s)
Respiration Disorders , China/epidemiology , Chronic Disease , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Primary Health Care , Respiration Disorders/prevention & control
3.
Comput Math Methods Med ; 2022: 7828131, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098058

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the world's deadliest infectious disease killers today, and despite China's increasing efforts to prevent and control TB, the TB epidemic is still very serious. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, if reliable forecasts of TB epidemic trends can be made, they can help policymakers with early warning and contribute to the prevention and control of TB. In this study, we collected monthly reports of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in Guiyang, China, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2020, and monthly meteorological data for the same period, and used LASSO regression to screen four meteorological factors that had an influence on the monthly reports of PTB in Guiyang, including sunshine hours, relative humidity, average atmospheric pressure, and annual highest temperature, of which relative humidity (6-month lag) and average atmospheric pressure (7-month lag) have a lagging effect with the number of TB reports in Guiyang. Based on these data, we constructed ARIMA, Holt-Winters (additive and multiplicative), ARIMAX (with meteorological factors), LSTM, and multivariable LSTM (with meteorological factors). We found that the addition of meteorological factors significantly improved the performance of the time series prediction model, which, after comprehensive consideration, included the ARIMAX (1,1,1) (0,1,2)12 model with a lag of 7 months at the average atmospheric pressure, outperforms the other models in terms of both fit (RMSE = 37.570, MAPE = 10.164%, MAE = 28.511) and forecast sensitivity (RMSE = 20.724, MAPE = 6.901%, MAE = 17.306), so the ARIMAX (1,1,1) (0,1,2)12 model with a lag of 7 months can be used as a predictor tool for predicting the number of monthly reports of PTB in Guiyang, China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary , Tuberculosis , Humans , China/epidemiology , Incidence , Time Factors , Pandemics , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/epidemiology , Tuberculosis/epidemiology
4.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 41(9): 1011-1015, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096316

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether ambient air pollutants and meteorological variables are associated with daily COVID-19 incidence. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort from January 25 to February 29, 2020. SETTING: Cities of Wuhan, Xiaogan, and Huanggang, China. PATIENTS: The COVID-19 cases detected each day. METHODS: We collected daily data of COVID-19 incidence, 8 ambient air pollutants (particulate matter of ≤2.5 µm [PM2.5], particulate matter ≤10 µm [PM10], sulfur dioxide [SO2], carbon monoxide [CO], nitrogen dioxide [NO2], and maximum 8-h moving average concentrations for ozone [O3-8h]) and 3 meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, and wind) in China's 3 worst COVID-19-stricken cities during the study period. The multivariate Poisson regression was performed to understand their correlation. RESULTS: Daily COVID-19 incidence was positively associated with PM2.5 and humidity in all cities. Specifically, the relative risk (RR) of PM2.5 for daily COVID-19 incidences were 1.036 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.032-1.039) in Wuhan, 1.059 (95% CI, 1.046-1.072) in Xiaogan, and 1.144 (95% CI, 1.12-1.169) in Huanggang. The RR of humidity for daily COVID-19 incidence was consistently lower than that of PM2.5, and this difference ranged from 0.027 to 0.111. Moreover, PM10 and temperature also exhibited a notable correlation with daily COVID-19 incidence, but in a negative pattern The RR of PM10 for daily COVID-19 incidence ranged from 0.915 (95% CI, 0.896-0.934) to 0.961 (95% CI, 0.95-0.972, while that of temperature ranged from 0.738 (95% CI, 0.717-0.759) to 0.969 (95% CI, 0.966-0.973). CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that PM2.5 and humidity are substantially associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 and that PM10 and temperature are substantially associated with a decreased risk of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants/toxicity , Air Pollution/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Weather , Air Pollutants/analysis , Air Pollution/analysis , Air Pollution/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Poisson Distribution , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi ; 24(10): 1085-1091, 2022 Oct 15.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090828

