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1.
Stem Cell Res Ther ; 12(1): 539, 2021 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854868

ABSTRACT

Allergic diseases are immune-mediated diseases. Allergies share a common immunopathogenesis, with specific differences according to the specific disease. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been applied to people suffering from allergic and many other diseases. In this review, the immunologic roles of MSCs are systemically reviewed according to disease immunopathogenesis from a clinical viewpoint. MSCs seem to be a promising therapeutic modality not only as symptomatic treatments but also as causative and even preventive treatments for allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis and chronic urticaria.


Subject(s)
Chronic Urticaria , Dermatitis, Atopic , Hypersensitivity , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Dermatitis, Atopic/therapy , Humans
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 751579, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775937

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Night shift work is common in the current working environment and is a risk factor for many diseases. The study aimed to explore the relationship between night shift work with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), and the modification effect of circadian dysfunction on it. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among Chinese workers. Exposure was measured by night work history and duration. Circadian dysfunction was characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). The diagnosis of CSU was made by dermatologists who were investigating on the spot. The effect size was expressed as odds ratios (ORs). Results: A total of 8,057 participants were recruited, and 7,411 (92%) with complete information were included in the final analyses. The prevalence rates of CSU for workers without night shift and those with night shift history were 0.73 and 1.28%, respectively. Compared with workers who never worked night shifts, the risk of CSU increased with the length of night shift work: OR = 1.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-3.06) for duration <5 years and OR = 1.91 (95% CI: 1.12-3.26) for duration ≥5 years. EDS s EDS has been shown to modify this combination. Among workers without EDS, there was no association between night shift and CSU (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.49-1.79). Whereas, in participants with EDS, the correlation was significant (OR = 3.58; 95% CI: 1.14-11.20). However, the effect modification by sleep disturbance was not observed. Conclusions: Night shift work is a risk factor for CSU, and there is a dose-response relationship between night shift work hours and the risk of CSU. This connection may be modified by circadian dysfunction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Urticaria , Shift Work Schedule , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Shift Work Schedule/adverse effects , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/epidemiology , Work Schedule Tolerance
3.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol ; 183(6): 651-661, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673574

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The role of autoimmunity and other preexisting risky conditions in hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to COVID-19 vaccines seems unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the autoimmunity and preexisting risky conditions in HSRs to COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: The patients aged ≥18 years with a history of HSR to CoronaVac or Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines within 24 h in 2 tertiary centers were assessed. The patients were divided according to the type of vaccine which they showed immediate-type (<4 h) HSR to (group A1 for CoronaVac and group B1 for Pfizer-BioNTech). Equal number of subjects who did not show HSR to two doses of either CoronaVac or Pfizer-BioNTech was recruited into the study as control groups (group A2 for CoronaVac and group B2 for Pfizer-BioNTech). The autologous serum skin test (ASST) was performed on patient and control groups. Later, the demographic, clinical, and laboratory features were compared between groups. RESULTS: A total number of 27 patients were included in the study. Subjects with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) were more frequent in group B1 than in group B2 (p:0.041). In addition to CSU, the presence of HSRs to drugs was higher in group A1 than in A2 (both p:0.007). The presence of autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases, positivity of antithyroid peroxidase antibody, and ASST were less in group A2 than in A1 (p:0.015, p:0.048, p:0.048, and p:0.037). Additionally, COVID-19 infection history was less in group A2 than in A1 (p:0.037). DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: Type IIb autoimmunity seems to play a role in immediate type HSRs to the CoronaVac vaccine as previously shown in autoimmune CSU and multidrug hypersensitivity.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 , Chronic Urticaria , Hypersensitivity , Adolescent , Adult , Autoimmunity , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans
4.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 43(1): 30-36, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606330

