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1.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266337, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779766

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 has resulted in an urgent need for identifying potential therapeutic drugs. In the first half of 2020 tropic antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine (CQ) or hydroxochloroquine (HCQ) were the focus of tremendous public attention. In the initial periods of the pandemic, many scientific results pointed out that CQ/HCQ could be very effective for patients with severe COVID. While CQ and HCQ have successfully been used against several diseases (such as malaria, autoimmune disease and rheumatic illnesses); long term use of these agents are associated with serious adverse effects (i.e. inducing acute kidney injury, among many others) due to their role in blocking autophagy-dependent self-degradation. Recent experimental and clinical trial data also confirmed that there is no sufficient evidence about the efficient usage of CQ/HCQ against COVID-19. By using systems biology techniques, here we show that the cellular effect of CQ/HCQ on autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress or following SARS-CoV-2 infection results in upregulation of ER stress. By presenting a simple mathematical model, we claim that although CQ/HCQ might be able to ameliorate virus infection, the permanent inhibition of autophagy by CQ/HCQ has serious negative effects on the cell. Since CQ/HCQ promotes apoptotic cell death, here we confirm that addition of CQ/HCQ cannot be really effective even in severe cases. Only a transient treatment seemed to be able to avoid apoptotic cell death, but this type of therapy could not limit virus replication in the infected host. The presented theoretical analysis clearly points out the utility and applicability of systems biology modelling to test the cellular effect of a drug targeting key major processes, such as autophagy and apoptosis. Applying these approaches could decrease the cost of pre-clinical studies and facilitate the selection of promising clinical trials in a timely fashion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Autophagy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Systems Biology
2.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687050

ABSTRACT

Despite the development of specific therapies against severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the continuous investigation of the mechanism of action of clinically approved drugs could provide new information on the druggable steps of virus-host interaction. For example, chloroquine (CQ)/hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) lacks in vitro activity against SARS-CoV-2 in TMPRSS2-expressing cells, such as human pneumocyte cell line Calu-3, and likewise, failed to show clinical benefit in the Solidarity and Recovery clinical trials. Another antimalarial drug, mefloquine, which is not a 4-aminoquinoline like CQ/HCQ, has emerged as a potential anti-SARS-CoV-2 antiviral in vitro and has also been previously repurposed for respiratory diseases. Here, we investigated the anti-SARS-CoV-2 mechanism of action of mefloquine in cells relevant for the physiopathology of COVID-19, such as Calu-3 cells (that recapitulate type II pneumocytes) and monocytes. Molecular pathways modulated by mefloquine were assessed by differential expression analysis, and confirmed by biological assays. A PBPK model was developed to assess mefloquine's optimal doses for achieving therapeutic concentrations. Mefloquine inhibited SARS-CoV-2 replication in Calu-3, with an EC50 of 1.2 µM and EC90 of 5.3 µM. It reduced SARS-CoV-2 RNA levels in monocytes and prevented virus-induced enhancement of IL-6 and TNF-α. Mefloquine reduced SARS-CoV-2 entry and synergized with Remdesivir. Mefloquine's pharmacological parameters are consistent with its plasma exposure in humans and its tissue-to-plasma predicted coefficient points suggesting that mefloquine may accumulate in the lungs. Altogether, our data indicate that mefloquine's chemical structure could represent an orally available host-acting agent to inhibit virus entry.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Mefloquine/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line , Drug Repositioning/methods , Humans , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Virus Internalization/drug effects
3.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 277-283, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585239