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To study the clinical features and prognosis of children and their family members with family clusters of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron variant infection under the admission mode of parent-child ward. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on the medical data of 190 children and 190 family members with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infection who were admitted to Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital, the designated hospital for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), April 8 to May 10, 2022. RESULTS: Both the child and adult groups were mainly mild COVID-19, and the proportion of mild cases in the child group was higher than that in the adult group (P<0.05). Respiratory symptoms were the main clinical manifestations in both groups. Compared with the adult group, the child group had higher incidence rates of fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and wheezing (P<0.05) and lower incidence rates of nasal obstruction, runny nose, cough, dry throat, throat itching, and throat pain (P<0.05). Compared with the child group, the adult group had higher rates of use of Chinese patent drugs, traditional Chinese medicine decoction, recombinant interferon spray, cough-relieving and phlegm-eliminating drugs, and nirmatrelvir/ritonavir tablets (P<0.05). Compared with the adult group, the child group had a lower vaccination rate of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (30.5% vs 71.1%, P<0.001) and a shorter duration of positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid (P<0.05). The patients with mild COVID-19 had a shorter duration of positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid than those with common COVID-19 in both groups (P<0.05). The patients with underlying diseases had a longer duration of positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid than those without such diseases in both groups (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Both children and adults with family clusters of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infection manifest mainly mild COVID-19. Despite lower vaccination rate of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in children, they have rapid disease recovery, with a shorter duration of positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid than adults, under the admission mode of parent-child ward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nucleic Acids , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Cough , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , China/epidemiology , Family
10.
Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi ; 24(10): 1092-1097, 2022 Oct 15.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090827

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To study the clinical features of children infected with the Omicron variant of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). METHODS: The medical data of 19 children who were diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infection from January 28 to March 3, 2022 in Hangzhou were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Among the 19 children, there were 7 boys (37%) and 12 girls (63%), and their age ranged from 6 months to 16 years, with a median age of 2 years and 1 month. Most of these children were infants and young children (aged ≤3 years, accounting for 53%). Among these children, 11 (58%) were unvaccinated with SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and 8 (42%) were vaccinated with SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, and 3 children (16%) had a history of underlying diseases. All 19 children had a clear history of close contact with persons infected with SARS-CoV-2, and 10 children (53%) were involved in the cluster outbreak in a maternal and infant care center. In terms of clinical classification, 13 children (68%) had mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and 6 (32%) had common COVID-19, with no severe cases of COVID-19. The most common clinical symptoms were cough (100%) and fever (63%). The children with a normal peripheral white blood cell count accounted for 84%, and those with a normal lymphocyte count accounted for 68%. There were no significant abnormalities in platelet count, procalcitonin, liver function parameters (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase), and renal function parameters (creatinine and urea). Six children (32%) had obvious signs of pneumonia on chest CT. All 19 children were given symptomatic treatment, and 12 children (63%) were given aerosol inhalation of interferon α. All children were cured and discharged. CONCLUSIONS: Children infected with Omicron variant strains are more common in infants and young children, with mild symptoms and good prognosis. Most of the children have a history of close contact with persons infected with SARS-CoV-2, and epidemic prevention and control should be strengthened in places with many infants and children, such as maternal and infant care centers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Infant , Male , Female , Humans , Child, Preschool , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , China/epidemiology
11.
Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 56(10): 1356-1386, 2022 Oct 06.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090420

