Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 394
Filter
1.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(11): e813-e818, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242655

ABSTRACT

The tremendous global toll of the COVID-19 pandemic does not fall equally on all populations. Indeed, this crisis has exerted more severe impacts on the most vulnerable communities, spotlighting the continued consequences of longstanding structural, social, and healthcare inequities. This disparity in COVID-19 parallels the unequal health consequences of climate change, whereby underlying inequities perpetuate adverse health outcomes disproportionately among vulnerable populations. As these two crises continue to unfold, there is an urgent need for healthcare practitioners to identify and implement solutions to mitigate adverse health outcomes, especially in the face of global crises. To support this need, the 2021 Clinical Climate Change Conference held a virtual meeting to discuss the implications of the convergence of the climate crisis and COVID-19, particularly for vulnerable patient populations and the clinicians who care for them. Presenters and panelists provided evidence-based solutions to help health professionals improve and adapt their practice to these evolving scenarios. Together, participants explored the community health system and national solutions to reduce the impacts of COVID-19 and the climate crisis, to promote community advocacy, and foster new partnerships between community and healthcare leaders to combat systemic racism and achieve a more just and equitable society.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Racism , Climate Change , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 30(25): 67839-67853, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236975

ABSTRACT

This study examines the nexus between financial stability, climate risks, GHG emission mitigation, and green economic recovery of China. Financing efforts to protect against and reduce the hazards associated with climate change need to consider these risks and resources. Study used the Kalman technique of analysis for empirical inference. This research focuses on the carbon risk in China by employing a Kalman estimation approach. Although environmental mitigation was found to be important at 39%, financial strength and carbon hazards were considerable at 34%. Moreover, the report demonstrates the relationship between climatic threats and environmental drift in China, at a rate of 17%, emphasizing the need to address climate change issues. A state's fiscal health guarantees national economic security while pursuing green economic recovery initiatives. Researchers concluded that precise policy suggestions were needed to promote green economic development.


Subject(s)
Carbon , Economic Development , China , Carbon Dioxide , Climate Change
5.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 30(33): 79960-79979, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232117

ABSTRACT

After COVID-19, financing for emerging nation reserves in renewable energy bases was deemed a crucial aspect of sustainable development. Investing in biogas energy plants can be highly beneficial for lowering the use of fossil fuels. Using a survey of shareholders, investors, biogas energy professionals, and active social media participants in Pakistan, this study evaluates the intentions of individual investors to invest in biogas energy plants. The primary purpose of this study is to increase investment intent for biogas energy projects following COVID-19. This study focuses on financing biogas energy plants in the post-COVID-19 era and evaluates the research's assumptions using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). The study employed the technique of purposive sampling to acquire data for this investigation. The results indicate that attitudes, perceived biogas energy benefits, perceived investment attitudes, and supervisory structure evaluations inspire one's propensity to finance biogas vitality plant efforts. The study found a link between eco-friendly responsiveness, monetary benefits, and investors' actions. The aspiration of investors to mark such reserves was set up to be unpretentious by their risk aversion. Conferring to the facts, evaluating the monitoring structure is the critical factor. The previous studies on investment behavior and other forms of pro-environmental intent and action yielded contradictory results. In addition, the regulatory environment was evaluated to see how the theory of planned behavior (TPB) affects financiers' objectives to participate in biogas power plants. The consequences of the study indicate that feelings of pride and discernment of energy expansively affect people's desire to invest in biogas plants. Biogas energy efficacy has little effect on investors' decisions to invest in biogas energy plants. This study offers policymakers practical ideas on enhancing investments in biogas energy plants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , Biofuels , Climate Change , Economic Development , Inventions , Pandemics
6.
Sci Total Environ ; 892: 164679, 2023 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245265

