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1.
J Psychopharmacol ; 37(5): 437-448, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233017

ABSTRACT

The opioid crisis' pathways from first exposure onwards to eventual illnesses and fatalities are multiple, intertwined and difficult to dissect. Here, we offer a multidisciplinary appraisal of the relationships among mental health, chronic pain, prescribing patterns worldwide and the opioid crisis. Because the opioid crisis' toll is especially harsh on young people, emphasis is given on data regarding the younger strata of the population. Because analgesic opioid prescription constitute a recognised entry point towards misuse, opioid use disorder, and ultimately overdose, prescribing patterns across different countries are examined as a modifiable hazard factor along these pathways of risk. Psychiatrists are called to play a more compelling role in this urgent conversation, as they are uniquely placed to provide synthesis and lead action among the different fields of knowledge and care that lie at the crossroads of the opioid crisis. Psychiatrists are also ideally positioned to gauge and disseminate the foundations for diagnosis and clinical management of mental conditions associated with chronic pain, including the identification of hazardous and protective factors. It is our hope to spark more interdisciplinary exchanges and encourage psychiatrists worldwide to become leaders in an urgent conversation with interlocutors from the clinical and basic sciences, policy makers and stakeholders including clients and their families.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Opioid-Related Disorders , Humans , Adolescent , Chronic Pain/drug therapy , Mental Health , Opioid Epidemic , Analgesics, Opioid/adverse effects , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Practice Patterns, Physicians'
2.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 48(13): 950-961, 2023 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239200

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study of utilization patterns and variables of epidural injections in the fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare population. OBJECTIVES: To update the utilization of epidural injections in managing chronic pain in the FFS Medicare population, from 2000 to 2020, and assess the impact of COVID-19. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The analysis of the utilization of interventional techniques also showed an annual decrease of 2.5% per 100,000 FFS Medicare enrollees from 2009 to 2018, contrasting to an annual increase of 7.3% from 2000 to 2009. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has not been assessed. METHODS: This analysis was performed by utilizing master data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, physician/supplier procedure summary from 2000 to 2020. The analysis was performed by the assessment of utilization patterns using guidance from Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology. RESULTS: Epidural procedures declined at a rate of 19% per 100,000 Medicare enrollees in the FFS Medicare population in the United States from 2019 to 2020, with an annual decline of 3% from 2010 to 2019. From 2000 to 2010, there was an annual increase of 8.3%. This analysis showed a decline in all categories of epidural procedures from 2019 to 2020. The major impact of COVID-19, with closures taking effect from April 1, 2020, through December 31, 2020, will be steeper and rather dramatic compared with April 1 to December 31, 2019. However, monthly data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is not available as of now. Overall declines from 2010 to 2019 showed a decrease for cervical and thoracic transforaminal injections with an annual decrease of 5.6%, followed by lumbar interlaminar and caudal epidural injections of 4.9%, followed by 1.8% for lumbar/sacral transforaminal epidurals, and 0.9% for cervical and thoracic interlaminar epidurals. CONCLUSION: Declining utilization of epidural injections in all categories was exacerbated to a decrease of 19% from 2019 to 2020, related, in part, to the COVID-19 pandemic. This followed declining patterns of epidural procedures of 3% overall annually from 2010 to 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Aged , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Chronic Pain/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , Medicare , COVID-19/epidemiology , Injections, Epidural
3.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 24(1): 457, 2023 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242856