ABSTRACT

Influenza is an acute respiratory infectious disease caused by the influenza virus, which seriously affects human health. The influenza virus has frequent antigenic drifts that can facilitate escape from pre-existing population immunity and lead to the rapid spread and annual seasonal epidemics. Influenza outbreaks occur in crowded settings, such as schools, kindergartens, and nursing homes. Seasonal influenza epidemics can cause 3-5 million severe cases and 290 000-650 000 respiratory disease-related deaths worldwide every year. Pregnant women, infants, adults 60 years and older, and individuals with comorbidities or underlying medical conditions are at the highest risk of severe illness and death from influenza. Given the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, some provinces in southern China had a summer peak of influenza. SARS-CoV-2 may co-circulate with influenza and other respiratory viruses in the upcoming winter-spring influenza season. Annual influenza vaccination is an effective way to prevent influenza, reduce influenza-related severe illness and death, and reduce the harm caused by influenza-related diseases and the use of medical resources. The currently approved influenza vaccines in China include trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3), quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV4), and trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV3). IIV3 is produced as a split virus vaccine and subunit vaccine; IIV4 is produced as a split virus vaccine; and LAIV3 is a live, attenuated virus vaccine. Except for some jurisdictions in China, the influenza vaccine is a non-immunization program vaccine-voluntarily and self-paid. China CDC has issued 'Technical Guidelines for Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in China' every year from 2018 to 2021. Over the past year, new research evidence has been published at home and abroad. To better guide the prevention and control of influenza and vaccination in China, the National Immunization Advisory Committee (NIAC) Influenza Vaccination Technical Working Group updated and revised the 2021-2022 Technical Guidelines with the latest research progress into the 'Technical Guidelines for Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in China (2022-2023)'. The new version has updated five key areas: (1) new research evidence-especially research conducted in China-has been added, including new estimates of the burden of influenza disease, assessments of influenza vaccine effectiveness and safety, and analyses of the cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination; (2) policies and measures for influenza prevention and control that were issued by the government over the past year; (3) influenza vaccines approved for marketing in China this year; (4) composition of trivalent and quadrivalent influenza vaccines for the 2022-2023 northern hemisphere influenza season; and (5) recommendations for influenza vaccination during the 2022-2023 influenza season. The 2022-2023 Guidelines recommend that vaccination clinics provide influenza vaccination services to all people aged 6 months and above who are willing to be vaccinated and have no contraindications to the influenza vaccine. For adults ≥ 18 years, co-administration of COVID-19 and inactivated influenza vaccines in separate arms is acceptable regarding immunogenicity and reactogenicity. For people under 18 years old, there should be at least 14 days between influenza vaccination and COVID-19 vaccination. The Guidelines express no preference for influenza vaccine type or manufacturer-any approved, age-appropriate influenza vaccines can be used. To minimize harm from influenza and limit the impact on the effort to prevent and control COVID-19 in China, the Technical Guidelines recommend priority vaccination of the following high-risk groups during the upcoming 2022-2023 influenza season: (1) healthcare workers, including clinical doctors and nurses, public health professionals, and quarantine professionals; (2) volunteers and staff who provide services and support for large events; (3) people living in nursing homes or welfare homes and staff who take care of vulnerable, at-risk individuals; (4) people who work in high population density settings, including teachers and students in kindergartens and primary and secondary schools, and prisoners and prison staff; and (5) people at high risk of influenza, including adults ≥ 60 years of age, children 6-59 months of age, individuals with comorbidities or underlying medical conditions, family members and caregivers of infants under 6 months of age, and pregnant women. Children 6 months to 8 years of age who receive inactivated influenza vaccine for the first time should receive two doses, with an inter-dose interval of 4 or more weeks. Children who previously received the influenza vaccine and anyone 9 years or older need only one dose. LAIV is recommended only for a single dose regardless of the previous influenza vaccination. Vaccination should begin as soon as influenza vaccines become available and preferably should be completed before the onset of the local influenza season. Repeated influenza vaccination during a single influenza season is not recommended. Vaccination clinics should provide immunization services throughout the epidemic season. Pregnant women can receive inactivated influenza vaccine at any stage of pregnancy. These guidelines are intended for use by staff of CDCs, healthcare workers, maternity and child care institutions and immunization clinic staff members who work on influenza control and prevention. The guidelines will be updated periodically as new evidence becomes available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Orthomyxoviridae , Adult , Infant , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Adolescent , Child, Preschool , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Seasons , Pandemics , COVID-19 Vaccines , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , China/epidemiology , Vaccines, Attenuated , Vaccines, Combined , Vaccines, Inactivated
12.
Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 56(10): 1499-1504, 2022 Oct 06.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090419

