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1.
J Vet Med Educ ; 49(2): 187-198, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775619

ABSTRACT

Clinical clerkships have long been a pillar of veterinary medical education. These experiences provide students a unique opportunity to apply skills learned in pre-clinical training through hands-on practice. However, the emergence of the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and the subsequent global pandemic of 2020 forced many clinical instructors to adapt to teaching online. This teaching tip describes the use of backward design to create a three-part online clinical learning environment for the delivery of small animal primary care consisting of synchronous rounds, simulated online appointments, and independent learning activities. Results of a survey of students' perspectives on the experience demonstrate that the majority of students found that the online clinical experience met or exceeded expectations and provided a meaningful learning experience. Recommendations based on student feedback and instructor reflection are provided to guide creation and implementation of future online clinical courses. As the field of telemedicine grows, we view incorporation of such learning environments into veterinary medical education curriculum as essential to preparing students to enter the modern veterinary workplace.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Education, Veterinary , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/veterinary , Humans , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(11): 1100-1104, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700322

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Drastic and rapid changes to medical education are uncommon because of regulations and restrictions designed to ensure consistency among medical school curriculums and to safeguard student well-being. As a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, medical education had to break away from its conventions and transition from time-honored teaching methods to innovative solutions. This article explores the anticipated and actual efficacy of the swift conversion of a specialty elective from a traditional in-person format to a fully virtual clerkship. In addition, it includes a noninferiority study to determine where a virtual classroom may excel or fall short in comparison with conventional clinical rotations.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Models, Educational , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/education , Adult , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Male , Minnesota , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 19(4): 567-575, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676786

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose was to create and analyze a competency-based model of educating medical students in a radiology clerkship that can be used to guide curricular reform. METHODS: During the 2019 to 2020 academic year, 326 fourth-year medical students were enrolled in a 2-week required clerkship. An online testing platform, ExamSoft (Dallas, Texas), was used to test pre- and postinstruction knowledge on "must see" diagnoses, as outlined in the National Medical Student Curriculum in Radiology. Assessment analysis was used to compare the frequency with which the correct diagnosis was identified on the pretest to that on the posttest. At the end of the academic year, in addition to statistical analysis, categorical analysis was used to classify the degree of this change to uncover topics that students found most challenging. RESULTS: For 23 of the 27 topics (85%), there was a significant improvement in diagnostic accuracy after instruction in the test curriculum. Categorical analysis further demonstrated that the clerkship had a high impact in teaching 13 of the 27 topics (48%), had a lower impact for 6 topics (22%), and identified the remaining 8 topics (30%) as gaps in teaching and learning. CONCLUSIONS: For medical students, our instructional program significantly increased competency for most critical radiologic diagnoses. Categorical analysis adds value beyond statistical analysis and allows dynamic tailoring of teaching to address gaps in student learning.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Radiology , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Humans , Radiology/education , Texas
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 43, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented disruption in medical education. Students and lecturers had to adapt to online education. The current study aimed to investigate the level of satisfaction and future preference for online lectures among clinical clerkship students and elucidated the factors that affect these outcomes. METHODS: We selected a sample of 114 medical students undergoing clinical clerkship during the COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted onsite lectures before the pandemic and online lectures after the outbreak. A survey was conducted, and the sample included students and 17 lecturers. The average scores of total satisfaction and future preference related to online lectures were computed. RESULTS: Students' scores on total satisfaction with online lectures and their future preference were higher than those for onsite lectures. Scores on the ease of debating dimension were low and those on accessibility of lectures in online lectures were higher than those in onsite lectures. There was no difference between the two groups in the scores on the comprehensibility and ease of asking questions dimensions. Results of the multiple regression analysis revealed that accessibility determined total satisfaction, and future preference was determined by comprehensibility as well as accessibility. Contrary to students' future preferences, lecturers favored onsite lectures to online ones. CONCLUSION: Online lectures are an acceptable mode of teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic for students undergoing clinical clerkship. Online lectures are expected to become more pervasive to avoid the spread of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
5.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(1): 33-39, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638790

