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1.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 124(2): 97-103, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240314

ABSTRACT

Our body senses two types of pain, acute and chronic. Acute pain lasts for a short time. It occurs when our body wants to protect us from a dangerous situation. This way, our nerves are telling us that something is wrong. But if some time passes since our injury, treatment or surgery and the pain or discomfort persists, we are speaking of chronic pain. It is often difficult to determine its intensity or even prove its existence. The discomfort and pain are not relieved and physical pain may be accompanied by mental issues. At present, during the COVID-19 pandemic, chronic pain is becoming more prominent, and it is also associated with the post-COVID syndrome. In their efforts to help patients suffering from COVID-19, many new treatment protocols have been prepared and various antiviral drugs and other potentially useful drugs have been used (often without prior approval or testing). Basically, it was a kind of 'experimental' treatment. At present, thanks to quick therapy decisions and as part of COVID-19 prevention, we have succeeded in stabilising the situation all over the world. A relatively fast development of vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 with a view to achieve collective immunity has greatly contributed to this. On the other hand, 'quick decisions' have contributed to other significant issues which we are beginning to deal with now, i.e, in the effort to defeat the virus, many experts regarded the adverse effects of the medications used to be of secondary importance. In the article we would like to point out the other side of the 'successful' treatment of COVID-19, namely the possible iatrogenic conditions which significantly contribute to the post-COVID­19 syndrome and chronic pain. The importance of preventive measures over uncertain result of COVID-19 treatment is emphasised (Tab. 4, Fig. 1, Ref. 50). Text in PDF www.elis.sk Keywords: iatrogenic conditions; chronic pain; co-morbidity; pain syndrome; pandemic; post-COVID­19 syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Chronic Pain/etiology , Chronic Pain/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19 Drug Treatment
2.
Agri ; 35(1): 48-49, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2238435
3.
J Occup Environ Med ; 65(3): e134-e140, 2023 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2246603

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between fear of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and exacerbated chronic pain among workers during the pandemic, as well as productivity loss. METHODS: We collected data using Internet-based self-reported questionnaires, on fear of COVID-19, work productivity status, exacerbation of chronic pain during the pandemic, and several confounding factors. RESULTS: The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a high level of fear of COVID-19 was associated with an increased exacerbation of chronic pain (adjusted odds ratio, 2.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-4.44). Meanwhile, the presence of fear of COVID-19 and exacerbated chronic pain were associated with productivity impairment (adjusted odds ratio, 2.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-2.85). CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that workers' fear of COVID-19 is correlated with exacerbated chronic pain and risk of presenteeism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , East Asian People , Fear , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Contemp Clin Trials ; 126: 107087, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243499

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Both preclinical studies, and more recent clinical imaging studies, suggest that glia-mediated neuroinflammation may be implicated in chronic pain, and therefore might be a potential treatment target. However, it is currently unknown whether modulating neuroinflammation effectively alleviates pain in humans. This trial tests the hypothesis that minocycline, an FDA-approved tetracycline antibiotic and effective glial cell inhibitor in animals, reduces neuroinflammation and may reduce pain symptoms in humans with chronic low back pain. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Subjects, aged 18-75, with a confirmed diagnosis of chronic (≥ six months) low back pain (cLBP) and a self-reported pain rating of at least four out of ten (for at least half of the days during an average week) are enrolled via written, informed consent. Eligible subjects are randomized to receive a 14-day course of either active drug (minocycline) or placebo. Before and after treatment, subjects are scanned with integrated Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) using [11C]PBR28, a second-generation radiotracer for the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), which is highly expressed in glial cells and thus a putative marker of neuroinflammation. Pain levels are evaluated via daily surveys, collected seven days prior to the start of medication, and throughout the 14 days of treatment. General linear models will be used to assess pain levels and determine the treatment effect on brain (and spinal cord) TSPO signal. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT03106740).