ABSTRACT

Since April 2022, severe acute hepatitis of unknown origin in children has spread to 35 countries and regions around the world, and more than 1 010 cases have been reported. Since the severe acute hepatitis of unknown origin involves a wide range of areas and has a high rate, it is critical to identify the etiology and establish effective preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic measures as soon as possible. This study discusses the possible mechanisms and countermeasures of the severe acute hepatitis of unknown origin in children. It speculates that the occurrence of the recent severe acute hepatitis might be related to adenovirus, adeno-associated virus infection, and the COVID-19 epidemic, while the difference in HLA polymorphism among different races might be related to the fact that reported cases were more common in Europe and the United States. Based on the currently available evidence, it can be preliminarily judged that the risk of large-scale outbreak of severe acute hepatitis of unknown origin in children would be low in China, but the persistent awareness and vigilance of the etiology is still needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hepatitis , Child , Humans , United States , Disease Outbreaks , Hepatitis/epidemiology , China/epidemiology
13.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604742, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089974

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study aimed to examine the mediating effect of perceived isolation and the moderating effect of COVID-19 related concerns in the relationship between social disconnectedness and mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey of 11,682 Chinese residents were conducted during the COVID-19 outbreak. Conditional process analysis was performed to test the mediating effect of perceived isolation and the moderating effect of COVID-19 related concerns. Results: Social disconnectedness was positively related to mental health problems, and perceived isolation significantly mediated their relationship. COVID-19 related concerns exacerbated the direct link between social disconnectedness and mental health problems as well as the indirect link via perceived isolation. Conclusion: Social disconnectedness was a key predictor of mental health problems during the COVID-19 outbreak. The direct and indirect effects of social disconnectedness on mental health problems were stronger for respondents who had more COVID-19 related concerns. Understanding the underlying mechanisms by which social disconnectedness is related to mental health problems has important practical implications for the prevention of mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
14.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 659, 2022 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089177

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination coverage and the influential factors of vaccination among patients with mental disorders, we conducted a cross-sectional study in China. METHOD: The anonymous questionnaires including demographic data, vaccination status, intention to be vaccinated and its reasons were collected in the Second Xiangya Hospital, one of the biggest four psychiatric centers in China. Mental health of these participants were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items (GAD-7). The influential factors associated with vaccination status were analyzed by Fisher exact tests and binary logistical analysis. RESULT: 1328 patients and 922 family members completed the survey. The vaccination rate of patients included was 69.4%, whereas 85.5% patients were willing to be vaccinated. Being hospitalized (aOR 0.41, 95% CI:0.27-0.60), suffering from schizophrenia (aOR 0.38, 95% CI: 0.19-0.75) and secondary school educational background (aOR 0.58, 95% CI: 0.37-0.93) were significantly associated with less likelihood to get vaccinated. Uptaking vaccines could reduce depressive (aOR 0.63, 95% CI: 0.41-0.98) or anxious symptoms (aOR 0.40, 95% CI: 0.25-0.63) in these patients for a short period. CONCLUSION: Further COVID-19 immunization programme should prioritize hospitalized psychiatric patients and schizophrenic patients since their demands for vaccination had been partly ignored during the current inoculation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics , Vaccination Coverage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , China/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology
15.
Comput Intell Neurosci ; 2022: 8491628, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083052

ABSTRACT

In order to explore the spatial and temporal distribution characteristics of COVID-19 in Chongqing from January 22 to February 25, 2010, and provide a series of suggestions for scientific prevention and control of epidemic situation, we will mainly analyze the epidemic situation data of Chongqing Municipal Health Committee members and improve the descriptive analysis. Regional distribution and spatiotemporal scans were analyzed for COVID-19 outbreaks using ArcGIS10.2 and SaTScan9. 5 software. After the analysis, a total of 576 novel coronavirus pneumonia patients were confirmed in Chongqing. The incidence trend increased rapidly from January 22 to January 31, then decreased gradually, and there were no new cases until February 25. The purely spatial scanning results were consistent with spatiotemporal scanning, and a first-level accumulation area was detected by spatiotemporal scanning in the east and northeast of Chongqing from January 22 to February 10. From January 22 to February 25, 2020,COVID-19 occurred in the eastern and northeast regions of Chongqing. It is recommended to strengthen the detection of cluster areas to prevent another outbreak of COVID-19 risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cluster Analysis , Humans , Incidence , Spatio-Temporal Analysis
16.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(19): 7305-7312, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081435

