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1.
Am J Public Health ; 112(7): 985-989, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865380

ABSTRACT

The Baltimore City Health Department (Baltimore, MD) promoted IWantTheKit for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and HIV testing to city residents and clinic patients when COVID-19 restricted in-person clinic services. From April to October 2020, monthly online IWantTheKit orders increased by 645%. A high prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhea was detected, and 96% of users who tested positive for chlamydia and gonorrhea were successfully contacted for treatment. Uptake by Baltimore City Health Department priority populations and excellent treatment linkage demonstrated how a public health-academic partnership successfully addressed a service gap during the pandemic. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(7):985-989. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.306835).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chlamydia Infections , Chlamydia , Gonorrhea , HIV Infections , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chlamydia Infections/diagnosis , Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology , Gonorrhea/diagnosis , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans
2.
APMIS ; 130(1): 34-42, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511283

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged the societies and health care systems globally, and resulted in many social and physical distancing restrictions to limit the spread of SARS-CoV-2. These restrictions have also likely affected the frequency of intimate contacts and the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Compared to most other countries, Sweden especially in Spring-Autumn 2020 pursued mainly milder voluntary, that is, not mandatory enforced by laws, recommended restrictions and the impacts of these on society and spread of STIs remain largely unknown. We describe the potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the national and regional incidence, epidemiology and diagnostic testing of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in Sweden in 2020. Compared to 2019, we found a significant decrease in incidence of chlamydia (-4.5%) and gonorrhoea (-17.5%), and in diagnostic testing (-10.5% for chlamydia, -9.4% for gonorrhoea) in 2020. However, the decrease in chlamydia incidence, which has mainly been decreasing in the last 10 years, was not significant when compared with the average incidence in 2017-2019. The largest decrease in national incidence of both infections was observed among young and heterosexual patients, however, some Swedish regions showed an increased incidence, particularly of chlamydia. Increased "internet-based self-sampling" testing approach partly compensated for a decreased attendance at STI clinics. Studies, including sexual behaviour, prevention, reasons for attending STI health care, STIs in different anatomical sites and management of STIs, are required to elucidate the impact of COVID-19-associated social and physical distancing restrictions on sexual activity and the incidence and epidemiology of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in Sweden.


Subject(s)
Chlamydia Infections/diagnosis , Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology , Gonorrhea/diagnosis , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Chlamydia , Chlamydia trachomatis , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Humans , Incidence , Neisseria gonorrhoeae , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sweden/epidemiology
3.
J Infect Dis ; 224(5): 798-803, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270740

ABSTRACT

Early in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis, a statewide executive order (PAUSE) severely restricted the movement of New Yorkers from 23 March to 7 June 2020. We used New York City surveillance data for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis to describe trends in diagnosis and reporting surrounding PAUSE. During PAUSE, the volume of positive HIV/sexually transmitted infection tests, and diagnoses of HIV, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis declined substantially, reaching a nadir in April before rebounding. Some shifts in characteristics of reported cases were identified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Chlamydia , Chlamydia Infections/diagnosis , Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology , Female , Gonorrhea/diagnosis , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/virology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Public Health Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis , Syphilis/diagnosis , Syphilis/epidemiology , Young Adult
4.
Am J Prev Med ; 61(3): 386-393, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233352

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study evaluates the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on testing for common sexually transmitted infections. Specifically, changes are measured in chlamydia and gonorrhea testing and case detection among patients aged 14-49 years during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: U.S. chlamydia and gonorrhea testing and positivity were analyzed on the basis of >18.6 million tests (13.6 million tests for female patients and 4.7 million tests for male patients) performed by a national reference clinical laboratory from January 2019 through June 2020. RESULTS: Chlamydia and gonorrhea testing reached a nadir in early April 2020, with decreases (relative to the baseline level) of 59% for female patients and 63% for male patients. Declines in testing were strongly associated with increases in weekly positivity rates for chlamydia (R2=0.96) and gonorrhea (R2=0.85). From March 2020 through June 2020, an expected 27,659 (26.4%) chlamydia and 5,577 (16.5%) gonorrhea cases were potentially missed. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted routine sexually transmitted infection services, suggesting an increase in syndromic sexually transmitted infection testing and missed asymptomatic cases. Follow-up analyses will be needed to assess the long-term implications of missed screening opportunities. These findings should serve as a warning for the potential sexual and reproductive health implications that can be expected from the overall decline in testing and potential missed cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chlamydia Infections , Chlamydia , Gonorrhea , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Chlamydia Infections/diagnosis , Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology , Female , Gonorrhea/diagnosis , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Mass Screening , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
5.
Viruses ; 13(4)2021 04 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167765

ABSTRACT

Cats are susceptible to infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Whilst a number of studies have been performed worldwide on owned cats, limited data are available on stray, colony or shelter cats. We investigated SARS-CoV-2 infection in a stray cat population before and during human outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 in cities in the Lombardy region in northern Italy, a high endemic region for SARS-CoV-2, using serological and molecular methods. A cohort of different samples were collected from 241 cats, including frozen archived serum samples from 136 cats collected before the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and serum, pharyngeal and rectal swab samples from 105 cats collected during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. All pre-pandemic samples tested seronegative for antibodies against the nucleocapsid of SARS-CoV-2 using indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test, while one serum sample collected during the pandemic was seropositive. No serological cross-reactivity was detected between SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and antibodies against feline enteric (FECV) and infectious peritonitis coronavirus (FIPC), Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), Feline Calicivirus (FCV), Feline Herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1), Feline Parvovirus (FPV), Leishmania infantum, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Rickettsia spp., Toxoplasma gondii or Chlamydophila felis. No pharyngeal or rectal swab tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA on real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR). Our data show that SARS-CoV-2 did infect stray cats in Lombardy during the COVID-19 pandemic, but with lower prevalence than found in owned cats. This should alleviate public concerns about stray cats acting as SARS-CoV-2 carriers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Anaplasma phagocytophilum , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Caliciviridae Infections/epidemiology , Calicivirus, Feline/immunology , Cats , Chlamydia , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Feline Panleukopenia/epidemiology , Feline Panleukopenia Virus/immunology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Leishmania infantum , Male , Prevalence , Rickettsia , SARS-CoV-2
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