ABSTRACT

To prevent anthropogenic warming of the climate system above dangerous thresholds, governments are required by the Paris Agreement to peak global anthropogenic CO2 emissions and to reach a net zero CO2 emissions level (also known as carbon neutrality). Growing concerns are being expressed about the increasing heat stress caused by the interaction of changes in temperature and humidity in the context of global warming. Although much effort has been made to examine future changes in heat stress and associated risks, gaps remain in understanding the quantitative benefits of heat-risk avoidance from carbon-neutral policies, limited by the traditional climate projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6). Here we quantify the avoided heat risk during 2040-2049 under two scenarios of global carbon neutrality by 2060 and 2050, i.e., moderate green (MODGREEN) and strong green (STRGREEN) recovery scenarios, relative to the baseline scenario (FOSSIL), based on multi-model large ensemble climate projections from a new climate model intercomparison project (CovidMIP) that endorsed by CMIP6. We show that global population exposure to extreme heat stress increases by approximately four times its current level during 2040-2049 under the FOSSIL scenario, whereas the heat exposure could be reduced by as much as 12 % and 23 % under the MODGREEN and STRGREEN scenarios, respectively. Moreover, global mean heat-related mortality risk is mitigated by 14 % (24 %) under the MODGREEN (STRGREEN) scenario during 2040-2049 relative to the FOSSIL scenario. Additionally, the aggravating heat risk could be mitigated by around a tenth by achieving carbon neutrality 10 years earlier (2050 versus 2060). In terms of spatial pattern, this heat-risk avoidance from low-carbon policies is typically greater in low-income countries. Our findings assist governments in advancing early climate change mitigation policy-making.


Subject(s)
Carbon , Heat Stress Disorders , Humans , Carbon Dioxide , Climate Change , Global Warming , Temperature
7.
Environ Res ; 231(Pt 2): 116090, 2023 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324461

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic appeared summer surge in 2022 worldwide and this contradicts its seasonal fluctuations. Even as high temperature and intense ultraviolet radiation can inhibit viral activity, the number of new cases worldwide has increased to >78% in only 1 month since the summer of 2022 under unchanged virus mutation influence and control policies. Using the attribution analysis based on the theoretical infectious diseases model simulation, we found the mechanism of the severe COVID-19 outbreak in the summer of 2022 and identified the amplification effect of heat wave events on its magnitude. The results suggest that approximately 69.3% of COVID-19 cases this summer could have been avoided if there is no heat waves. The collision between the pandemic and the heatwave is not an accident. Climate change is leading to more frequent extreme climate events and an increasing number of infectious diseases, posing an urgent threat to human health and life. Therefore, public health authorities must quickly develop coordinated management plans to deal with the simultaneous occurrence of extreme climate events and infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Humans , Pandemics , Ultraviolet Rays , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hot Temperature , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Climate Change
8.
PLoS Pathog ; 19(4): e1011268, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321460

ABSTRACT

Candia auris is an emerging human pathogenic yeast; yet, despite phenotypic attributes and genomic evidence suggesting that it probably emerged from a natural reservoir, we know nothing about the environmental phase of its life cycle and the transmission pathways associated with it. The thermotolerant characteristics of C. auris have been hypothesised to be an environmental adaptation to increasing temperatures due to global warming (which may have facilitated its ability to tolerate the mammalian thermal barrier that is considered a protective strategy for humans against colonisation by environmental fungi with pathogenic potential). Thus, C. auris may be the first human pathogenic fungus to have emerged as a result of climate change. In addition, the release of antifungal chemicals, such as azoles, into the environment (from both pharmaceutical and agricultural sources) is likely to be responsible for the environmental enrichment of resistant strains of C. auris; however, the survival and dissemination of C. auris in the natural environment is poorly understood. In this paper, we critically review the possible pathways through which C. auris can be introduced into the environment and evaluate the environmental characteristics that can influence its persistence and transmission in natural environments. Identifying potential environmental niches and reservoirs of C. auris and understanding its emergence against a backdrop of climate change and environmental pollution will be crucial for the development of effective epidemiological and environmental management responses.


Subject(s)
Candida auris , Candida , Animals , Humans , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Candida/genetics , Climate Change , Mammals , Microbial Sensitivity Tests
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(7)2023 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296036

ABSTRACT

'Forever' chemicals that unintendedly in the long run pollute the environment, climate change, COVID; life continuously faces all sorts of unforeseen challenges that are an inevitable side product of 'progress' [...].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Toxicology , Humans , Climate Change
15.
Public Health ; 218: 146-148, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302533