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) versus myofascial release therapy (MRT) on college students with chronic mechanical neck pain (CMNP). METHODS: Thirty-three college students with a mean age of 21.33 ± 0.98 involved in distance learning due to the Corona Virus 2019 (COVID-19) restriction were randomized to receive either IASTM on the upper trapezius and levator scapulae muscles or MRT. Researchers measured their pain with a visual analog scale (VAS), function with neck disability index (NDI), and pain pressure threshold (PPT) with a pressure algometer. The subjects received eight therapy sessions over four weeks and outcome measures were assessed pre and post-intervention. The study was registered as a clinical trial on clinicaltrials.gov (registration number: NCT05213871). RESULT: Unpaired t-test showed no statistical significance between the two groups post-intervention regarding improvement in pain, function, and PPT (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: This study showed insignificant differences between groups. However, we did not use a control group, indicating that the improvement in outcomes may not have been caused by the intervention. STUDY DESIGN: Quasi-experimental two groups pre-posttest clinical trial. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapy, level 2b.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Myofascial Pain Syndromes , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Neck Pain/diagnosis , Neck Pain/therapy , Myofascial Release Therapy , Pain Threshold , Myofascial Pain Syndromes/therapy , Chronic Pain/diagnosis , Chronic Pain/therapy
4.
Complement Ther Clin Pract ; 52: 101771, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is typically managed with anti-inflammatory analgesics and opioids; however, these do not adequately manage the pain or address the associated negative impact on quality of life. Hypnotherapy has been found to reduce pain associated with a range of disorders, including some with symptoms of chronic pain. AIM: The aim of this review is to systematically scope research investigating the use of hypnosis on chronic pelvic pain, quality of life, anxiety, depression and fatigue. METHOD: The scoping review was guided by the method described by Arksey and O'Mallee [1]. A systematic search was conducted in six databases. The Covidence Risk of Bias tool and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) quality assessment tool were used. RESULTS: Nine studies (four RCT's and five case series) were suitable for inclusion. Meta-analysis of the RCT's found no significant difference in pain or quality of life for the intervention group compared to controls. Only one study reported a reduction in pain after hypnotherapy and did not outperform controls. These results are limited due to lack of a standardised intervention and heterogeneity of the included studies. CONCLUSION: There is a need for further research using well designed randomized controlled trials with validated measures of pain, quality of life, anxiety, depression and fatigue. Hypnotherapy interventions utilised in further research should be grounded in evidence-based best practice for dealing with pain.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Hypnosis , Humans , Chronic Pain/therapy , Quality of Life , Hypnosis/methods , Pelvic Pain/therapy , Fatigue
5.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e070920, 2023 05 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234310

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a disabling and distressing chronic pain condition characterised by a range of sensory, motor, autonomic and trophic symptoms. UK guidelines recommend therapy interventions to help normalise touch perception through self-administered tactile and thermal desensitisation activities. Interventions have been developed, aiming to help individuals broaden their sensory experience, thereby relieving chronic pain. However, therapy-led interventions often experience practical constraints and poor adherence. In response, a sensory training system (STS) device has been designed for unsupervised independent home-use. METHODS: This proof-of-concept study aims to explore whether people with CRPS use the device at home for 30 minutes a day for 30 days. Secondary aims are to determine whether the STS device will change tactile acuity and perceived levels of pain intensity, pain interference, sensitivity or feelings towards the affected limb. We will seek to recruit 20 eligible participants. Participants will be asked to measure tactile acuity using a two-point discrimination assessment, complete an online questionnaire before and after use of the device and complete a daily diary. On completion of the 30-day use, participants will be invited to take part in a semi-structured interview to explore their experiences of using the device. ANALYSIS: Pain intensity and pain interference will be scored using the online Assessment Center Scoring Service or using the look-up table in the PROMIS scoring manual. The remaining questionnaire data, including tactile acuity results, and device-use data, including frequency and duration of use, will be analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data will be thematically analysed. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: London-Stanmore Research Ethics Committee provided a favourable opinion on 19 April 2021 (ref 21/LO/0200). The NHS Health Research Authority, UK, approved this study on 7 June 2021. Dissemination will include peer-reviewed publications, presentations at conferences, social media and reports to the funder and patient charities. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN89099843.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Complex Regional Pain Syndromes , Humans , Chronic Pain/therapy , Complex Regional Pain Syndromes/therapy , Touch , Pain Measurement/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Curr Rheumatol Rep ; 25(7): 128-143, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318021