ABSTRACT

The novel SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant (B.1.1.529), first found in early November 2021, has sparked considerable global concern and it has >50 mutations, many of which are known to affect transmissibility or cause immune escape. In this study, we sought to investigate the virological characteristics of the Omicron variant and compared it with the Delta variant which has dominated the world since mid-2021. Omicron variant replicated more slowly than the Delta variant in transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2)-overexpressing VeroE6 (VeroE6/TMPRSS2) cells. Notably, the Delta variant replicated well in Calu3 cell line which has robust TMPRSS2 expression, while the Omicron variant replicated poorly in this cell line. Competition assay showed that Delta variant outcompeted Omicron variant in VeroE6/TMPRSS2 and Calu3 cells. To confirm the difference in entry pathway between the Omicron and Delta variants, we assessed the antiviral effect of bafilomycin A1, chloroquine (inhibiting endocytic pathway), and camostat (inhibiting TMPRSS2 pathway). Camostat potently inhibited the Delta variant but not the Omicron variant, while bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine could inhibit both Omicron and Delta variants. Moreover, the Omicron variant also showed weaker cell-cell fusion activity when compared with Delta variant in VeroE6/TMPRSS2 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that Omicron variant infection is not enhanced by TMPRSS2 but is largely mediated via the endocytic pathway. The difference in entry pathway between Omicron and Delta variants may have an implication on the clinical manifestations or disease severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication , Animals , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Endocytosis/drug effects , Esters/pharmacology , Guanidines/pharmacology , Humans , Immune Evasion , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Macrolides/pharmacology , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells , Virus Cultivation , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Whole Genome Sequencing
4.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(Special Issue): 1247-1250, 2021 Aug.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524922

ABSTRACT

Interest in chloroquine, and its analog with a more favorable safety profile - hydroxychloroquine, in 2020 is certainly associated with the outbreak of a new coronavirus infection, SARS-CoV-2. The high pathogenicity and lack of specific immunity in the population caused the rapid spread of infection with an extraordinary increase in the burden on the health systems of many countries. In such conditions, it was necessary to quickly find and implement effective methods of treatment and prevention. One of the most promising candidates for this role was hydroxychloroquine, as a multi-purpose drug with a well-studied safety profile and a rich history of use. The article describes some historical stages of the study of chloroquine and its derivatives starting from the 19th century and ending in 2020. The experience of its use for the treatment of diseases such as malaria, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, bronchial asthma, photosensitivity and skin porphyria was reviewed. Separately, some historical aspects of its use for the treatment of viral and oncological diseases were considered. The bibliometric method used in this scientific work clearly demonstrates the dynamics of the changing interest of the scientific community in chloroquine and its derivatives. Chloroquine and its derivatives can definitely be attributed to «pharmaceutical centenarians¼ with an intense life that continues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Medicine , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bibliometrics , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 913: 174632, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509762

ABSTRACT

Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have been proposed recently as therapy for SARS-CoV-2-infected patients, but during 3 months of extensive use concerns were raised related to their clinical effectiveness and arrhythmogenic risk. Therefore, we estimated for these compounds several proarrhythmogenic risk predictors according to the Comprehensive in vitro Proarrhythmia Assay (CiPA) paradigm. Experiments were performed with either CytoPatch™2 automated or manual patch-clamp setups on HEK293T cells stably or transiently transfected with hERG1, hNav1.5, hKir2.1, hKv7.1+hMinK, and on Pluricyte® cardiomyocytes (Ncardia), using physiological solutions. Dose-response plots of hERG1 inhibition fitted with Hill functions yielded IC50 values in the low micromolar range for both compounds. We found hyperpolarizing shifts of tens of mV, larger for chloroquine, in the voltage-dependent activation but not inactivation, as well as a voltage-dependent block of hERG current, larger at positive potentials. We also found inhibitory effects on peak and late INa and on IK1, with IC50 of tens of µM and larger for chloroquine. The two compounds, tested on Pluricyte® cardiomyocytes using the ß-escin-perforated method, inhibited IKr, ICaL, INa peak, but had no effect on If. In current-clamp they caused action potential prolongation. Our data and those from literature for Ito were used to compute proarrhythmogenic risk predictors Bnet (Mistry HB, 2018) and Qnet (Dutta S et al., 2017), with hERG1 blocking/unblocking rates estimated from time constants of fractional block. Although the two antimalarials are successfully used in autoimmune diseases, and chloroquine may be effective in atrial fibrillation, assays place these drugs in the intermediate proarrhythmogenic risk group.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/chemically induced , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Action Potentials/drug effects , Biological Assay , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computer Simulation , Correlation of Data , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , ERG1 Potassium Channel/agonists , ERG1 Potassium Channel/antagonists & inhibitors , ERG1 Potassium Channel/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , KCNQ1 Potassium Channel/antagonists & inhibitors , KCNQ1 Potassium Channel/metabolism , Kinetics , Myocytes, Cardiac/drug effects , NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel/metabolism , Patch-Clamp Techniques , Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying/antagonists & inhibitors , Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying/metabolism , Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated/metabolism , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
6.
J Sep Sci ; 45(2): 456-467, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499288