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Low Back Pain , Humans , Low Back Pain/diagnostic imaging , Low Back Pain/drug therapy , Minocycline/therapeutic use , Neuroinflammatory Diseases , Chronic Pain/diagnostic imaging , Chronic Pain/drug therapy , Double-Blind Method , Treatment Outcome , Receptors, GABA/metabolism , Receptors, GABA/therapeutic use , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
5.
BMJ Open ; 13(2): e066577, 2023 02 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230370

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Previous qualitative and cross-sectional research has identified a strong sense of mental defeat in people with chronic pain who also experience the greatest levels of distress and disability. This study will adopt a longitudinal experience sampling design to examine the within-person link between the sense of mental defeat and distress and disability associated with chronic pain. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We aim to recruit 198 participants (aged 18-65 years) with chronic pain, to complete two waves of experience sampling over 1 week, 6 months apart (time 1 and time 2). During each wave of experience sampling, the participants are asked to complete three short online surveys per day, to provide in-the-moment ratings of mental defeat, pain, medication usage, physical and social activity, stress, mood, self-compassion, and attention using visual analogue scales. Sleep and physical activity will be measured using a daily diary as well as with wrist actigraphy worn continuously by participants throughout each wave. Linear mixed models and Gaussian graphical models will be fit to the data to: (1) examine the within-person, day-to-day association of mental defeat with outcomes (ie, pain, physical/social activity, medication use and sleep), (2) examine the dynamic temporal and contemporaneous networks of mental defeat with all outcomes and the hypothesised mechanisms of outcomes (ie, perceived stress, mood, attention and self-compassion). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The current protocol has been approved by the Health Research Authority and West Midlands-Solihull Research Ethics Committee (Reference Number: 17/WM0053). The study is being conducted in adherence with the Declaration of Helsinki, Warwick Standard Operating Procedures and applicable UK legislation.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Humans , Chronic Pain/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ecological Momentary Assessment , Surveys and Questionnaires , Exercise
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(4)2023 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2234849

ABSTRACT

The ongoing pandemic of COVID-19 has caused more than 6.7 million tragic deaths, plus, a large percentage of people who survived it present a myriad of chronic symptoms that last for at least 6 months; this has been named as long COVID. Some of the most prevalent are painful symptoms like headache, joint pain, migraine, neuropathic-like pain, fatigue and myalgia. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate genes, and their involvement in several pathologies has been extensively shown. A deregulation of miRNAs has been observed in patients with COVID-19. The objective of the present systematic review was to show the prevalence of chronic pain-like symptoms of patients with long COVID and based on the expression of miRNAs in patients with COVID-19, and to present a proposal on how they may be involved in the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic pain-like symptoms. A systematic review was carried out in online databases for original articles published between March 2020 to April 2022; the systematic review followed the PRISMA guidelines, and it was registered in PROSPERO with registration number CRD42022318992. A total of 22 articles were included for the evaluation of miRNAs and 20 regarding long COVID; the overall prevalence of pain-like symptoms was around 10 to 87%, plus, the miRNAs that were commonly up and downregulated were miR-21-5p, miR-29a,b,c-3p miR-92a,b-3p, miR-92b-5p, miR-126-3p, miR-150-5p, miR-155-5p, miR-200a, c-3p, miR-320a,b,c,d,e-3p, and miR-451a. The molecular pathways that we hypothesized to be modulated by these miRNAs are the IL-6/STAT3 proinflammatory axis and the compromise of the blood-nerve barrier; these two mechanisms could be associated with the prevalence of fatigue and chronic pain in the long COVID population, plus they could be novel pharmacological targets in order to reduce and prevent these symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , MicroRNAs , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Humans , Chronic Pain/genetics , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome/genetics
7.
Psychosom Med ; 83(6): 497-502, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191186

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: We are at a difficult time in history with societal increases in stress, loneliness, and psychopathology, along with high rates of obesity, sedentary lifestyles, and chronic pain. Mindfulness interventions offer promise to address these societal issues. However, in order to make best use of the opportunities revealed by our current challenges, we must: (1) tackle these issues head-on with inclusive, innovative, and creative experimental designs and interventions, and (2) collectively adhere to rigorous, high quality methods so as to provide an evidence-based integration of mindfulness interventions into mainstream medicine and public health.We find there are several areas for which important advances are happening, including sampling socially diverse populations, examining mechanisms of action, pain management, and health behaviors. Furthermore, rigorous methods, including measurement, causal inference from control groups, delivery and scalability of mindfulness interventions, and effect modifiers to determine who mindfulness programs work best for are also gaining traction. This special issue on Mindfulness: Biobehavioral Mechanisms and Health Outcomes attends to many of these issues, several of which are highlighted in this editorial perspective.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Meditation , Mindfulness , Humans , Pain Management , Pandemics
8.
Pain Physician ; 25(9): E1405-E1413, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2169618