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain; however, the extent of its impact has not been established. We conducted a comprehensive review of the pandemic's impact on clinical outcomes and healthcare accessibility for osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), fibromyalgia (FM), lower back pain (LBP), and other musculoskeletal disorders and chronic pain syndromes to better inform clinical decision-making. RECENT FINDINGS: We examined 30 studies (n = 18,810) from 36 countries investigating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on chronic musculoskeletal pain outcomes. The available evidence suggests that the pandemic significantly impacted pain levels, mental health, quality of life and healthcare accessibility in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Of 30 studies, 25 (83%) reported symptom worsening, and 20 (67%) reported reduced healthcare accessibility. Patients were unable to access necessary care services during the pandemic, including orthopedic surgeries, medications, and complementary therapies, leading to worsened pain, psychological health, and quality of life. Across conditions, vulnerable patients reported high pain catastrophizing, psychological stress, and low physical activity related to social isolation. Notably, positive coping strategies, regular physical activity, and social support were associated with positive health outcomes. Most patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain had greatly affected pain severity, physical function, and quality of life during the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, the pandemic significantly impacted treatment accessibility, preventing necessary therapies. These findings support further prioritization of chronic musculoskeletal pain patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Musculoskeletal Pain , Humans , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Chronic Pain/psychology , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Pain/therapy , Quality of Life , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
7.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e066189, 2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317608

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The 2021 Action Plan for Pain from the Canadian Pain Task Force advocates for patient-centred pain care at all levels of healthcare across provinces. Shared decision-making is the crux of patient-centred care. Implementing the action plan will require innovative shared decision-making interventions, specifically following the disruption of chronic pain care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The first step in this endeavour is to assess current decisional needs (ie, decisions most important to them) of Canadians with chronic pain across their care pathways. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: DesignGrounded in patient-oriented research approaches, we will perform an online population-based survey across the ten Canadian provinces. We will report methods and data following the CROSS reporting guidelines.SamplingThe Léger Marketing company will administer the online population-based survey to its representative panel of 500 000 Canadians to recruit 1646 adults (age ≥18 years old) with chronic pain according to the definition by the International Association for the Study of Pain (eg, pain ≥12 weeks). ContentBased on the Ottawa Decision Support Framework, the self-administered survey has been codesigned with patients and contain six core domains: (1) healthcare services, consultation and postpandemic needs, (2) difficult decisions experienced, (3) decisional conflict, (4) decisional regret, (5) decisional needs and (6) sociodemographic characteristics. We will use several strategies such as random sampling to improve survey quality. AnalysisWe will perform descriptive statistical analysis. We will identify factors associated with clinically significant decisional conflict and decision regret using multivariate analyses. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics was approved by the Research Ethics Board at the Research Centre of the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke (project #2022-4645). We will codesign knowledge mobilisation products with research patient partners (eg, graphical summaries and videos). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed journals and national and international conferences to inform the development of innovative shared decision-making interventions for Canadians with chronic pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Adult , Humans , Adolescent , Needs Assessment , Chronic Pain/therapy , Pandemics , Canada , Surveys and Questionnaires , Decision Making
8.
Pain Physician ; 26(3): E223-E231, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316486

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (tMS) offer a novel noninvasive treatment option for chronic pain. While the recent COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus resulted in a temporary interruption of the treatments for patients, it provided an excellent opportunity to assess the long-term sustainability of the treatment, and the feasibility of resuming the treatments after a brief period of interruption as no such data are available in current literature. METHODS: First, a list of patients whose pain/headache conditions have been stably controlled with either treatment for at least 6 months prior to the 3-month pandemic-related shutdown was generated. Those who returned for treatments after the shutdown were identified and their underlying pain diagnoses, pre- and posttreatment Mechanical Visual Analog Scale (M-VAS) pain scores, 3-item Pain, Enjoyment, and General Activity (PEG-3), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores were assessed in 3 phases: Phase I (P1) consisted of a 6-month pre-COVID-19 period in which pain conditions were stably managed with either treatment modality; Phase II (P2) consisted of the first treatment visit period immediately after COVID-19 shutdown; and Phase III (P3) consisted of a 3-4 month post-COVID-19 shutdown period patients received up to 3 sessions of either treatment modality after the P2 treatment. RESULTS: For pre- and posttreatment M-VAS pain scores, mixed-effect analyses for both treatment groups demonstrated significant (P < 0.01) time interactions across all phases. For pretreatment M-VAS pain scores, TMS (n = 27) between-phase analyses indicated a significant (F = 13.572, P = 0.002) increase from 37.7 ± 27.6 at P1 to 49.6 ± 25.9 at P2, which then decreased significantly (F = 12.752, P = 0.001) back to an average score of 37.1 ± 24.7 at P3. Similarly, tMS (n = 25) between-phase analyses indicated the mean pretreatment pain score (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) increased significantly (F = 13.383, P = 0.003) from 34.9 ± 25.1 at P1 to 56.3 ± 27.0 at P2, which then decreased significantly (F = 5.464, P = 0.027) back to an average score of 41.9 ± 26.4 at P3. For posttreatment pain scores, the TMS group between-phase analysis indicated the mean posttreatment pain score (mean ± SD) increased significantly (F = 14.206, P = 0.002) from 25.6 ± 22.9 at P1 to 36.2 ± 23.4 at P2, which then significantly decreased (F = 16.063, P < 0.001) back to an average score of 23.2 ± 21.3 at P3. The tMS group between-phase analysis indicates a significant (F = 8.324, P = 0.012) interaction between P1 and P2 only with the mean posttreatment pain score (mean ± SD) increased from 24.9 ± 25.7 at P1 to 36.9 ± 26.7 at P2. The combined PEG-3 score between-phase analyses demonstrated similar significant (P < 0.001) changes across the phases in both treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: Both TMS and tMS treatment interruptions resulted in an increase of pain/headache severity and interference of quality of life and functions. However, the pain/headache symptoms, patients' quality of life, or function can quickly be improved once the maintenance treatments were restarted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation/methods , Headache/etiology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Chronic Pain/etiology , Treatment Outcome
9.
Reprod Fertil ; 4(2)2023 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316266

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Patients with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) may experience pain exacerbations requiring hospital admissions. Due to the effects of backlogged elective surgeries and outpatient gynaecology appointments resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, we hypothesised that there would be an increased number of women admitted with CPP flares. We conducted a retrospective review of all acute gynaecology admissions at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh from July to December 2018 (pre-COVID) and 2021 (post-COVID lockdown). We collected information on the proportion of emergency admissions due to CPP, inpatient investigations and subsequent management. Average total indicative hospital inpatient costs for women with CPP were calculated using NHS National Cost Collection data guidance. There was no significant difference in the number of emergency admissions due to pelvic pain before (153/507) and after (160/461) the COVID-19 pandemic. As high as 33 and 31% had a background history of CPP, respectively. Across both timepoints, investigations in women with CPP had low diagnostic yield: <25% had abnormal imaging findings and 0% had positive vaginal swab cultures. Women with CPP received significantly more inpatient morphine, pain team reviews and were more likely to be discharged with strong opioids. Total yearly inpatient costs were £170,104 and £179,156 in 2018 and 2021, respectively. Overall, emergency admission rates for managing CPP flares was similar before and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Inpatient resource use for women with CPP remains high, investigations have low diagnostic yield and frequent instigation of opiates on discharge may risk dependence. Improved community care of CPP is needed to reduce emergency gynaecology resource utilisation. Lay summary: Existing treatments for chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and endometriosis focus on surgery or hormone medication, but these are often ineffective or associated with unacceptable side-effects. As a result, women continue to experience chronic pain and often have 'flares' of worsening pain that may lead to hospital admission. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in backlogged gynaecology clinics and surgeries. The aim of this study was to compare the management of emergency pelvic pain admissions for women with CPP before and after COVID-19. We also aimed to better understand their in-hospital management and estimate their hospital length of stay costs. We did not find an increase in CPP patients admitted for pelvic pain flares after the COVID-19 lockdown. Women with CPP often undergo multiple hospital tests and are often prescribed with strong pain medications which can cause long-term problems. Efforts are needed to improve long-term pain management for women with CPP.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Pelvic Pain , Animals , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Inpatients , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/veterinary , Communicable Disease Control , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Chronic Pain/veterinary , Pelvic Pain/epidemiology , Pelvic Pain/therapy , Pelvic Pain/etiology , Pelvic Pain/veterinary
10.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1046683, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313674

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a variable effect on vulnerable populations, including patients with chronic pain who rely on opioid treatment or have comorbid opioid use disorder. Limited access to care due to isolation measures may lead to increased pain severity, worse mental health symptoms, and adverse opioid-related outcomes. This scoping review aimed to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the dual epidemics of chronic pain and opioids in marginalized communities worldwide. Methods: Searches of primary databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and PsycINFO were performed in March 2022, restricting the publication date to December 1, 2019. The search yielded 685 articles. After title and abstract screening, 526 records were screened by title and abstract, 87 through full-text review, of which 25 articles were included in the final analysis. Results: Our findings illuminate the differential distribution of pain burden across marginalized groups and how it serves to heighten existing disparities. Service disruptions due to social distancing orders and infrastructural limitations prevented patients from receiving the care they needed, resulting in adverse psychological and physical health outcomes. Efforts to adapt to COVID-19 circumstances included modifications to opioid prescribing regulations and workflows and expanded telemedicine services. Conclusion: Results have implications for the prevention and management of chronic pain and opioid use disorder, such as challenges in adopting telemedicine in low-resource settings and opportunities to strengthen public health and social care systems with a multidisciplinary and multidimensional approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Opioid-Related Disorders , Humans , Chronic Pain/drug therapy , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Opioid-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Opioid-Related Disorders/therapy
11.
Pain Pract ; 23(4): 359-367, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305111

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Chronic pain can trigger both physical and mental health complications. During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with chronic diseases have had reduced access to some medications. OBJECTIVE: To determine the pharmacological management of patients with chronic pain and its continuity during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This was a retrospective longitudinal study of the continuity of analgesic use in patients with chronic pain between September 1, 2019 and February 28, 2021 based on a drug dispensing database. Survival analysis was performed until the discontinuation of chronic analgesics. RESULTS: A total of 12,701 patients who were being treated for chronic pain were identified. Their median age was 70.3 years, and 74.4% were women. The pain of rheumatological origin was the most frequent etiology (46.1%); the most used medications were nonopioid analgesics (78.9%), pain modulators (24.8%) and opioid analgesics (23.3%). A total of 76.1% of the patients experienced interruptions in their management during the study period. The median time to the first interruption of treatment was 5.0 months (95% CI: 4.8-5.2). Those who were treated for oncological pain experienced a greater number of interruptions in their management. CONCLUSIONS: The pharmacological management of patients with chronic pain is heterogeneous, and this real-world study showed that a high proportion of patients experienced an interruption of pain management during the 12 months following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , Female , Aged , Male , Chronic Pain/drug therapy , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/complications , Analgesics/therapeutic use , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use
12.
Acta Neuropsychiatr ; 34(3): 127-131, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275377

ABSTRACT

Chronic pain is a debilitating medical condition affecting a significant percentage of the population worldwide. Considerable evidence suggests that pain is an independent risk factor for suicide and inadequately managing pain has been identified as a risk for suicidal behaviour. Additionally, medications used to treat pain may also contribute to suicidal behaviour. Extensive research on pain highlights deficiencies in the clinical management on pain with more gaps in care when patients have pain in combination with mental illness and suicidal behaviour. Providing trainees additional knowledge and equipping them with relevant tools to screen and manage chronic pain efficiently is a potential strategy to mitigate suicide risk. Also, trainees need to be educated on how to screen for suicidality in individuals with pain and apply suicide prevention interventions. This paper will emphasise the necessity to improve education about pain, its close relationship with suicide and effective suicide screening as well as management strategies for medical providers. With additional research, it is the hope that novel treatment modalities will be developed to treat pain to improve the quality of life of individuals suffering from this condition and to decrease suicide risk in this patient population.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Suicide Prevention , Chronic Pain/therapy , Humans , Quality of Life , Risk Factors , Suicidal Ideation
13.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 40(6): 1065-1072, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2260696

ABSTRACT

Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a chronic widespread pain syndrome characterised by fatigue, sleep disturbances and many idiopathic pain symptoms. The aim of this review is to describe and summarise the most recent findings concerning the diagnosis, aetiopathogenesis and treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome published between January 2021 and January 2022 and appearing on PubMed database. In particular, last year's literature focused on the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on FM patients, on new aetiopathogenetic horizons and the last conclusions about pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Fibromyalgia , Fatigue/complications , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/etiology , Humans , Pandemics
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(6)2023 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279040

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The onset of the coronavirus disease in 2019 necessitated a rapid transition to virtual care for chronic pain treatment. METHODS: A mixed methods design was implemented using qualitative interviews and quantitative satisfaction surveys. Interviews were conducted in February 2021 with a sample of healthcare professionals (HCPs; n = 6) who had provided multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) through an outpatient hospital pediatric chronic pain program. Satisfaction surveys were distributed to all MDT professionals employed by the clinic in April 2021 (n = 13 of 20 eligible; 65% response rate). Participants represented medicine, rehabilitation, and mental health professionals. RESULTS: Analysis of interviews generated five themes: (1) adaptation to virtual care, (2) benefits of virtual care, (3) limitations of virtual care, (4) shifting stance on virtual care over time, and (5) considerations for implementing virtual care. The satisfaction survey data revealed that respondents were able to effectively provide appropriate diagnoses, recommendations, and/or care plans for pediatric chronic pain via virtual care (n = 12, 92.3%). Detailed survey responses are presented by discipline. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a rich exploration of HCPs' experiences in providing MDT for pediatric chronic pain within a virtual care model. The current results may contribute to the future development of guidelines for virtual care delivery with pediatric chronic pain populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , Child , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Delivery of Health Care
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2253567

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of pain (i.e., pain intensity, pain interference, clinical presentation) in Long-COVID-19 patients and compare the location of pain between successfully recovered COVID-19 patients and healthy matched controls. A cross-sectional case-control study was carried out. Long-COVID-19 patients, age- and sex-matched patients with a history of COVID-19 who had successfully recovered, and healthy controls were included. Outcomes included were pain characteristics (Brief Pain Inventory and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire) and clinical presentation (Widespread Pain Index and Euroqol-5 Dimensions 5 Levels Visual Analogue Scale). Sixty-nine patients with Long-COVID-19 syndrome, sixty-six successfully recovered COVID-19 patients, and sixty-seven healthy controls were evaluated. Patients with Long-COVID-19 syndrome showed greater pain intensity and interference. In addition, they showed worse quality of life and greater widespread pain, with the most frequent locations of pain being the neck, legs, and head. In conclusion, patients with Long-COVID-19 syndrome show a high prevalence of pain, characterized by widespread pain of moderate intensity and interference, with the most frequent locations being the neck, legs, and head, significantly affecting the quality of life of these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Quality of Life , Case-Control Studies , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome
16.
Nature ; 615(7954): 765, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2249944
17.
Eur J Pain ; 27(5): 636-650, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2267352

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: New-onset chronic pain has been acknowledged as part of the post-COVID-19 condition. However, available fine-grained data about its clinical phenotype, trajectories and main associated characteristics remain scarce. We described the distinct temporal evolutions of post-COVID-19 pain and their epidemiological and phenotypical features. METHODS: A prospective cross-sectional study enrolled post-COVID-19 condition patients (i.e. who had persisting COVID-19-related symptoms over 30 days since their first positive laboratory test), whose COVID-19 diagnosis had been supported by RT-PCR of oral/nasopharyngeal swab or serology. They underwent in-person evaluations with a structured interview, pain and quality-of-life-related questionnaires and thorough physical examination. Chronic pain (CP) and probable neuropathic pain (NP) were defined according to IASP criteria. RESULTS: The present study included 226 individuals, 177 (78.3%) of whom presented over 3 months since their first COVID-19 symptom. New-onset pain occurred in 170 (75.2%) participants and was chronic in 116 (68.2%). A chronic course was associated with COVID-19-related hospitalization, new-onset fatigue, lower cognitive performance, motor and thermal sensory deficits, mood and sleep impairments and overall lower quality-of-life levels. Probable NP occurred in only 7.6% new-onset pain patients, and was associated with pain chronification, new-onset fatigue, motor and thermal sensory deficits, mechanical allodynia and lower rates of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Previous CP was reported by 86 (38.1%) individuals and had aggravated after the infection in 66 (76.7%) of them, which was associated with orthostatic hypotension. CONCLUSIONS: Post-COVID pain phenomena follow different paths, which are associated with specific clinical and epidemiological features, and possibly distinct underlying mechanisms, prognostic and therapeutic implications. SIGNIFICANCE: COVID-19-related pain usually follows a chronic course and is non-neuropathic. Its possible courses and phenotypes are associated with distinct clinical and epidemiological features. This suggests differing underlying mechanisms, which may have significant prognostic and therapeutic implications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Neuralgia , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19 Testing , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/etiology , Prospective Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , Neuralgia/epidemiology , Neuralgia/etiology
18.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 325, 2023 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255554