ABSTRACT

Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have been studied since the early clinical treatment of SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Considering these two chiral drugs are currently in use as the racemate, high-expression angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 cell membrane chromatography was established for investigating the differences of two paired enantiomers binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor. Molecular docking assay and detection of SARS-CoV-2 spike pseudotyped virus entry into angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-HEK293T cells were also conducted for further investigation. Results showed that each single enantiomer could bind well to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, but there were differences between the paired enantiomers and corresponding racemate in frontal analysis. R-Chloroquine showed better angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor binding ability compared to S-chloroquine/chloroquine (racemate). S-Hydroxychloroquine showed better angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor binding ability than R-hydroxychloroquine/hydroxychloroquine. Moreover, each single enantiomer was proved effective compared with the control group; compared with S-chloroquine or the racemate, R-chloroquine showed better inhibitory effects at the same concentration. As for hydroxychloroquine, R-hydroxychloroquine showed better inhibitory effects than S-hydroxychloroquine, but it slightly worse than the racemate. In conclusion, R-chloroquine showed better angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor binding ability and inhibitory effects compared to S-chloroquine/chloroquine (racemate). S-Hydroxychloroquine showed better angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor binding ability than R-hydroxychloroquine/hydroxychloroquine (racemate), while the effect of preventing SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus from entering cells was weaker than R-hydroxychloroquine/hydroxychloroquine (racemate).


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/drug effects , Chloroquine/chemistry , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methods , Hydroxychloroquine/chemistry , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cell Membrane/chemistry , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/virology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Molecular Docking Simulation , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Solvents , Stereoisomerism , Virus Internalization
7.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther ; 379(1): 96-107, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483965

ABSTRACT

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, drug repurposing has been highlighted for rapid introduction of therapeutics. Proposed drugs with activity against SARS-CoV-2 include compounds with positive charges at physiologic pH, making them potential targets for the organic cation secretory transporters of kidney and liver, i.e., the basolateral organic cation transporters, OCT1 and OCT2; and the apical multidrug and toxin extruders, MATE1 and MATE2-K. We selected several compounds proposed to have in vitro activity against SARS-CoV-2 (chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, quinacrine, tilorone, pyronaridine, cetylpyridinium, and miramistin) to test their interaction with OCT and MATE transporters. We used Bayesian machine learning models to generate predictions for each molecule with each transporter and also experimentally determined IC50 values for each compound against labeled substrate transport into CHO cells that stably expressed OCT2, MATE1, or MATE2-K using three structurally distinct substrates (atenolol, metformin and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) to assess the impact of substrate structure on inhibitory efficacy. For the OCTs substrate identity influenced IC50 values, although the effect was larger and more systematic for OCT2. In contrast, inhibition of MATE1-mediated transport was largely insensitive to substrate identity. Unlike MATE1, inhibition of MATE2-K was influenced, albeit modestly, by substrate identity. Maximum unbound plasma concentration/IC50 ratios were used to identify potential clinical DDI recommendations; all the compounds interacted with the OCT/MATE secretory pathway, most with sufficient avidity to represent potential DDI issues for secretion of cationic drugs. This should be considered when proposing cationic agents as repurposed antivirals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: Drugs proposed as potential COVID-19 therapeutics based on in vitro activity data against SARS-CoV-2 include compounds with positive charges at physiological pH, making them potential interactors with the OCT/MATE renal secretory pathway. We tested seven such molecules as inhibitors of OCT1/2 and MATE1/2-K. All the compounds blocked transport activity regardless of substrate used to monitor activity. Suggesting that plasma concentrations achieved by normal clinical application of the test agents could be expected to influence the pharmacokinetics of selected cationic drugs.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Benzalkonium Compounds/pharmacology , CHO Cells , Cetylpyridinium/pharmacology , Chloroquine/analogs & derivatives , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Cricetinae , Cricetulus , Naphthyridines/pharmacology , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/drug effects , Quinacrine/pharmacology , Tilorone/pharmacology
8.
J Cell Biochem ; 123(2): 155-160, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473858