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain symptoms are distressing conditions that necessitate regular visits to  pain therapists and may require interventions, however, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused patients and their therapists to limit both visits and interventions with the transition to telehealth, with little or no preparation or training. This has resulted in the extensive use of over-the counter analgesia and corticosteroids. OBJECTIVES: Our study aimed to evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the rates of counseling and interventional pain management therapies (IPMT), and determine the effects of implementing an infection control program (ICP) and mandating personal protective equipment (PPE) on these rates. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective multicenter survey, based on an online self-assessed questionnaire. SETTING: Departments of Anesthesia, Pain, Intensive Care Unit, Physical Medicine, Rheumatology, and  Rehabilitation at Egyptian University hospitals. METHODS: A self-assessed questionnaire was uploaded on Google forms and links were sent to enrolled therapists with an identification number to allow self-administration and privacy. Feedback was analyzed by 2 authors who were blinded to the identity of the responders. RESULTS: A total of 57.9% of responders increased their patients' contact by phone and video conference. Within 1-4 months after the outbreak began, 59% stopped in-person contact and 38.2% stopped their IPM practice. Prescriptions of analgesics and oral steroids increased by about 50%. The majority of responders complained of a shortage of ventilation appliances in their workplaces. About 50% of them always use ICP, 85% use surgical masks, 61% use gloves, and 45% wear gowns when meeting with patients. After the application of PPE, 45.5% of responders increased their consultation rate and 40% increased their rate of IPMT. LIMITATIONS: This study is limited to being a national study, and so lacked comparative data. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 outbreak seriously affected the rates of in-person consultations and IPMT for patients with chronic pain and increased the rates of consumption of analgesia and oral steroids. Most responders reported a shortage of PPE especially ventilation appliances in workplaces. A high percentage of responders lack interest in ICP and PPE, despite the positive effects of its application on consultation and IPMT rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Pain Management , Pandemics/prevention & control , Chronic Pain/therapy , Prospective Studies , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Personal Protective Equipment
9.
Trials ; 23(1): 1031, 2022 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Various psychological issues and serious health concerns during the imposed lockdown by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have induced many changes in the treatment of patients. More effective self-management strategies through tele-rehabilitation are suggested to be applied for patients with chronic neck pain to reduce referrals to health cares and disability support through COVID-19. Also, the pain neuroscience education (PNE) approach is an educational method used by health professionals to assist patients in understanding the biology, physiology, and psychosocial factors affecting their pain experience and aligning with the cognitions and beliefs associated with pain and recurrent disability. PNE combined with tele-rehabilitation could be a new solution to encourage patients to manage their condition by themselves and increase the continuity of practice instead of face-to-face sessions. OBJECTIVE: This randomized control trial (RCT) aims to investigate the effects of PNE with online and face-to-face exercise interventions, and the control group received biomedical education + standardized physical therapy on neck pain and disability, psychological factors, and function in non-traumatic chronic neck pain. METHODS/DESIGN: Patients with non-traumatic chronic neck pain (patient-centered care and active involvement of patients and the public) will be recruited via flyers displayed in hospitals and universities to participate in an RCT with two experimental and one control group designed to investigate the effects of PNE with online and face-to-face exercise interventions, and the control group received biomedical education + standardized physical therapy on neck pain and disability, psychological factors, and function in non-traumatic chronic neck pain. The outcomes will be measured at baseline, after PNE, and after 3 months of an exercise intervention. All outcomes are presented as mean ± SD, and statistical significance was set at α level of < 0.05. The normal distribution of the variables was verified by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, following a descriptive analysis. DISCUSSION: It seems that PNE plus online and face-to-face exercise interventions are appropriate educational models for the treatment of patients with neck pain during COVID-19. Also, online training seems to encourage patients to continue their treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials IRCT20150503022068N5. Registered on 09 September 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , Neck Pain/diagnosis , Neck Pain/therapy , Control Groups , Communicable Disease Control , Chronic Pain/diagnosis , Chronic Pain/therapy , Physical Therapy Modalities/education , Exercise Therapy/adverse effects , Exercise Therapy/methods , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
10.
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract ; 35(1): 12-20, 2023 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190962

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Drug overdose deaths greatly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, with 100,306 cases occurring in the United States over 12 months from 2020 to 2021, an increase of 28.5% from the year before. Three quarters of these deaths involved opioids, and this epidemic has seriously complicated chronic pain management. The role of nurse practitioners (NPs) in opioid prescription has expanded since Affordable Care Act passage in 2010, but their prescription of opioids for chronic pain management is not well understood. OBJECTIVES: This integrative review aimed to identify barriers, facilitators, and other factors influencing NPs' management of chronic pain with opioids. DATA SOURCES: Five databases were searched for the highest level of evidence in articles published from 2011 to 2021. Search results were refined to focus on NPs' chronic pain management via opioid prescription. CONCLUSIONS: Nine studies were selected for the review. Six identified themes were indicative of barriers, facilitators, and other factors affecting NPs' opioid management: nurse practitioner education, patient subjectivity and patient education, systemic change and alternative treatment access, interprofessional collaboration, nurse practitioner prescriptive authority, and practice environment. States and schools of nursing should modify policy and curricula to better support NPs' opioid management and reduce associated prescription barriers. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: NPs' opioid management can best be improved by providing them with current guideline-based education regarding opioid prescription, emphasizing patient education, supplying NPs with systemic support, encouraging interprofessional collaboration, and solving the prescriptive authority issues. Enhancing NPs' opioid prescription and chronic pain management knowledge would help to mitigate the opioid epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Nurse Practitioners , Humans , United States , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Chronic Pain/drug therapy , Pandemics , Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act , Nurse Practitioners/education
11.
researchsquare; 2023.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-2488709.v1

ABSTRACT

Background: The ongoing opioid epidemic and rising number of patients with chronic pain have highlighted the need for alternative and integrative pain management approaches. A number of evidence-based nonpharmacologic pain management strategies are available; however, these approaches remain underutilized due to barriers such as time limitations, cost, and lack of clinician training. The aim of this work was to implement a nonpharmacologic pain coach educator program that addresses these barriers. We report an evaluation of the first year of program implementation in the emergency department of a large safety-net hospital. Methods:We implemented a multimodal pain coach educator program that included education on pain neuroscience and over-the-counter analgesic options, demonstration of integrative techniques, and nonpharmacologic toolkits for home use. Implementation strategies included electronic health record tools, training and promotion, clinical champions, and clinician recognition. We used the RE-AIM framework to guide evaluation of the first year of program implementation using data from the electronic health record, quantitative and qualitative program records, and patient-reported outcomes. Results:In the first year of program implementation 550 pain coach educator sessions were conducted. Upon immediate session completion, 61% of patients felt the program was helpful, 39% were unsure at the time, and none reported session was not helpful. Clinician feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Program cost per patient was $344.35. Adaptations to first year intervention and implementation strategies included modifications of session delivery timing for accommodation of clinical workflows, additions to program content to align with patient characteristics, and changes to patient identification strategies in response to the coronavirus 19 pandemic. Conclusions:The PAMI pain coach educator program provides a model for nonpharmacologic pain management programs which can be scaled up and adapted for other settings. This work demonstrates the importance of intervention and implementation strategy adaptations to enhance program reach and effectiveness.


Subject(s)
Pain , Chronic Pain
12.
researchsquare; 2023.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-2454874.v1

ABSTRACT

Background Mental health problems and chronic health conditions cause significant productivity loss in the workplace. Chronic pain and mental health care needs in Canada that existed before COVID-19 remain unmet and have been exacerbated by the pandemic. The Alberta Societal Health Integration Program (ABSHIP) proposes an innovative community-based model in which Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) services are provided to help achieve social recovery and improve economic participation. Methods Participants will receive CAM treatment in two modes: a minimum of two acupuncture treatment sessions per week for up to a total of 12 treatments, and voluntary Qigong exercise. The study will recruit 150 participants between the ages of 14 and 55 who are suffering from pain or mental health issues that are causing severe productivity loss. Primary outcome indicators are productivity (WPAI), pain (BPI), quality of sleep (PSQI), depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), anger (DAR-5), quality of life (EQ-5D-5L) and substance use (DAST-10 & CAGE). Secondary outcome indicators include general health care utilization, which will be measured by patients’ self-reported inpatient, outpatient, emergency department, and prescription drug utilization. Data will be collected at baseline (before treatment) and after the sixth and twelfth session (post-treatment) to measure short-term outcomes of the study. To understand the long-term impact of ABSHIP, participants will be invited to take the same survey three and six months after completing the program. Discussion ABSHIP is a first-of-its-kind study that provides CAM integrated interventions to enhance pain management, as well as protecting and fostering psychosocial well-being and resilience in children, adolescents, and seniors. The successful completion of the project will result in cost savings as well as significant evidence to aid instrument policy in the short and long run. Trial Registration This interventional study involving human participants, has been approved by the University of Calgary (UofC) Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board (CHREB) (ethics ID: REB 21-2050).