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease worldwide. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, many patients with acne complained of worsening symptoms. This investigation was designed to survey the impact of COVID-19 regulations on acne and guide patients with acne on symptom management during the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From April 7th to April 21st, 2020, an anonymous, self-completed, web-based questionnaire was distributed to patients previously diagnosed with acne (via the Chinese internet medical software). Information collected included patients' mask-wearing routines and behavioral factors including dietary habits, sleep habits, facial hygiene, and make-up use habits. RESULTS: 508 qualified questionnaire responses were collected. During the COVID-19 outbreak in China, there was an overall worsening of patients' acne symptoms (152, 29.9%). Behaviors including intake of sweets (34.9% vs. 16.0%, p<0.01), dairy consumption (32.9% vs. 23.3%, p<0.05), greasy (19.1% vs. 11.2%, p<0.05) and spicy food intake (30.3% vs. 14.3%, p<0.01) and mask-wearing frequency (>28 hours per week) (25.0% vs. 15.3%, p<0.05) presented a statistically significant difference between the acne aggravated and non-aggravated groups. Longtime mask-wearing (>28 hours per week), rather than the mask type, was significantly associated with acne symptom deterioration during the COVID-19 outbreak (odds ratio [OR]: 2.164; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.232-3.801). CONCLUSIONS: Besides the well-known risk factors, such as sweets intake, dairy consumption, and greasy and spicy food intake, wearing masks appears to trigger or aggravate acne during the COVID-19 pandemic. Limiting overall mask-wearing time may help to manage acne.


Subject(s)
Acne Vulgaris , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Acne Vulgaris/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Internet , Masks
17.
Front Public Health ; 10: 971525, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080292

ABSTRACT

Background: With the popularization of the Internet and medical knowledge, more and more people are learning about allergic rhinitis (AR) on the Internet. Objective: This study aims to analyze the epidemiological characteristics and online public attention to AR in Wuhan, China, utilizing the most popular search engine in mainland China and meteorological data of Wuhan. Methods: To study the Internet attention and epidemiological characteristics of AR in Wuhan, the search volume (SV) of "Allergic Rhinitis" in Mandarin and AR-related search terms from 1 January 2014 through 31 December 2021 were recorded. For user interest, the search and demand data were collected and analyzed. Results: The yearly average Baidu SV of AR in both Wuhan and China increased year by year but began to decline gradually after the COVID-19 pandemic. Baidu SV of AR in Wuhan exhibited significant seasonal variation, with the first peak was from March to May and the second peak occurring between September and October. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate positive correlation between the monthly average SV of "Allergic Rhinitis" and "Mites" and "Mites + Pollen Allergy" in Wuhan, a weak positive correlation between the monthly average SV of "Allergic Rhinitis" and "Pollen Allergy," and a positive correlation between monthly SV of "Allergic Rhinitis" and the meteorological index of pollen allergy (MIPA). Conclusion: The attention given to the topic on the internet, as measured by the search volume, was reflective of the situation in Wuhan, China. It has the potential to predict the epidemiological characteristics of AR and help medical professionals more effectively plan seasonal AR health education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal , Rhinitis, Allergic , Rhinitis , Humans , Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal/epidemiology , Pandemics , Infodemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Rhinitis, Allergic/epidemiology , China/epidemiology
18.
Front Public Health ; 10: 952739, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080287