ABSTRACT

Drug repurposing is an attractive option for identifying new treatment strategies, in particular in extraordinary situations of urgent need such as the current coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic. Recently, the World Health Organization announced testing of three drugs as potential Covid-19 therapeutics that are known for their dampening effect on the immune system. Thus, the underlying concept of selecting these drugs is to temper the potentially life-threatening overshooting of the immune system reacting to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. This viewpoint discusses the possibility that the impact of these and other drugs on autophagy contributes to their therapeutic effect by hampering the SARS-CoV-2 life cycle.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Artesunate/pharmacology , Autophagy/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , Infliximab/pharmacology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Artesunate/therapeutic use , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Drug Development , Endoplasmic Reticulum/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum/physiology , Endoplasmic Reticulum/virology , Endosomes/drug effects , Endosomes/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Infliximab/therapeutic use , Intracellular Membranes/drug effects , Intracellular Membranes/physiology , Intracellular Membranes/virology , Ivermectin/pharmacology , Macrolides/pharmacology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Niclosamide/pharmacology , Niclosamide/therapeutic use , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19998, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462031

ABSTRACT

Understanding the effects of metabolism on the rational design of novel and more effective drugs is still a considerable challenge. To the best of our knowledge, there are no entirely computational strategies that make it possible to predict these effects. From this perspective, the development of such methodologies could contribute to significantly reduce the side effects of medicines, leading to the emergence of more effective and safer drugs. Thereby, in this study, our strategy is based on simulating the electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS) fragmentation of the drug molecules and combined with molecular docking and ADMET models in two different situations. In the first model, the drug is docked without considering the possible metabolic effects. In the second model, each of the intermediates from the EI-MS results is docked, and metabolism occurs before the drug accesses the biological target. As a proof of concept, in this work, we investigate the main antiviral drugs used in clinical research to treat COVID-19. As a result, our strategy made it possible to assess the biological activity and toxicity of all potential by-products. We believed that our findings provide new chemical insights that can benefit the rational development of novel drugs in the future.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenine/adverse effects , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Adenine/metabolism , Adenine/pharmacology , Adenosine/adverse effects , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/pharmacology , Amides/adverse effects , Amides/metabolism , Amides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/metabolism , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Chloroquine/analogs & derivatives , Chloroquine/metabolism , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Drug Design , Humans , Metabolic Networks and Pathways , Molecular Docking Simulation , Nitro Compounds/adverse effects , Nitro Compounds/metabolism , Nitro Compounds/pharmacology , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Pyrazines/metabolism , Pyrazines/pharmacology , Pyrrolidines/adverse effects , Pyrrolidines/metabolism , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , Ribavirin/adverse effects , Ribavirin/metabolism , Ribavirin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Thiazoles/adverse effects , Thiazoles/metabolism , Thiazoles/pharmacology
10.
Theriogenology ; 177: 1-10, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458733