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders , Chronic Pain , Pain , Depressive Disorder , COVID-19
13.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0275680, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140579

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding of the role social factors play in chronic pain is growing, with more adaptive and satisfying social relationships helping pain management. During the COVID-19 pandemic, social distancing measures facilitated a naturalistic study of how changes to social interaction affected chronic pain intensity. METHODS: In a cross-sectional correlational design, questionnaire data was collected over a 38-day period during the March 2020 COVID-19 lockdown, individuals with chronic pain were asked about their current pain experience as well as notable social factors which might relate to pain. RESULTS: Multiple regression analysis revealed social satisfaction significantly predicted pain experience, with a reduction in social participation during COVID-19 lockdowns increasing pain disability, and increased social satisfaction associated with decreasing pain intensity. CONCLUSIONS: While pain management often focuses on the functional aspects of pain alleviation, these findings suggest psychological aspects of socialising satisfaction also impact pain experience. Pain management strategies should consider ways to increase social satisfaction in individuals with chronic pain, perhaps by facilitating socialisation in the home using remote communication methods similar to those which became popular during the COVID-19 lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , Physical Distancing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control
14.
Wiad Lek ; 75(9 pt 2): 2262-2269, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117502

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim: To evaluate an influence of physical therapy on chronic pain in children with paralytic's syndrome and to maternal emotional status on lockdown time during the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and methods: Data from 96 children and their mothers (96 persons) were included in the study. On-site services of physical therapists before the pandemic (2018- 2019) were received by 64 children and by 32 children during quarantine measures due to COVID-19 pandemic (2020). The age of the children ranged from 1 to 6 years, the median age was 3 years and 3 months. RESULTS: Results: We note that there were more boys with paralytic syndromes. Among the leading paralytic syndromes, the most common was spastic tetraparesis. The frequency of children with level III-V motor disorders prevailed. CONCLUSION: Conclusions: The authors consider that physical rehabilitation in children with paralytic syndromes reduces the incidence of moderate chronic pain and improves the emotional state of parents. But, these changes do not occur during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Child , Male , Female , Humans , Child, Preschool , Infant , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Physical Therapy Modalities
15.
Mo Med ; 119(3): 229-236, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2112080

ABSTRACT

Synopsis Patients with non-cancer pain reported increased pain and pain interference during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic. We determined if pain, prescription opioid use, and comorbidities were associated with perceived COVID-19-related stress as the pandemic peaked. Analysis of survey data revealed that depression/anxiety, pain severity, and pain interference were most strongly and consistently associated with greater stress due to COVID-19 related changes in lifestyle, worsening of emotional/mental health and worsening pain. Identifying specific stressful experiences that most impacted patients with non-cancer pain may help target public health and treatment interventions. Background: During the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with chronic pain reported increased pain severity and interference. This study measured the association between pain, prescription opioid use, and comorbidities with perceived COVID-19-related stress as the pandemic peaked in the United States. Methods: From 9/2020 to 3/2021, the first 149 subjects from a prospective cohort study of non-cancer pain, completed a survey which contained the Complementary and Integrative Research (CAIR) Pandemic Impact Questionnaire (C-PIQ). Respondents also reported whether the pandemic has contributed to their pain or opioid use. Bivariate comparisons explored patient characteristics with each CAIR domain. Results: Respondents mean age was 54.6 (±11.3) years, 69.8% were female, 64.6% were White. Respondent characteristics were not associated with reading/watching/thinking about the pandemic or with worry about health. Depression/anxiety (p=0.003), using any prescription opioid in the prior three months (p=0.009), higher morphine milligram equivalent used (p=0.005), higher pain severity (p=0.011), and higher pain interference (p=0.0004) were all positively and significantly associated with moderate to severe stress due to COVID-19 related lifestyle changes. Depression/anxiety, pain severity, and pain interference were positively associated with COVID-19-related worsening emotional/mental health. Depression/anxiety were significantly (p<0.0001) associated with reporting that the pandemic made their pain worse. Conclusion: Depression, anxiety, pain severity, and pain interference were most strongly and consistently associated with COVID-19 changes in way of life, worsening of emotional/mental health, and worsening pain. Identifying specific stressful experiences that most impacted patients with noncancer pain may inform public health and treatment interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Analgesics, Opioid , Depression , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
16.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0275095, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098741