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic increased use of telehealth for the management of opioid use disorder and chronic non-cancer pain in primary care safety net clinical systems. Significant barriers to telehealth exist, little is known about how these barriers impact urban safety net, primary care providers and their patients. The objective of this study was to qualitatively assess the benefits and challenges of telehealth for management of chronic non-cancer pain, opioid use disorder, and multi-morbidity in primary care, safety net clinical systems. METHODS: We interviewed patients with chronic non-cancer pain and history of substance use (n = 22) and their primary care clinicians (n = 7) in the San Francisco Bay Area, March-July 2020. We recorded, transcribed, coded, and content analyzed interviews. RESULTS: COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders contributed to increases in substance use and uncontrolled pain, and posed challenges for monitoring opioid safety and misuse through telehealth. None of the clinics used video visits due to low digital literacy/access. Benefits of telehealth included decreased patient burden and missed appointments and increased convenience and control of some chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Telehealth challenges included loss of contact, greater miscommunication, and less comprehensive care interactions. CONCLUSIONS: This study is one of the first to examine telehealth use in urban safety net primary care patients with co-occurring chronic non-cancer pain and substance use. Decisions to continue or expand telehealth should consider patient burden, communication and technology challenges, pain control, opioid misuse, and medical complexity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Opioid-Related Disorders , Telemedicine , Humans , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Chronic Pain/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Opioid-Related Disorders/therapy , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Primary Health Care
19.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 124(2): 97-103, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240314

ABSTRACT

Our body senses two types of pain, acute and chronic. Acute pain lasts for a short time. It occurs when our body wants to protect us from a dangerous situation. This way, our nerves are telling us that something is wrong. But if some time passes since our injury, treatment or surgery and the pain or discomfort persists, we are speaking of chronic pain. It is often difficult to determine its intensity or even prove its existence. The discomfort and pain are not relieved and physical pain may be accompanied by mental issues. At present, during the COVID-19 pandemic, chronic pain is becoming more prominent, and it is also associated with the post-COVID syndrome. In their efforts to help patients suffering from COVID-19, many new treatment protocols have been prepared and various antiviral drugs and other potentially useful drugs have been used (often without prior approval or testing). Basically, it was a kind of 'experimental' treatment. At present, thanks to quick therapy decisions and as part of COVID-19 prevention, we have succeeded in stabilising the situation all over the world. A relatively fast development of vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 with a view to achieve collective immunity has greatly contributed to this. On the other hand, 'quick decisions' have contributed to other significant issues which we are beginning to deal with now, i.e, in the effort to defeat the virus, many experts regarded the adverse effects of the medications used to be of secondary importance. In the article we would like to point out the other side of the 'successful' treatment of COVID-19, namely the possible iatrogenic conditions which significantly contribute to the post-COVID­19 syndrome and chronic pain. The importance of preventive measures over uncertain result of COVID-19 treatment is emphasised (Tab. 4, Fig. 1, Ref. 50). Text in PDF www.elis.sk Keywords: iatrogenic conditions; chronic pain; co-morbidity; pain syndrome; pandemic; post-COVID­19 syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Chronic Pain/etiology , Chronic Pain/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19 Drug Treatment
20.
Agri ; 35(1): 48-49, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2238435
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