ABSTRACT

Background: The factors that trigger and exacerbate chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) are well known, but it is not unclear whether messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 can trigger new cases of CSU or a relapse of CSU after long-term remission. Objective: To study the clinical cases of patients with new-onset CSU and CSU in remission who relapsed within 3 months after BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination. Methods: All patients with a CSU diagnosis within 12 weeks of BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination were retrospectively identified and included in the new-onset CSU and the relapsed CSU groups. The first control group (CSU control group) retrospectively consisted of patients diagnosed with CSU in complete clinical remission for ≥ 6 months, with no CSU relapse after vaccination. The second control group (healthy control group) consisted of subjects who were fully vaccinated and without CSU, matched 1:2 for age and sex with patients with CSU. Results: Twenty-seven patients were included in the relapsed CSU group, 32 patients in the new-onset CSU group, 179 patients in the CSU control group, and 476 subjects in the healthy control group. The relapsed CSU and new-onset CSU groups had more allergic comorbidities overall (19 [70.4%] and 13 [40.6%], respectively) than the CSU control group and the healthy control group (50 [27.9%] and 110 [23.1%], respectively; p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a positive autologous serum skin test result, overall allergic comorbidities, and basopenia were positively associated with the probability of CSU relapse within 3 months after BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination (odds ratio [OR] 5.54 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 2.36-13.02], p < 0.001); OR 6.13 [95% CI, 2.52-14.89], p = 0.001; and OR 2.81 [95% CI, 1.17-6.72, p = 0.020, respectively). Conclusion: It is possible that BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination serves as a provoking and/or relapsing factor of CSU in individuals with allergic diseases and/or predisposed autoimmunity.


Subject(s)
/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Chronic Urticaria , COVID-19/prevention & control , Case-Control Studies , Chronic Urticaria/chemically induced , Humans , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Vaccination/adverse effects
5.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(2): 431-434, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605856

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Omalizumab (OMZ) is a monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody used in patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). The data about using OMZ during the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of having COVID-19 and relationships between COVID-19, vaccination, and urticaria symptoms of CSU patients on OMZ. METHOD: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 36 adult CSU patients treated with OMZ. Demographic data, the results of COVID-19 real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and vaccination status were recorded from the electronic medical records. RESULTS: Thirty-six patients, 23 women, and 13 men were evaluated. The mean age was 45.81 years. Two patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 while using OMZ. Four patients interrupted their OMZ treatment during the pandemic, and OMZ treatments were restarted in all patients. There were 28 patients who had at least one dose of vaccine (inactive and/or mRNA vaccine). Only one patient had an urticaria exacerbation after the first dose of mRNA vaccine. CONCLUSION: As a result, our findings have shown that omalizumab treatment in CSU patients during the COVID-19 pandemic does not increase the risk of COVID-19 infection and omalizumab can be used safely.


Subject(s)
Anti-Allergic Agents , COVID-19 , Chronic Urticaria , Omalizumab , Adult , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines , Chronic Disease , Chronic Urticaria/complications , Chronic Urticaria/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Omalizumab/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Vaccines, Synthetic
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 722406, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497073

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically disrupts health care for patients with chronic diseases including chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). As of now, it is unknown if the effects of the pandemic in CSU are different than in other chronic diseases. We also do not know, if different groups of CSU patients, for example female and male patients, are affected differently. Aim: To understand how CSU patients and subgroups are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in their disease activity and control and treatment, using psoriasis as control. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 399 patients (450 visits) with CSU or psoriasis assessed during August 2019, i.e. before the pandemic, or August 2020, i.e. during the pandemic, for changes in disease activity, disease control, and the treatment they used, and how these changes are linked to age, gender, and disease duration. Results: Male but not female patients with CSU had markedly increased disease activity during the pandemic. CSU patients' age or disease duration were not linked to changes. Male and female patients with psoriasis showed similar increases in disease activity and decreases in disease control. The rate of omalizumab treatment, during the pandemic, was unchanged in male patients and increased in female patients with CSU. The efficacy of omalizumab treatment, during the pandemic, was reduced in male patients but not female patients with CSU. Conclusion: Male but not female CSU patients, during the COVID-19 pandemic, show loss of disease control linked to loss of omalizumab efficacy. The reasons for this need to be investigated.