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Safety concerns surrounding the coronavirus 2019 pandemic led to the prohibition of student rotations outside their home institutions. This resulted in emergency medicine (EM)-bound students having less specialty experience and exposure to outside programs and practice environments, and fewer opportunities to gain additional Standardized Letters of Evaluation, a cornerstone of the EM residency application. We filled this void by implementing a virtual clerkship. METHODS: We created a two-week virtual, fourth-year visiting clerkship focused on advanced medical knowledge topics, social determinants of health, professional development, and professional identity formation. Students completed asynchronous assignments and participated in small group-facilitated didactic sessions. We evaluated the virtual clerkship with pre- and post-medical knowledge tests and evaluative surveys. RESULTS: We hosted 26 senior medical students over two administrations of the same two-week virtual clerkship. Students had a statistically significant improvement on the medical knowledge post-tests compared to pre-tests (71.7% [21.5/30] to 76.3% [22.9/30]). Students reported being exposed to social determinants of health concepts they had not previously been exposed to. Students appreciated the interactive nature of the sessions; networking with other students, residents, and faculty; introduction to novel content regarding social determinants of health; and exposure to future career opportunities. Screen time, technological issues, and mismatch between volume of content and time allotted were identified as potential challenges and areas for improvement. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that a virtual EM visiting clerkship is feasible to implement, supports knowledge acquisition, and is perceived as valuable by participants. The benefits seen and challenges faced in the development and implementation of our clerkship can serve to inform future virtual clerkships, which we feel is a complement to traditional visiting clerkships even though in-person clerkships have been re-established.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Emergency Medicine , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Emergency Medicine/education , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Neurology ; 98(7): 279-286, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593693

ABSTRACT

The standard neurology clinical experience in medical school focuses primarily on bedside patient encounters; however, the limitations of the clinical environment due to the current COVID-19 pandemic have accelerated the need for virtual curriculum development. To provide guidance to Neurology clerkship directors during this unprecedented time, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Undergraduate Education Subcommittee (UES) formed a workgroup to develop an outline for a virtual curriculum, provide recommendations, and describe models of integrating virtual curricula into the neurology clerkship. In this overview, we discuss different methods of virtual instruction, hybrid models of clerkship training and the challenges to its implementation, professionalism issues, and modification of feedback and assessment techniques specific to the virtual learning environment. We also offer suggestions for implementation of a hybrid virtual curriculum into the neurology clerkship. The virtual curriculum is intended to supplement the core neurology in-person clinical experience and should not be used for shortening or replacing the required neurology clinical clerkship.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Education, Distance , Neurology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Clerkship/organization & administration , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Humans , Neurology/education , United States/epidemiology
7.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1857322, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574791

ABSTRACT

Many challenges could occur that result in the need to handle an increase in the number of medical student clinical placements, such as curricular transformations or viral pandemics, such as COVID 19. Here, we describe four different institutions' approaches to addressing the impact of curricular transformation on clerkships using an implementation science lens. Specifically, we explore four different approaches to managing the 'bulge' as classes overlap in clerkships Curriculum leaders at four medical schools report on managing the bulge of core clinical placements resulting from reducing the duration of the foundational sciences curriculum and calendar shifts for the respective clerkship curriculum. These changes, which occurred between 2014 and 2018, led to more students being enrolled in core clinical rotations at the same time than occurred previously. Schools provided respective metrics used to evaluate the effectiveness of their bulge management technique. These data typically included number of students affected in each phase of their curricular transformation, performance on standardized examinations, and student and faculty feedback. Not all data were available from all schools, as some schools are still working through their 'bulge' or are affected by COVID-19. There is much to be learned about managing curricular transformations. Working on such endeavors in a learning collaborative such as the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education Initiative provided support and insights about how to survive, thrive and identifying lessons learned during curricular transformation.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Curriculum , Schools, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Clin Teach ; 19(1): 29-35, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528517