ABSTRACT

Chloroquine (CQ) could function as a lysosomotropic agent to inhibit the endolysosomal trafficking in the autophagy pathway, and is widely used on malarial, tumor and recently COVID-19. However, the effect of CQ treatment on porcine immature Sertoli cells (iSCs) remains unclear. Here we showed that CQ could reduce iSC viability in a dose-dependent manner. CQ treatment (20 µM) on iSCs for 36h could elevate oxidative stress, damage mitochondrial function and promote apoptosis, which could be partially rescued by melatonin (MT) (10 nM). Transcriptome profiling identified 1611 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (776 up- and 835 down-regulated) (20 µM CQ vs. DMSO), mainly involved in MAPK cascade, cell proliferation/apoptosis, HIF-1, PI3K-Akt and lysosome signaling pathways. In contrast, only 467 (224 up- and 243 down-regulated) DEGs (CQ + MT vs. DMSO) could be found after MT (10 nM) addition, enriched in cell cycle, regulation of apoptotic process, lysosome and reproduction pathways. Therefore, the partial rescue effects of MT on CQ treatment were confirmed by multiple assays (cell viability, ROS level, mitochondrial function, apoptosis, and mRNA levels of selected genes). Collectively, CQ treatment could impair porcine iSC viability by deranging the signaling pathways related to apoptosis and autophagy, which could be partially rescued by MT supplementation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Melatonin , Swine Diseases , Animals , Apoptosis , Autophagy , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/veterinary , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Male , Melatonin/pharmacology , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases , SARS-CoV-2 , Sertoli Cells , Swine
11.
Bioorg Chem ; 116: 105346, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401246

ABSTRACT

Starting from the antimalarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, we conducted a structural optimization on the side chain of chloroquine by introducing amino substituted longer chains thus leading to a series of novel aminochloroquine derivatives. Anti-infectious effects against SARS-Cov2 spike glycoprotein as well as immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory activities of the new compounds were evaluated. Distinguished immunosuppressive activities on the responses of T cell, B cell and macrophages upon mitogen and pathogenic signaling were manifested. Compounds 9-11 displayed the most promising inhibitory effects both on cellular proliferation and on the production of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-17, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-1ß and TNF-α, which might be insightful in the pursuit of treatment for immune disorders and inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Amines/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Chloroquine/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Amines/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/chemical synthesis , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Chloroquine/chemical synthesis , Chloroquine/chemistry , Cytokines/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Molecular Structure , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
12.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 218, 2020 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387198

Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Cardiac Glycosides/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biological Products/chemistry , Biological Products/pharmacology , Bufanolides/chemistry , Bufanolides/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Cardiac Glycosides/chemistry , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chloroquine/chemistry , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Digoxin/chemistry , Digoxin/pharmacology , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/genetics , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/genetics , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Pandemics , Phenanthrenes/chemistry , Phenanthrenes/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/antagonists & inhibitors , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/genetics , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
13.
ACS Chem Biol ; 15(9): 2331-2337, 2020 09 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387140