Subject(s)
Chronic Urticaria/drug therapy , Adult , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Omalizumab/therapeutic use , Pandemics/prevention & control , Treatment Outcome
7.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 20(11): 3369-3375, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443297

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is defined as recurrent attacks of urticaria present for more than six weeks. The monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, was approved for the treatment of CSU in patients who remain refractory to H1-antihistamines. Biologic agents are shown not to increase the risk of COVID-19 infection in different studies. OBJECTIVE: In the present study, we aimed to determine the prevalance of COVID-19 infection in relation to the age, gender, presence of other comorbidities, and treatment given for CSU. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of 233 patients diagnosed with CSU in a tertiary referral hospital. Demographical data, treatment given for CSU, the presence of COVID-19-related symptoms, history of close contact to a person with COVID-19 and COVID-19 real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results were determined via a telephone survey and checked from medical data records. RESULTS: One hundred sixty patients were female; whereas 73 were male. The mean age was 44.76. Out of 233 patients with chronic urticaria, 125 had symptoms related to COVID-19 infection. RT-PCR testing for COVID-19 was performed in 156 patients. Of 156 patients with COVID-19 RT-PCR test, RT-PCR result was positive in 15 cases. CONCLUSIONS: No statistically significant relationship was found between COVID-19 RT-PCR positivity and the type of treatment administered for chronic urticaria when the patients are divided into omalizumab ± oral antihistamines and only oral antihistamines treatment groups (p = 0.150). Omalizumab seems to be safe in the era of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Allergic Agents , COVID-19 , Chronic Urticaria , Histamine Antagonists , Omalizumab , Adult , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Chronic Disease , Chronic Urticaria/drug therapy , Chronic Urticaria/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Histamine Antagonists/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Omalizumab/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
8.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 42(4): e107-e115, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435924

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) related mental health status on chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) has not been addressed before. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the depression, anxiety and stress levels, and the fear of COVID-19 in patients with mild-to-moderate CSU and to determine their impact on urticaria activity during the pandemic. Methods: A total of 509 patients with mild-to-moderate CSU were prospectively evaluated with validated scales, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21) and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) during the lockdown period (LP) and the return to normal period (RTNP). CSU activity was determined with the urticaria activity score summed over 7 days (UAS7) and medication scores (MS). UAS7 and MS before the pandemic were retrospectively collected from medical records. Results: The median UAS7 and MS were both significantly higher in the LP than in the median of related scores during the prepandemic period (p < 0.0001) and the RTNP (p < 0.0001). The mean FCV-19S and DASS-21 scores were both significantly higher in the LP than in the RTNP (p < 0.0001). The FCV-19S and the DASS-21 anxiety and stress subscales were significantly higher in women. The UAS7s were positively correlated with the FCV-19S and depression, anxiety, and stress subscale scores. Conclusion: Fear of COVID-19, anxiety, depression, and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially when strict isolation measures are taken, have a significant impact on mental health and urticaria activity in patients with mild-to-moderate CSU, even though they are not infected. Psychological support for patients with CSU seems to be important to control disease activity during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Chronic Urticaria/psychology , Cost of Illness , Mental Health , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Chronic Urticaria/diagnosis , Chronic Urticaria/epidemiology , Chronic Urticaria/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
Dermatol Ther ; 34(1): e14652, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966494

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak significantly affected the clinical practice in hospitals and the management of many diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pandemic-related factors on the severity and course of chronic urticaria (CU). A total of 194 CU patients who were on regular follow-up, were enrolled in the study. The disease activity was assessed by means of the weekly urticaria activity score (UAS7) and urticaria control test (UCT). Patients were divided into two subgroups according to their disease aggravation as "aggravated" and "non-aggravated". Two groups were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, COVID-19-associated parameters, and parameters related with the effect of COVID-19 pandemic on CU management. The omalizumab use was statistically higher (P = .017), and the systemic corticosteroid use was statistically lower (P = .025) in the "aggravated" group. Adherence to quarantine was significantly lower in the "aggravated" group (P = .027). 173 patients (89.2%) were unable to contact a dermatologist during the pandemic. Among 186 patients who received treatment for CU before the pandemic, 48 (25.8%) did not continue the existing treatment during the pandemic. CU aggravated in one patient with COVID-19 and remained stable in the other. This study showed that CU patients, especially those on omalizumab therapy, had difficulties in attending medical care and even in the maintenance of their existing therapies during the pandemic. Creating novel follow-up and treatment models as well as the increased use of teledermatology might be beneficial in the management of this life-disturbing condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Urticaria , Urticaria , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Chronic Disease , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Omalizumab/therapeutic use , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology , Urticaria/diagnosis , Urticaria/drug therapy , Urticaria/epidemiology , Urticaria/etiology
15.
Allergy ; 76(3): 816-830, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960768