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As mortality and morbidity due to substance use disorder (SUD) are increasing for women, especially during pregnancy and postpartum, it is imperative to equip medical providers with skills to identify SUD and initiate treatments. We designed a curriculum to provide third-year medical students with clinical exposure to SUD during pregnancy. APPROACH: This novel, experience-based SUD curriculum was focused on providing adequate knowledge, skills and confidence to provide compassionate, patient-centred care to women with SUD. Obstetrics and Gynecology clerkship third-year medical students rotated 1 day through a clinic that provides Obstetrics and Gynecology and addiction medicine services. Congruent with COVID-19 limitations, students completed pre-clinic assignments and in-clinic tasks (e.g., screening, brief intervention, referral to treatment [SBIRT]) under supervision. EVALUATION: After implementation of this pilot curriculum, 20 students and 10 teachers completed surveys (100% response rate) with open-ended response items. Quantitative data and open-ended responses using electronic surveys were sequentially analysed to evaluate the curriculum's feasibility and acceptability. IMPLICATIONS: We designed a novel curriculum that focused on SUD learning objectives and providing exposure to third-year medical students, and our findings indicate that it is feasible and acceptable to both students and teachers. In the future, we plan to provide this curriculum to both our third- and fourth-year medical students, and we encourage teachers and providers at other institutions to utilise it during their clinical training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(11): 3497-3502, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine (TM) experiences in undergraduate medical education were uncommon. When students' clinical experiences were interrupted due to the pandemic, TM education provided opportunities for students to participate in clinical care while adhering to social distancing guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of TM experiences in the internal medicine (IM) core clerkship experience prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, during interruption in clinical clerkships, and following the return to in-person activities at US medical schools. DESIGN: The Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) survey is a national, annually recurring thematic survey of IM core clerkship directors. The 2020 survey focused on effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, including a section about TM. The survey was fielded online from August through October 2020. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 137 core clinical medicine clerkship directors at Liaison Committee on Medical Education fully accredited US/US territory-based medical schools. MAIN MEASURES: A 10-item thematic survey section assessing student participation in TM and assessment of TM-related competencies. KEY RESULTS: The response rate was 73.7% (101/137 medical schools). No respondents reported TM curricular experiences prior to the pandemic. During clinical interruption, 39.3% of respondents reported TM experiences in the IM clerkship, whereas 24.7% reported such experiences occurring at the time they completed the survey. A higher percentage of clerkships with an ambulatory component reported TM to be an important competency compared to those without an ambulatory component. CONCLUSIONS: The extent to which TM was used in the IM clinical clerkship, and across clinical clerkships, increased substantially when medical students were removed from in-person clinical duties as a response to COVID-19. When students returned to in-person clinical duties, experiences in TM continued, suggesting the continued value of TM as part of the formal education of students during the medicine clerkship. Curricula and faculty development will be needed to support TM education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Telemedicine , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
10.
Med Teach ; 44(3): 328-333, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500839

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Health Systems Science (HSS) teaches students critical skills to navigate complex health systems, yet medical schools often find it difficult to integrate into their curriculum due to limited time and student disinterest. Co-developing content with students and teaching through appropriate experiential learning can improve student engagement in HSS coursework. METHODS: Medical students and faculty co-developed a patient outreach initiative during the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and integrated that experience into a new experiential HSS elective beginning May 2020. Students called patients identified as high-risk for adverse health outcomes and followed a script to connect patients to healthcare and social services. Subsequently, this initiative was integrated into the required third-year primary care clerkship. RESULTS: A total of 255 students participated in HSS experiential learning through the elective and clerkship from May 2020 through July 2021. Students reached 3,212 patients, encountering a breadth of medical, social, and health systems issues; navigated the EMR; engaged interdisciplinary professionals; and proposed opportunities for health systems improvement. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: This educational intervention demonstrated the opportunity to partner with student-led initiatives, coproducing meaningful educational experiences for the learners within the confines of a busy medical curriculum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning
12.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1996216, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493437