ABSTRACT

We report on using the synthetic aminoadamantane-CH2-aryl derivatives 1-6 as sensitive probes for blocking M2 S31N and influenza A virus (IAV) M2 wild-type (WT) channels as well as virus replication in cell culture. The binding kinetics measured using electrophysiology (EP) for M2 S31N channel are very dependent on the length between the adamantane moiety and the first ring of the aryl headgroup realized in 2 and 3 and the girth and length of the adamantane adduct realized in 4 and 5. Study of 1-6 shows that, according to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) calculations, all bind in the M2 S31N channel with the adamantyl group positioned between V27 and G34 and the aryl group projecting out of the channel with the phenyl (or isoxazole in 6) embedded in the V27 cluster. In this outward binding configuration, an elongation of the ligand by only one methylene in rimantadine 2 or using diamantane or triamantane instead of adamantane in 4 and 5, respectively, causes incomplete entry and facilitates exit, abolishing effective block compared to the amantadine derivatives 1 and 6. In the active M2 S31N blockers 1 and 6, the phenyl and isoxazolyl head groups achieve a deeper binding position and high kon/low koff and high kon/high koff rate constants, compared to inactive 2-5, which have much lower kon and higher koff. Compounds 1-5 block the M2 WT channel by binding in the longer area from V27-H37, in the inward orientation, with high kon and low koff rate constants. Infection of cell cultures by influenza virus containing M2 WT or M2 S31N is inhibited by 1-5 or 1-4 and 6, respectively. While 1 and 6 block infection through the M2 block mechanism in the S31N variant, 2-4 may block M2 S31N virus replication in cell culture through the lysosomotropic effect, just as chloroquine is thought to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Adamantane/pharmacology , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Ion Channels/antagonists & inhibitors , Molecular Probes/chemistry , Viral Matrix Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Adamantane/analogs & derivatives , Adamantane/chemistry , Adamantane/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Binding Sites , COVID-19 , Cells, Cultured , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Genetic Variation , Humans , Influenza A virus/chemistry , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Kinetics , Molecular Probes/metabolism , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2 , Structure-Activity Relationship , Virus Replication/drug effects
14.
J Agric Food Chem ; 69(36): 10669-10677, 2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379298

ABSTRACT

Chloroquine (CQ) is a famous medicine for treatment of diseases including malaria and pneumonia caused by COVID-19, but gastrointestinal disorder caused by its oral administration is a great concern. Milk is usually recommended to be taken with CQ to reduce such effect. However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unknown. Here, we found that ß-lactoglobulin (ß-LG), α-lactalbumin (α-LA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin (LF) in whey proteins were able to interact with CQ to form complexes as suggested by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and molecular docking. Indeed, the crystal structure revealed that ß-LG is bound to CQ through hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding with a ratio of 1:1. Consequently, the formation of these protein-CQ complexes not only reduced the cytotoxicity of chloroquine to the stomach and gut cells but also facilitated its uptake by cells. This work gave an example to understand the relationship between food and drug.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chloroquine , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Humans , Lactalbumin , Lactoglobulins , Milk Proteins , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2 , Whey Proteins
15.
S Afr Med J ; 111(8): 720-723, 2021 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355170

ABSTRACT

Herbal medicines made from the bark of the Cinchona tree, and later quinine, have been widely used for centuries to treat medical conditions such as tropical malaria. More recently, chloroquine (CQ) and its synthetic derivatives have been used as antimalarials and to treat systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and in the past 14 months or so, COVID-19 pneumonia. Anecdotal evidence and the erratic covering through social media of its potential efficacy in the treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia have resulted in the widespread off-label use of CQ in South Africa and worldwide. This study aimed to show that access to CQ as a chronic medication for rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases was limited during the COVID-19 pandemic, and that this resulted in an increased incidence of flares in these patients, affecting their morbidity and potentially leading to mortality.


Subject(s)
Chloroquine/pharmacology , Rheumatology/standards , Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Antirheumatic Agents/pharmacology , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Humans , Musculoskeletal Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatology/methods , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data
16.
Biochimie ; 179: 237-246, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326916