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically disrupts health care around the globe. The impact of the pandemic on chronic urticaria (CU) and its management are largely unknown. AIM: To understand how CU patients are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic; how specialists alter CU patient management; and the course of CU in patients with COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our cross-sectional, international, questionnaire-based, multicenter UCARE COVID-CU study assessed the impact of the pandemic on patient consultations, remote treatment, changes in medications, and clinical consequences. RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic severely impairs CU patient care, with less than 50% of the weekly numbers of patients treated as compared to before the pandemic. Reduced patient referrals and clinic hours were the major reasons. Almost half of responding UCARE physicians were involved in COVID-19 patient care, which negatively impacted on the care of urticaria patients. The rate of face-to-face consultations decreased by 62%, from 90% to less than half, whereas the rate of remote consultations increased by more than 600%, from one in 10 to more than two thirds. Cyclosporine and systemic corticosteroids, but not antihistamines or omalizumab, are used less during the pandemic. CU does not affect the course of COVID-19, but COVID-19 results in CU exacerbation in one of three patients, with higher rates in patients with severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic brings major changes and challenges for CU patients and their physicians. The long-term consequences of these changes, especially the increased use of remote consultations, require careful evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Chronic Urticaria/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Young Adult
19.
J Dermatolog Treat ; 33(2): 1140-1141, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639607

ABSTRACT

Dermatologists around the world are still doing their best to report more cutaneous manifestations of the emerging COVID-19 infection. New-onset acute or relapsing chronic urticaria may result from the body's overreacting inflammatory response to infection. The cytokine storm hits different organs in the body, including the skin, leading to activation and degranulation of mast cells with resultant urticaria. Low-dose systemic steroids combined with antihistamines can combat the COVID-19 inflammatory insult and play a role in the control of COVID-19 related severe urticarial attack.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Urticaria , Urticaria , COVID-19/complications , Histamine Antagonists/therapeutic use , Humans , Steroids/therapeutic use , Urticaria/drug therapy , Urticaria/etiology
20.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 36: 101812, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-633889

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is currently being examined for COVID-19. No previous meta-analysis has evaluated its side effects versus placebo. We conducted this meta-analysis to compare the safety of HCQ versus placebo. METHODS: Two authors independently searched PubMed and EMBASE databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adults comparing the adverse events (AEs) of HCQ versus placebo for any indication. Peto odds ratios (Peto ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated based on random-effects models. The heterogeneity (I2) was assessed using Cochran's Q test. RESULTS: Nine RCTs (eight were double-blind) with a total of 916 patients were included. HCQ caused significantly more skin pigmentation than placebo (Peto OR, 4.64; 95% CI, 1.13 to 19.00; P-value = 0.033; I2 = 0%). The increase in other AEs did not reach statistical significance: rash (Peto OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.3 to 3.77; P-value = 0.03; I2 = 0%); gastrointestinal AEs (Peto OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.55 to 3.72; P-value = 0.46; I2 = 15.17%); headache (Peto OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 0.65 to 5.78; P-value = 0.23; I2 = 9.99%); dizziness (Peto OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 0.49 to 3.52; P-value = 0.58; I2 = 0%); fatigue (Peto OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 0.76 to 5.98; P-value = 0.15; I2 = 0%); and visual AEs (Peto OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 0.76 to 3.41; P-value = 0.22; I2 = 0%). Cardiac toxicity was not reported. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis of RCTs found a significantly higher risk of skin pigmentation in HCQ users versus placebo. More data are needed to evaluate HCQ in the context of COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/drug therapy , Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects , Chronic Urticaria/drug therapy , Glomerulonephritis, IGA/drug therapy , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Hyperpigmentation/chemically induced , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Asymptomatic Infections , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Dizziness/chemically induced , Exanthema/chemically induced , Fatigue/chemically induced , Gastrointestinal Diseases/chemically induced , Headache/chemically induced , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Cutaneous/drug therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Osteoarthritis/drug therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
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