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in significant disruptions to medical education. The patient care space was unavailable as a learning environment, which compounded the complexity of preparing students for clerkships with a traditional transition to clerkship (TTC) curriculum. We developed a multimodal, structured approach to re-introduce students to the clinical space prior to the start of clerkships. 105 second year medical students completed a 4-week clinical enhancement course. A modified Delphi method was used to select core topics, which were then anchored to key Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs). Students participated in 9 virtual problem-based cases, workshops and multiple supervised patient encounters. Students were surveyed before, during, and after the course; responses were compared with paired t-tests. 25.9% rated the course as excellent, 44.2% as very good, and 19.5% as good. Compared to baseline, self-perceived efficacy grew significantly (P < 0.05) across all EPAs. Improvements in key competencies were sustained when students were surveyed 2 weeks into their first clerkship. This was a well-received, novel course, focused on helping students transition back into the clinical space through a multimodal teaching approach. This framework may be used by other institutions seeking to restructure their TTC initiatives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Students, Medical , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 549, 2021 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the cancellation of clinical clerkships due to COVID-19, the Johns Hopkins (JH) Neurology Education Team developed a virtual elective to enhance medical students' clinical telemedicine skills and foster community between academic institutions. METHODS: This two-week clinical elective, entitled "Virtual Patient Rounds in Neurology," was administered once in April 2020 and once in May 2020. The curriculum included attending/fellow-led Virtual Rounds, Student Presentations, and Asynchronous Educational Activities. We also developed a new lecture series entitled JHNeuroChats, which consisted of live synchronous lectures presented by JH faculty and Virtual Visiting Professors. Trainees and faculty from outside institutions were invited to participate in the JHNeuroChats. Students and faculty completed pre- and post-elective surveys to assess the educational impact of the elective. Student's t-tests were used to compare scores between pre- and post-elective surveys. RESULTS: Seven JH medical students enrolled in each iteration of the elective, and an additional 337 trainees and faculty, representing 14 different countries, registered for the JHNeuroChats. We hosted 48 unique JHNeuroChats, 32 (66.7%) of which were led by invited Virtual Visiting Professors. At the end of the elective, students reported increased confidence in virtually obtaining a history (P < 0.0001) and performing a telehealth neurological physical exam (P < 0.0001), compared to the start of the course. In addition, faculty members reported increased confidence in teaching clinical medicine virtually, although these findings were not statistically significant (P = 0.15). CONCLUSIONS: Despite the constraints imposed by COVID-19, this virtual Neurology elective increased medical students' confidence in certain telemedicine skills and successfully broadened our learning community to encompass learners from around the world. As virtual medical education becomes more prevalent, it is important that we are intentional in creating opportunities for shared learning across institutions. We believe that this elective can serve as a model for these future educational collaborations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Neurology , Students, Medical , Telemedicine , Curriculum , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(11): 1100-1104, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483693

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Drastic and rapid changes to medical education are uncommon because of regulations and restrictions designed to ensure consistency among medical school curriculums and to safeguard student well-being. As a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, medical education had to break away from its conventions and transition from time-honored teaching methods to innovative solutions. This article explores the anticipated and actual efficacy of the swift conversion of a specialty elective from a traditional in-person format to a fully virtual clerkship. In addition, it includes a noninferiority study to determine where a virtual classroom may excel or fall short in comparison with conventional clinical rotations.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Models, Educational , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/education , Adult , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Male , Minnesota , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1983927, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483271