ABSTRACT

The anti-malarial drug Chloroquine (CQ) and its derivative hydroxychloroquine have shown antiviral activities in vitro against many viruses, including coronaviruses, dengue virus and the biosafety level 4 Nipah and Hendra paramyxoviruses. The in vivo efficacy of CQ in the treatment of COVID-19 is currently a matter of debate. CQ is a lysosomotrophic compound that accumulates in lysosomes, as well as in food vacuoles of Plasmodium falciparum. In the treatment of malaria, CQ impairs the digestion and growth of the parasite by increasing the pH of the food vacuole. Similarly, it is assumed that the antiviral effects of CQ results from the increase of lysosome pH and the inhibition of acidic proteases involved in the maturation of virus fusion protein. CQ has however other effects, among which phospholipidosis, characterized by the accumulation of multivesicular bodies within the cell. The increase in phospholipid species particularly concerns bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP), a specific lipid of late endosomes involved in vesicular trafficking and pH-dependent vesicle budding. It was shown previously that drugs like progesterone, the cationic amphiphile U18666A and the phospholipase inhibitor methyl arachidonyl fluoro phosphonate (MAFP) induce the accumulation of BMP in THP-1 cells and decrease cell infection by human immunodeficiency virus. HIV viral particles were found to be retained into large endosomal-type vesicles, preventing virus spreading. Since BMP was also reported to favour virus entry through hijacking of the endocytic pathway, we propose here that BMP could play a dual role in viral infection, with its antiviral effects triggered by lysosomotropic drugs like CQ.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Endocytosis/drug effects , Endosomes/drug effects , Endosomes/metabolism , Lysophospholipids/metabolism , Monoglycerides/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
17.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 908: 174374, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322083

ABSTRACT

The efficacy of corticosteroids and its use for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infections is controversial. In this study, using data sets of SARS-CoV-2 infected lung tissues and nasopharyngeal swabs, as well as in vitro experiments, we show that SARS-CoV-2 infection significantly downregulates DUSP1 expression. This downregulation of DUSP1 could be the mechanism regulating the enhanced activation of MAPK pathway as well as the reported steroid resistance in SARS-CoV-2 infection. Moreover, chloroquine, an off labeled COVID-19 drug is able to induce DUSP1 and attenuate MAPK pathway; and is expected to improve sensitivity to steroid treatment. However, further mechanistic studies are required to confirm this effect.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Dual Specificity Phosphatase 1/genetics , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cells, Cultured , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Datasets as Topic , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Drug Resistance/drug effects , Drug Resistance/genetics , Drug Synergism , Dual Specificity Phosphatase 1/metabolism , Fibroblasts , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Lung/cytology , Lung/pathology , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , MAP Kinase Signaling System/genetics , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Off-Label Use , Primary Cell Culture , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
18.
Pharmacol Res ; 158: 104904, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318936

ABSTRACT

The anti-malarial drugs chloroquine (CQ) and primarily the less toxic hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) are currently used to treat autoimmune diseases for their immunomodulatory and anti-thrombotic properties. They have also been proposed for the treatment of several viral infections, due to their anti-viral effects in cell cultures and animal models, and, currently, for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the pandemic severe acute respiratory syndrome caused by coronavirus 2 (Sars-Cov-2) infection that is spreading all over the world. Although in some recent studies a clinical improvement in COVID-19 patients has been observed, the clinical efficacy of CQ and HCQ in COVID-19 has yet to be proven with randomized controlled studies, many of which are currently ongoing, also considering pharmacokinetics, optimal dosing regimen, therapeutic level and duration of treatment and taking into account patients with different severity degrees of disease. Here we review what is currently known on the mechanisms of action of CQ and HCQ as anti-viral, anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic drugs and discuss the up-to-date experimental evidence on the potential mechanisms of action of CQ/HCQ in Sars-Cov2 infection and the current clinical knowledge on their efficacy in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. Given the role of iron in several human viral infections, we also propose a different insight into a number of CQ and HCQ pharmacological effects, suggesting a potential involvement of iron homeostasis in Sars-Cov-2 infection and COVID-19 clinical course.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Homeostasis/drug effects , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Iron/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Biomol Struct Dyn ; 39(12): 4243-4255, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317834