ABSTRACT

Using data from all those born in a single week in 1958 in Britain we track associations between short pain and chronic pain in mid-life (age 44) and subsequent health, wellbeing and labor market outcomes in later life. We focus on data taken at age 50 in 2008, when the Great Recession hit and then five years later at age 55 in 2013 and again at age 62 in 2021 during the Covid pandemic. We find those suffering both short-term and chronic pain at age 44 continue to report pain and poor general health in their 50s and 60s. However, the associations are much stronger for those with chronic pain. Furthermore, chronic pain at age 44 is associated with a range of poor mental health outcomes, pessimism about the future and joblessness at age 55 whereas short-duration pain at age 44 is not. Pain has strong predictive power for pain later in life: pain in childhood predicts pain in mid-life, even when one controls for pain in early adulthood. Pain appears to reflect other vulnerabilities as we find that chronic pain at age 44 predicts whether or not a respondent has Covid nearly twenty years later.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Adult , Humans , Middle Aged , Child Development , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Unemployment
17.
Pain Physician ; 25(6): 427-439, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2092757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 quarantine measures have created new challenges in the delivery of medical care, especially in the realm of medical and interventional chronic pain management. This study evaluated the effect of COVID-19 social distancing and quarantine measures on symptoms of pain and anxiety, as well as substance abuse and health care engagement in patients with chronic pain and the role of the clinic's virtual assessment initiatives in managing these patients. METHODS: A 24-question cross-sectional survey was conducted with patients with chronic pain seen at the Montefiore Medical Center Comprehensive Pain Clinic from June 2020 through July 2020. The survey was administered to 552 high-utilizer patients via telephone, evaluating domains such as pain, anxiety, substance use, and health care engagement. The questions were quantitively assessed on a Likert scale or a numerical rating scale. We used descriptive statistics to report our results. RESULTS: Of the 1,023 patients identified as high utilizers of the pain clinic, 552 patients participated in the survey. The median (25th-75th percentile) pain score reported was 7 (5-9) for all responders. Approximately 50% of the patients reported that they were anxious about their pain and somewhat or very concerned that their pain would be uncontrolled during the pandemic. Further, the severity of the pain reported was associated with sleep, appetite, and mood changes. In our cohort, 95% of all patients denied using alcohol, 92% denied using marijuana, and 98% denied using other recreational drugs to manage their pain during the pandemic. In addition, just more than three-fourths (79%) of all patients reported needing to speak with their health care provider during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The survey conducted among high-utilizers demonstrated that patients who remained engaged with their health care team reported minimal concerns regarding chronic pain and associated symptoms during the COVID-19 quarantine period. In addition, the early implementation of virtual consults in the pain clinic may have contributed to mitigating patient concerns. Finally, the study also identified the importance of outreach and patient education on the availability and utilization of telemedicine services. Consequently, it is reasonable to implement virtual assessments and visits alongside other education outreach methods to engage patients with chronic pain who frequently utilize chronic pain health care resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Illicit Drugs , Telemedicine , Chronic Pain/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics
18.
Pain Physician ; 25(5): 387-390, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2092264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a novel challenge for healthcare delivery and implementation in the United States (US) in 2020 and beyond. Telemedicine arose as a significant and effective medium for safe and efficacious physician-patient interactions. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine while available, had infrequently been utilized in pain medicine practices due to difficulties with reimbursement, the learning curve associated with new technology usage, and the need for new logistical systems in place to implement telemedicine effectively. Given the unique constraints on the healthcare system during the COVID-19 pandemic, the ubiquitous utilization of telemedicine among pain medicine physicians increased, giving insight into potential future roles for the technology beyond the pandemic. OBJECTIVES: To survey and understand the state of implementation of telemedicine into pain medicine practices across practice settings and geographical areas; to identify potential barriers to the implementation of telemedicine in pain medicine practice; and to identify the likelihood of telemedicine continuing beyond the pandemic in pain medicine practice. STUDY DESIGN: Online questionnaire targeting Pain Medicine physicians in the US. Participants were asked questions related to the use of telemedicine during the first peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. SETTING: Online-based questionnaire distributed to academic and private practice pain medicine physicians nationally in the United States. METHODS: A 34 web-based questionnaires were distributed by the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and the Society of Interventional Spine to all active members. Data were analyzed using SAS v9.4. RESULTS: Between December 3, 2020, and February 18, 2021, 164 participants accessed the survey with a response rate of 14.3%. Overall, academic physicians were more likely to implement telemedicine than private practice physicians. Telemedicine was also more frequently utilized for follow-up appointments rather than initial visits. LIMITATIONS: Although our n = 164, the overall low response rate of 14.3% warrants further investigation into the utilization of telemedicine throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine as an emerging technology for efficient communication played a key role in mitigating the adverse effects of the COVID -19 pandemic on chronic pain patients. The utilization of telemedicine remarkably increased after the start of the pandemic within 1 to 2 weeks. Overall, private hospital-based centers were significantly less likely to implement telemedicine than academic centers, possibly due to limited access to secure telemedicine platforms and high start-up costs. Telemedicine was used more frequently for follow-up visits than initial visit encounters at most centers. In spite of the unforeseen consequences to the healthcare system and chronic pain practices in the US from COVID-19, telehealth has emerged as a unique model of care for patients with chronic pain. Although it has flaws, telehealth has the ability to increase access to care beyond the end of the pandemic. Further identification of barriers to the use of telemedicine platforms in private practices should be addressed from a policy perspective to facilitate increased care access.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Telemedicine , Analgesics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , United States
19.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0273667, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089397