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The volume of literature about serious gaming in dental education has increased, however, none of the previous studies have developed a serious game for closing the gap between preclinical and clinical training. OBJECTIVE: Virtual Dental Clinic (VDC) is a serious game that was created to help develop clinical reasoning skills in dental students. This study aimed to evaluate VDC as an educational tool and its effectiveness on clinical skill and knowledge gain among clerkship dental students. METHODS: The following three stages of VDC design and testing were addressed from 2016 to 2020: development, validation, and application. The VDC was developed using Unity game engine. In the validation stage, the content validity was reviewed by five visiting staff; construct validity and face validity were examined by 9 postgraduate-year dentists and 14 clerkship dental students. Concurrent validity and predictive validity were examined by 34 fifth-year dental students during their clerkship from September, 2018 to May, 2019, the associations between VDC experiences, clerkship performance, and the score on a national qualification test were explored. In the application stage, the VDC was set up as a self-learning tool in the Family Dentistry Department from August, 2019, quantitative and qualitative analyses were conducted using the 92 clerkship students' feedback. RESULTS: The VDC showed good validity and a high potential for education in practice. Students who have used VDC received significantly higher scores on qualification test (p = 0.029); the VDC experiences significantly predicted higher performance score on periodontics (p = 0.037) and endodontics (p = 0.040). After the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic, significantly higher proportion of students confirmed the value of VDC as an assistant tool for learning clinical reasoning (p = 0.019). CONCLUSIONS: The VDC as an educational tool, and the effectiveness on clinical reasoning skills and knowledge gain among clerkship dental students has been validated and confirmed in this study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Students, Medical , Clinical Competence , Dental Clinics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Surg Educ ; 79(2): 535-542, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466738

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The visiting orthopaedic clerkship is viewed by both students and program directors as an important part of the orthopaedic surgery residency application process, despite being criticized as costly and inefficient. Restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic prevented students from participating in in-person clerkships at institutions other than at their home programs, necessitating a virtual replacement for the in-person orthopaedics clerkship experience. It remains unclear how the virtual clerkships will affect the application process this year, and moving forward. We describe and review our institution's initial experience with a virtual orthopaedic clerkship. We hypothesize that students would view the virtual clerkship as valuable, and that students would see a role for such clerkships going forward. DESIGN: A virtual orthopaedic surgery clerkship was created and students were invited to enroll. Thirty-one 4th-year medical students participated. Each clerkship included 8 two-hour sessions. Each session was moderated by a faculty member, and participants included only medical students. Students presented virtual cases, which provided the basis for the discussion and education. At the conclusion of each clerkship, students were given an anonymous survey assessing various aspects of the clerkship. RESULTS: Twenty-seven students responded to the survey. Overall, 15 students rated the experience as outstanding, 11 excellent, and 1 good. Twenty-two students saw a role for virtual clerkships moving forward, and five students did not see a role moving forward. Student reported strengths of the clerkship included direct faculty interaction, structured curriculum, and student-centered discussions. Lack of hands-on experience was cited as the biggest weakness. CONCLUSIONS: Students valued the opportunity for a virtual clerkship, and most could envision a role for such virtual clerkships moving forward. We suggest that virtual clerkships may be a cost-effective and useful tool in helping both students and programs navigate the residency selection process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Orthopedics , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Acad Psychiatry ; 45(6): 738-741, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1465953

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to assess the change in medical students' attitudes towards psychiatry following a virtual clerkship experience compared to a traditional clerkship experience. METHOD: Ninety-seven medical students from the University of Ottawa were assessed pre- and post-clerkship on the ATP-30 (Attitudes Towards Psychiatry-30) measure. Cohorts of students were categorized as pre-COVID or during-COVID depending on when and how they experienced their clerkship (traditional or virtual). The total student response rate was approximately 48%. A quasi-experimental design was implemented, and non-parametric statistics were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Medical students' overall attitudes towards psychiatry improved from pre- to post-clerkship, with the type of clerkship experience (traditional or virtual) having no significant impact on the magnitude to which attitudes improved. CONCLUSION: Implementation of a virtual clerkship in psychiatry did not deteriorate medical student attitudes towards psychiatry as a specialty, with both the traditional and virtual clerkship program enhancing students' attitudes towards psychiatry favorably.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Psychiatry , Students, Medical , Attitude of Health Personnel , Humans , Psychiatry/education , SARS-CoV-2
18.
BMC Pharmacol Toxicol ; 22(1): 58, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468104

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) caused by Novel Coronavirus named as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) was declared Pandemic by The World Health Organization (WHO) and a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) on January 30, 2020. Many COVID-19 vaccines have been developed, including CoronaVac vaccines by Sinovac. Health care workers, along with medical clerkship students are the priority to receive the vaccine. However, the Adverse Events Following Immunization (AEFI) of the CoronaVac remains unclear. This study aims to describe and analyze the adverse events following immunization (AEFI) of COVID-19 vaccination in medical students in clerkship programs. METHOD: We conducted a cross-sectional study using a questionnaire to assess AEFI after CoronaVac vaccination among medical clerkship students. A Chi-Square test with 95 % of CI was used to determine whether gender correlated with symptoms of AEFI. RESULT: We identified 144 medical clerkship students. The most common AEFI of SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations was localized pain in the injection site during the first dose with 25 (45 %) reports and the booster dose with 34 (67 %) reports. Then followed by malaise, the first dose with 20 (36 %) reports and the booster dose with 21 (41 %) reports. Other symptoms like headache, fever, shivering, sleepiness, nausea, dysphagia, and cold were also reported. CONCLUSIONS: CoronaVac SARS-COV-2 vaccine has several mild symptoms of AEFI and not correlated with gender. Nevertheless, follow-up after vaccination is needed to prevent immunologic responses that may occur in some patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Adult , Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems , Apathy , Clinical Clerkship , Cross-Sectional Studies , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunization, Secondary/adverse effects , Indonesia , Injections/adverse effects , Male , Pain/etiology , Sex Factors , Students, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/adverse effects , Young Adult
19.
Psychiatr Q ; 93(2): 419-434, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453816

ABSTRACT

For medical students first entering the clinical space in July 2020, the unique challenges related to the coronavirus pandemic threatened to amplify the psychological distress associated with clerkship rotations. This study aimed to characterize the mental health of third-year medical students starting clinical clerkships in the midst of a pandemic by assessing symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as risk, coping, and protective factors associated with psychological outcomes. Of 147 third-year medical students at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, 110 (75%) participated in this prospective survey-based study with 108 included in the final analysis. 43 (39.8%) respondents screened positive for symptoms of either MDD, GAD, or PTSD. Multiple regression analyses revealed that greater overall symptom severity was associated with more avoidant coping, more traumatic events witnessed, poorer student and leisure functioning, lower trait emotional stability, and lower social support. Worries related to COVID-19 did not significantly influence outcome variables. To better understand the role of the pandemic on psychological outcomes in third-year medical students, additional research should focus on the trajectory of these outcomes over the year during the coronavirus pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Depressive Disorder, Major , Students, Medical , Depression/psychology , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology
20.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(11): 3497-3502, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397047

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine (TM) experiences in undergraduate medical education were uncommon. When students' clinical experiences were interrupted due to the pandemic, TM education provided opportunities for students to participate in clinical care while adhering to social distancing guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of TM experiences in the internal medicine (IM) core clerkship experience prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, during interruption in clinical clerkships, and following the return to in-person activities at US medical schools. DESIGN: The Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) survey is a national, annually recurring thematic survey of IM core clerkship directors. The 2020 survey focused on effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, including a section about TM. The survey was fielded online from August through October 2020. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 137 core clinical medicine clerkship directors at Liaison Committee on Medical Education fully accredited US/US territory-based medical schools. MAIN MEASURES: A 10-item thematic survey section assessing student participation in TM and assessment of TM-related competencies. KEY RESULTS: The response rate was 73.7% (101/137 medical schools). No respondents reported TM curricular experiences prior to the pandemic. During clinical interruption, 39.3% of respondents reported TM experiences in the IM clerkship, whereas 24.7% reported such experiences occurring at the time they completed the survey. A higher percentage of clerkships with an ambulatory component reported TM to be an important competency compared to those without an ambulatory component. CONCLUSIONS: The extent to which TM was used in the IM clinical clerkship, and across clinical clerkships, increased substantially when medical students were removed from in-person clinical duties as a response to COVID-19. When students returned to in-person clinical duties, experiences in TM continued, suggesting the continued value of TM as part of the formal education of students during the medicine clerkship. Curricula and faculty development will be needed to support TM education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Telemedicine , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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