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has triggered multiple global healthcare system crises. Apart from the pandemic itself, the travel restriction and social distance policy for the purpose of epidemic control has cast a shadow on the management of cancer survivors. Cancer survivors suffered a double blow from both the epidemic and cancer. To deal with the challenge, we explored a new Internet-based patient management model. This model has overcome the limitation of time and space and thus can help oncologists to provide remote multidisciplinary healthcare services for cancer survivors. These patients can get high-quality cancer management from multidisciplinary experts without too much transportation. This model has been applied in patients with genitourinary cancers and proved to be effective and efficient. Our study demonstrated that more patients benefited from this model during the pandemic of COVID-19, especially in those affected heavily by COVID-19. These results suggested that it can also give insight into the management of other cancer survivors in China. Given the long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we would like to introduce our new model of healthcare service and the application of Internet-based multidisciplinary management to our global peers and medical industries to help their cancer survivors who are delayed in treatment due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Urogenital Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Urogenital Neoplasms/therapy , Urogenital Neoplasms/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , China/epidemiology , Internet
19.
Front Public Health ; 10: 938156, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080286

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 has dramatically impacted people's health, especially mental health. This study aimed to compare the psychological status of pregnant women before and after the COVID-19 outbreak. Methods: Participants were recruited (from September 29, 2019, to November 5, 2020) and screened by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7). The study participants were categorized into three groups based on two turning-points: January 23, 2020, when China initiated a locked-down strategy, and May 11, 2020, when Shanghai started to ease the COVID-19 measures. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with depression and anxiety in pregnant women. We used enter method for variable selection; only variables with P <0.10 were included in the final model. Results: We recruited 478 pregnant women. After the outbreak, the depression rate (PHQ-9 ≥ 5) increased by 12.3% (from 35.4 to 47.7%), and the anxiety rate (GAD-7 ≥ 5) was stable (13.3 vs. 16.2%). The multivariable logistic regression results further confirmed that the odds of depression in pregnant women increased 81% after the outbreak (aOR = 1.81, 95%CI: 1.16-2.84). However, the median depression scale score was still statistically higher after the pandemic situation was stable (5.0 vs. 4.0) compared to the outbreak period. Conclusion: The depression rate increased among pregnant women after the outbreak and was not recovered after the ease of COVID-19 measures in Shanghai. Health institutes should pay attention to the long-term influence of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pregnant Women/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , China/epidemiology
20.
Lancet ; 395(10227): 871-877, 2020 03 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076860

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic has spread from China to 25 countries. Local cycles of transmission have already occurred in 12 countries after case importation. In Africa, Egypt has so far confirmed one case. The management and control of COVID-19 importations heavily rely on a country's health capacity. Here we evaluate the preparedness and vulnerability of African countries against their risk of importation of COVID-19. METHODS: We used data on the volume of air travel departing from airports in the infected provinces in China and directed to Africa to estimate the risk of importation per country. We determined the country's capacity to detect and respond to cases with two indicators: preparedness, using the WHO International Health Regulations Monitoring and Evaluation Framework; and vulnerability, using the Infectious Disease Vulnerability Index. Countries were clustered according to the Chinese regions contributing most to their risk. FINDINGS: Countries with the highest importation risk (ie, Egypt, Algeria, and South Africa) have moderate to high capacity to respond to outbreaks. Countries at moderate risk (ie, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Sudan, Angola, Tanzania, Ghana, and Kenya) have variable capacity and high vulnerability. We identified three clusters of countries that share the same exposure to the risk originating from the provinces of Guangdong, Fujian, and the city of Beijing, respectively. INTERPRETATION: Many countries in Africa are stepping up their preparedness to detect and cope with COVID-19 importations. Resources, intensified surveillance, and capacity building should be urgently prioritised in countries with moderate risk that might be ill-prepared to detect imported cases and to limit onward transmission. FUNDING: EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation Horizon 2020, Agence Nationale de la Recherche.


Subject(s)
Civil Defense , Coronavirus Infections , Epidemics/prevention & control , Health Resources , Models, Theoretical , Pneumonia, Viral , Population Surveillance , Vulnerable Populations , Africa/epidemiology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Health Planning , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Risk Assessment , Travel
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