ABSTRACT

The magnitude of the cost of chronic pain has been a matter of concern in many countries worldwide. The high prevalence, the cost it implies for the health system, productivity, and absenteeism need to be addressed urgently. Studies have begun describing this problem in Chile, but there is still a debt in highlighting its importance and urgency on contributing to chronic pain financial coverage. This study objective is to estimate the expected cost of chronic pain and its related musculoskeletal diseases in the Chilean adult population. We conducted a mathematical decision model exercise, Markov Model, to estimate costs and consequences. Patients were classified into severe, moderate, and mild pain groups, restricted to five diseases: knee osteoarthritis, hip osteoarthritis, lower back pain, shoulder pain, and fibromyalgia. Data analysis considered a set of transition probabilities to estimate the total cost, sick leave payment, and productivity losses. Results show that the total annual cost for chronic pain in Chile is USD 943,413,490, corresponding an 80% to the five diseases studied. The highest costs are related to therapeutic management, followed by productivity losses and sick leave days. Low back pain and fibromyalgia are both the costlier chronic pain-related musculoskeletal diseases. We can conclude that the magnitude of the cost in our country's approach to chronic pain is related to increased productivity losses and sick leave payments. Incorporating actions to ensure access and financial coverage and new care strategies that reorganize care delivery to more integrated and comprehensive care could potentially impact costs in both patients and the health system. Finally, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic will probably deepen even more this problem.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Fibromyalgia , Low Back Pain , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Adult , Humans , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Chile/epidemiology , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sick Leave , Low Back Pain/therapy , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Costs and Cost Analysis , Chronic Disease
20.
Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol ; 15(12): 1377-1382, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087632

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic had remarkable effects on psychological distress. The main stressors were prolonged quarantine and social isolation, fear of infection and death, stigmatization, infodemic, financial difficulties, and job loss. These negative stressors, which affect mental and physical health, make people more vulnerable to nocebo-related risk behaviors. We aimed to summarize data on nocebo behaviors, such as the negative psychological consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of how people perceive and interpret medical services and treatments. AREAS COVERED: Limited data were found from randomized controlled trials with SARS-CoV-2 vaccines and from surveys on healthy people, healthcare workers, and patients with chronic pain disorders. EXPERT OPINION: Studies have shown nocebo effects among participants in SARS-CoV-2 vaccines trials, among patients with chronic pain, and among healthcare workers. These effects were widely amplified during the pandemic era, prefiguring a 'nocebodemic effect' to describe the massive negative interpretation of health services and medical treatments. Greater awareness of these findings could reduce the impact of the 'nocebodemic effect' and increase public trust in science.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Nocebo Effect , COVID-19 Vaccines
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