ABSTRACT

Recent outbreak of novel Coronavirus disease () pandemic around the world is associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome. The death toll associated with the pandemic is increasing day by day. SARS-CoV-2 is an enveloped virus and its N terminal domain (NTD) of Nucleocapsid protein (N protein) binds to the viral (+) sense RNA and results in virus ribonucleoprotien complex, essential for the virus replication. The N protein is composed of a serine-rich linker region sandwiched between NTD and C terminal (CTD). These terminals play a role in viral entry and its processing post entry. The NTD of SARS-CoV-2 N protein forms orthorhombic crystals and binds to the viral genome. Therefore, there is always a quest to target RNA binding domain of nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (NTD-N-protein which in turn may help in controlling diseases caused by SARS-CoV-2 in humans. The role of Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine as potential treatments for is still under debate globally because of some side effects associated with it. This study involves the In silico interactions of Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine with the NTD-N-protein of SARS-CoV-2. With the help of various computational methods, we have explored the potential role of both of these antiviral drugs for the treatment of patients by comparing the efficacy of both of the drugs to bind to NTD-N-protein. In our research Hydroxychloroquine exhibited potential inhibitory effects of NTD-N-protein with binding energy -7.28 kcal/mol than Chloroquine (-6.30 kcal/mol) at SARS-CoV-2 receptor recognition of susceptible cells. The outcomes of this research strongly appeal for in vivo trials of Hydroxychloroquine for the patients infected with . Furthermore, the recommended doses of Hydroxychloroquine may reduce the chances of catching to the healthcare workers and staff who are in contact with or delivering direct care to coronavirus patients as long as they have not been diagnosed with . We further hypothesize that the comparative NTD-N-protein -drug docking interactions may help to understand the comparative efficacy of other candidate repurposing drugs until discovery of a proper vaccine.Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydroxychloroquine , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Computer Simulation , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Nucleocapsid , Nucleocapsid Proteins , RNA-Binding Motifs , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther ; 379(1): 96-107, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307875

ABSTRACT

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, drug repurposing has been highlighted for rapid introduction of therapeutics. Proposed drugs with activity against SARS-CoV-2 include compounds with positive charges at physiologic pH, making them potential targets for the organic cation secretory transporters of kidney and liver, i.e., the basolateral organic cation transporters, OCT1 and OCT2; and the apical multidrug and toxin extruders, MATE1 and MATE2-K. We selected several compounds proposed to have in vitro activity against SARS-CoV-2 (chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, quinacrine, tilorone, pyronaridine, cetylpyridinium, and miramistin) to test their interaction with OCT and MATE transporters. We used Bayesian machine learning models to generate predictions for each molecule with each transporter and also experimentally determined IC50 values for each compound against labeled substrate transport into CHO cells that stably expressed OCT2, MATE1, or MATE2-K using three structurally distinct substrates (atenolol, metformin and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) to assess the impact of substrate structure on inhibitory efficacy. For the OCTs substrate identity influenced IC50 values, although the effect was larger and more systematic for OCT2. In contrast, inhibition of MATE1-mediated transport was largely insensitive to substrate identity. Unlike MATE1, inhibition of MATE2-K was influenced, albeit modestly, by substrate identity. Maximum unbound plasma concentration/IC50 ratios were used to identify potential clinical DDI recommendations; all the compounds interacted with the OCT/MATE secretory pathway, most with sufficient avidity to represent potential DDI issues for secretion of cationic drugs. This should be considered when proposing cationic agents as repurposed antivirals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: Drugs proposed as potential COVID-19 therapeutics based on in vitro activity data against SARS-CoV-2 include compounds with positive charges at physiological pH, making them potential interactors with the OCT/MATE renal secretory pathway. We tested seven such molecules as inhibitors of OCT1/2 and MATE1/2-K. All the compounds blocked transport activity regardless of substrate used to monitor activity. Suggesting that plasma concentrations achieved by normal clinical application of the test agents could be expected to influence the pharmacokinetics of selected cationic drugs.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Benzalkonium Compounds/pharmacology , CHO Cells , Cetylpyridinium/pharmacology , Chloroquine/analogs & derivatives , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Cricetinae , Cricetulus , Naphthyridines/pharmacology , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/drug effects , Quinacrine/pharmacology , Tilorone/pharmacology
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