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to provide insights into how local resilience structures in England can be leveraged to deliver a whole-of-society approach to managing a national response to extreme heat events during summer months. STUDY DESIGN: A communication based on the literature review of currently available research on health emergency response and extreme heat events in England. METHODS: This communication draws insights from the authors' research programmes, which examined national-level public health emergency response during the COVID-19 pandemic and literature review of the latest available English research on health and extreme heat events. RESULTS: Periods of extreme heat are on the rise in England. Local resilience forums (LRFs), due to their multiagency nature, offer a shared situational awareness and understanding of the need in their local communities. Such information is critical to ensure messaging about heat risks and available resources are tailored to reach specific targeted groups within their communities. Scenario planning and adaptation efforts require a more local articulation which LRFs are well placed to manage. CONCLUSIONS: LRFs are well suited as key structures in the English emergency response to extreme heat events. We suggest that English public health and hospital organisations, working with community partners via the LRFs, must develop their thinking about pressures from adverse weather in the summer months.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extreme Heat , Humans , Extreme Heat/adverse effects , Pandemics , Climate Change , Weather
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(6)2023 03 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301545

ABSTRACT

Global megatrends, including climate change and urbanisation, are shaping and changing how we live in the future [...].


Subject(s)
Climate Change , Mental Health , Urbanization , Forecasting
18.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(18): e2105006119, 2022 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306488

ABSTRACT

The world has committed trillions in fiscal expenditures to reboot the economy in the post­COVID-19 era. However, the effectiveness and the equity impacts of current fiscal stimuli are not fully understood. Using an extended adaptive regional input­output model, we assess the short-term impacts (2020 through 2022) of feasible stimuli on the global economy and the labor market. Our findings show that the stimuli pledged by 26 countries, i.e., 2.4 trillion euros in total, are effective in keeping the recession short and shallow by saving 53 million to 57 million jobs (compared to the no-stimulus scenario). However, the stimuli exacerbate income inequity at the global scale if we define "equity" as those who suffer more from the pandemic should receive more assistance. Low-skilled workers in these countries, who suffer more from the pandemic than high-skilled workers, benefit 38 to 41% less from the job-creation effects of the current fiscal stimuli. As an alternative, low-carbon stimuli can achieve a balance between effectiveness and equity at the global level. Low-carbon stimuli save 55 million to 58 million jobs and decrease income inequality by 2 to 3% globally compared to the currently pledged stimuli. Country-level situations are more complicated, as modifying the current stimuli to achieve more "greenness" brings win­win in effectiveness and equity in some countries, while in the others, more greenness and equity are at the expense of less job savings. Our findings underscore the need to consider the overlooked trade-offs between effectiveness, equity, and greenness, both globally and nationally, when designing further postpandemic fiscal stimuli.


Subject(s)
Employment , Income , Climate Change , Humans
19.
Epidemiol Prev ; 45(5): 416-422, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2272811

ABSTRACT

The objective of this article is to examine the role of doctors and health professionals in communicating the health impacts of climate change and exploring how achieving climate objectives is co-beneficial to public health objectives. This article identifies the main interpretative frameworks for climate change communication identified in the literature, contextualizes the challenge of climate communication in the field of public health, and analyses the element of trust, without which the communication process is likely to fail. Awareness-raising strategies must therefore create appropriate contexts that allow the public to perceive climate change as a relevant and immediate issue. Further, to be properly considered, such information must be issued from a source the public trusts. After providing a general framework within which to examine the role of doctors and health professionals in climate communication, message content is examined along with trust in message sources and in the medical profession, and the perceptions among and training of medical professionals concerning the climate challenge are considered.The literature reviewed in this article represents the body of climate change communication research related to the role of the doctor, an area of growing interest. This review provides a timely and complete analysis of the literature on the subject with the goal of starting a necessary, but too-long postponed, multidisciplinary dialogue.


Subject(s)
Climate Change , Communication , Health Personnel , Humans , Italy , Public Health
20.
Sci Total Environ ; 878: 162936, 2023 Jun 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285682

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant disruptions to the world since 2020, with over 647 million confirmed cases and 6.7 million reported deaths as of January 2023. Despite its far-reaching impact, the effects of COVID-19 on the progress of global climate change negotiations have yet to be thoroughly evaluated. This discussion paper conducts an examination of COVID-19's impact on climate change actions at global, national, and local levels through a comprehensive review of existing literature. This analysis reveals that the pandemic has resulted in delays in implementing climate policies and altered priorities from climate action to the pandemic response. Despite these setbacks, the pandemic has also presented opportunities for accelerating the transition to a low-carbon economy. The interplay between these outcomes and the different levels of governance will play a crucial role in determining the success or failure of future climate change negotiations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Climate Change , Negotiating , Pandemics , Carbon
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL