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1.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(9)2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699265

ABSTRACT

There are genetic risk factors that influence the outcome of COVID-19 [COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative, Nature 600, 472-477 (2021)]. The major genetic risk factor for severe COIVD-19 resides on chromosome 3 and is inherited from Neandertals [H. Zeberg, S. Pääbo, Nature 587, 610-612 (2020)]. The risk-associated DNA segment modulates the expression of several chemokine receptors, among them CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV which is down-regulated in carriers of the COVID-19 risk haplotype. Here I show that carriers of the risk variant have an ∼27% lower risk of HIV infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , HIV Infections/genetics , HIV-1 , Haplotypes , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Patient Acuity , Risk Factors
2.
EBioMedicine ; 75: 103806, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611694

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To identify host genetic variants (SNPs) associated with COVID-19 disease severity, a number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted. Since most of the identified variants are located at non-coding regions, such variants are presumed to affect the expression of neighbouring genes, thereby influencing COVID-19 disease severity. However, it remains largely unknown which genes are influenced by such COVID-19 GWAS loci. METHODS: CRISPRi (interference)-mediated gene expression analysis was performed to identify genes functionally regulated by COVID-19 GWAS loci by targeting regions near the loci (SNPs) in lung epithelial cell lines. The expression of CRISPRi-identified genes was investigated using COVID-19-contracted human and monkey lung single-nucleus/cell (sn/sc) RNA-seq datasets. FINDINGS: CRISPRi analysis indicated that a region near rs11385942 at chromosome 3p21.31 (locus of highest significance with COVID-19 disease severity at intron 5 of LZTFL1) significantly affected the expression of LZTFL1 (P<0.05), an airway cilia regulator. A region near rs74956615 at chromosome 19p13.2 (locus located at the 3' untranslated exonic region of RAVER1), which is associated with critical illness in COVID-19, affected the expression of RAVER1 (P<0.05), a coactivator of MDA5 (IFIH1), which induces antiviral response genes, including ICAM1. The sn/scRNA-seq datasets indicated that the MDA5/RAVER1-ICAM1 pathway was activated in lung epithelial cells of COVID-19-resistant monkeys but not those of COVID-19-succumbed humans. INTERPRETATION: Patients with risk alleles of rs11385942 and rs74956615 may be susceptible to critical illness in COVID-19 in part through weakened airway viral clearance via LZTFL1-mediated ciliogenesis and diminished antiviral immune response via the MDA5/RAVER1 pathway, respectively. FUNDING: NIH.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Genetic Loci , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Ribonucleoproteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Transcription Factors/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19/metabolism , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/metabolism , Databases, Nucleic Acid , Genome-Wide Association Study , Haplorhini , Humans , RNA-Seq , Ribonucleoproteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Transcription Factors/metabolism
3.
J Clin Invest ; 131(23)2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546628

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThere is considerable variability in COVID-19 outcomes among younger adults, and some of this variation may be due to genetic predisposition.MethodsWe combined individual level data from 13,888 COVID-19 patients (n = 7185 hospitalized) from 17 cohorts in 9 countries to assess the association of the major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor (chromosome 3 locus tagged by rs10490770) with mortality, COVID-19-related complications, and laboratory values. We next performed metaanalyses using FinnGen and the Columbia University COVID-19 Biobank.ResultsWe found that rs10490770 risk allele carriers experienced an increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7). Risk allele carriers had increased odds of several COVID-19 complications: severe respiratory failure (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6), venous thromboembolism (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4), and hepatic injury (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-2.0). Risk allele carriers age 60 years and younger had higher odds of death or severe respiratory failure (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.8-3.9) compared with those of more than 60 years (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8; interaction, P = 0.038). Among individuals 60 years and younger who died or experienced severe respiratory failure, 32.3% were risk-variant carriers compared with 13.9% of those not experiencing these outcomes. This risk variant improved the prediction of death or severe respiratory failure similarly to, or better than, most established clinical risk factors.ConclusionsThe major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor is associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality, which are more pronounced among individuals 60 years or younger. The effect was similar in magnitude and more common than most established clinical risk factors, suggesting potential implications for future clinical risk management.


Subject(s)
Alleles , COVID-19 , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Gene Frequency , Genetic Loci , Polymorphism, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2 , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Risk Factors
4.
Nat Genet ; 53(11): 1606-1615, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503871

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused millions of deaths worldwide. Genome-wide association studies identified the 3p21.31 region as conferring a twofold increased risk of respiratory failure. Here, using a combined multiomics and machine learning approach, we identify the gain-of-function risk A allele of an SNP, rs17713054G>A, as a probable causative variant. We show with chromosome conformation capture and gene-expression analysis that the rs17713054-affected enhancer upregulates the interacting gene, leucine zipper transcription factor like 1 (LZTFL1). Selective spatial transcriptomic analysis of lung biopsies from patients with COVID-19 shows the presence of signals associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a viral response pathway that is regulated by LZTFL1. We conclude that pulmonary epithelial cells undergoing EMT, rather than immune cells, are likely responsible for the 3p21.31-associated risk. Since the 3p21.31 effect is conferred by a gain-of-function, LZTFL1 may represent a therapeutic target.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition , Lung/virology , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transcription Factors/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Transcription Factors/metabolism
5.
Genome Biol ; 22(1): 242, 2021 08 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370944

ABSTRACT

To date, the locus with the most robust human genetic association to COVID-19 severity is 3p21.31. Here, we integrate genome-scale CRISPR loss-of-function screens and eQTLs in diverse cell types and tissues to pinpoint genes underlying COVID-19 risk. Our findings identify SLC6A20 and CXCR6 as putative causal genes that modulate COVID-19 risk and highlight the usefulness of this integrative approach to bridge the divide between correlational and causal studies of human biology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics , Quantitative Trait Loci , Receptors, CXCR6/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Humans , Phenotype
7.
J Autoimmun ; 117: 102595, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014585

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Genetic variation at a multigene cluster at chromosome 3p21.31 and the ABO blood group have been associated with the risk of developing severe COVID-19, but the mechanism remains unclear. Complement activation has been associated with COVID-19 severity. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine whether chromosome 3p21.31 and the ABO variants are linked to the activation of the complement cascade in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We considered 72 unrelated European hospitalized patients with genetic data and evaluation of circulating C5a and soluble terminal complement complex C5b-9 (SC5b-9). Twenty-six (36.1%) patients carried the rs11385942 G>GA variant and 44 (66.1%) non-O blood group associated with increased risk of severe COVID-19. RESULTS: C5a and SC5-b9 plasma levels were higher in rs11385949 GA carriers than in non-carriers (P = 0.041 and P = 0.012, respectively), while C5a levels were higher in non-O group than in O group patients (P = 0.019). The association between rs11385949 and SC5b-9 remained significant after adjustment for ABO and disease severity (P = 0.004) and further correction for C5a (P = 0.018). There was a direct relationship between upper airways viral load and SC5b-9 in carriers of the rs11385949 risk allele (P = 0.032), which was not observed in non-carriers. CONCLUSIONS: The rs11385949 G>GA variant, tagging the chromosome 3 gene cluster variation and predisposing to severe COVID-19, is associated with enhanced complement activation, both with C5a and terminal complement complex, while non-O blood group with C5a levels. These findings provide a link between genetic susceptibility to more severe COVID-19 and complement activation.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Complement Activation/genetics , Genotype , Multigene Family/genetics , Aged , Complement C5a/genetics , Disease Progression , Female , Gene Frequency , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Load
10.
Nature ; 587(7835): 610-612, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808357

ABSTRACT

A recent genetic association study1 identified a gene cluster on chromosome 3 as a risk locus for respiratory failure after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). A separate study (COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative)2 comprising 3,199 hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and control individuals showed that this cluster is the major genetic risk factor for severe symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection and hospitalization. Here we show that the risk is conferred by a genomic segment of around 50 kilobases in size that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by around 50% of people in south Asia and around 16% of people in Europe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/physiopathology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Neanderthals/genetics , Animals , Asia/ethnology , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Europe/ethnology , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study , Haplotypes/genetics , Hospitalization , Humans , Linkage Disequilibrium/genetics , Multigene Family/genetics , Phylogeny , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/physiopathology
11.
N Engl J Med ; 383(16): 1522-1534, 2020 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-606974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is considerable variation in disease behavior among patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). Genomewide association analysis may allow for the identification of potential genetic factors involved in the development of Covid-19. METHODS: We conducted a genomewide association study involving 1980 patients with Covid-19 and severe disease (defined as respiratory failure) at seven hospitals in the Italian and Spanish epicenters of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in Europe. After quality control and the exclusion of population outliers, 835 patients and 1255 control participants from Italy and 775 patients and 950 control participants from Spain were included in the final analysis. In total, we analyzed 8,582,968 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and conducted a meta-analysis of the two case-control panels. RESULTS: We detected cross-replicating associations with rs11385942 at locus 3p21.31 and with rs657152 at locus 9q34.2, which were significant at the genomewide level (P<5×10-8) in the meta-analysis of the two case-control panels (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.48 to 2.11; P = 1.15×10-10; and odds ratio, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.47; P = 4.95×10-8, respectively). At locus 3p21.31, the association signal spanned the genes SLC6A20, LZTFL1, CCR9, FYCO1, CXCR6 and XCR1. The association signal at locus 9q34.2 coincided with the ABO blood group locus; in this cohort, a blood-group-specific analysis showed a higher risk in blood group A than in other blood groups (odds ratio, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.75; P = 1.48×10-4) and a protective effect in blood group O as compared with other blood groups (odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.79; P = 1.06×10-5). CONCLUSIONS: We identified a 3p21.31 gene cluster as a genetic susceptibility locus in patients with Covid-19 with respiratory failure and confirmed a potential involvement of the ABO blood-group system. (Funded by Stein Erik Hagen and others.).


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , Betacoronavirus , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Respiratory Insufficiency/genetics , Aged , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Genetic Loci , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Multigene Family , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain
12.
In Vivo ; 34(3 Suppl): 1633-1636, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-534631

ABSTRACT

In a previous study, we identified a 117 base severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) sequence in the human genome with 94.6% identity. The sequence was in chromosome 1p within an intronic region of the netrin G1 (NTNG1) gene. The sequence matched a sequence in the SARS-CoV-2 Orf1b gene in non-structural protein 14 (NSP14), which is an exonuclease and NSP15, an endoribonuclease. In the current study we compared the human genome with other viral genomes to determine some of the characteristics of human sequences found in the latter. Most of the viruses had human sequences, but they were short. Hepatitis A and St Louis encephalitis had human sequences that were longer than the 117 base SARS-Cov-2 sequence, but they were in non-coding regions of the human genome. The SARS-Cov-2 sequence was the only long sequence found in a human gene (NTNG1). The related coronaviruses SARS-Cov had a 41 BP human sequence on chromosome 3 that was not part of a human gene, and MERS had no human sequence. The 117 base SARS-CoV-2 human sequence is relatively close to the viral spike sequence, separated only by NSP16, a 904 base sequence. The mechanism for SARS-CoV-2 infection is the binding of the virus spike protein to the membrane-bound form of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and internalization of the complex by the host cell. We have no explanation for the NSP14 and NSP15 SARS-Cov-2 sequences we observed here or how they might relate to infectiousness. Further studies are warranted.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Genome, Viral , SARS Virus/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1/genetics , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , DNA Viruses/genetics , Endoribonucleases , GPI-Linked Proteins/genetics , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Netrins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid , Species Specificity , Viral Proteins/genetics
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