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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 206, 2020 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) global pandemic has resulted in unprecedented public health measures. This has impacted the UK education sector with many universities halting campus-based teaching and examinations. The aim of this study is to identify the impact of COVID-19 on final year medical students' examinations and placements in the United Kingdom (UK) and how it might impact their confidence and preparedness going into their first year of foundation training. METHODS: A 10-item online survey was distributed to final year medical students across 33 UK medical schools. The survey was designed by combining dichotomous, multiple choice and likert response scale questions. Participants were asked about the effect that the COVID-19 global pandemic had on final year medical written exams, electives, assistantships and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). The survey also explored the student's confidence and preparedness going into their first year of training under these new unprecedented circumstances. RESULTS: Four hundred forty students from 32 UK medical schools responded. 38.4% (n = 169) of respondents had their final OSCEs cancelled while 43.0% (n = 189) had already completed their final OSCEs before restrictions. 43.0% (n = 189) of assistantship placements were postponed while 77.3% (n = 340) had electives cancelled. The impact of COVID-19 on OSCEs, written examinations and student assistantships significantly affected students' preparedness (respectively p = 0.025, 0.008, 0.0005). In contrast, when measuring confidence, only changes to student assistantships had a significant effect (p = 0.0005). The majority of students feel that measures taken during this pandemic to amend their curricula was necessary. Respondents also agree that assisting in hospitals during the outbreak would be a valuable learning opportunity. CONCLUSIONS: The impact on medical student education has been significant, particularly affecting the transition from student to doctor. This study showed the disruptions to student assistantships had the biggest effect on students' confidence and preparedness. For those willing to assist in hospitals to join the front-line workforce, it is crucial to maintain their wellbeing with safeguards such as proper inductions, support and supervision.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Competence , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , Young Adult
6.
Adv Respir Med ; 88(4): 366-368, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-737868

ABSTRACT

We discuss the hypothesis that common Chest Drain Systems collected to a COVID-19 patient, could be a possible source of contamination for health care staff in a Thoracic Surgery ward and we propose an alternative way to minimize this further risk of transmission.


Subject(s)
Chest Tubes/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/methods , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Drainage/adverse effects , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Management/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , Thoracostomy/methods
7.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 58(227): 480-486, 2020 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-709636

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The lack of knowledge among health care professionals leads to diagnostic delays, further spread of disease, and poor infection control practices. Health care professionals must be updated knowledge regarding COVID-19. This study aims to assess the knowledge of health care professionals regarding COVID -19 in a medical college in Chitwan. METHODS: A Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Chitwan, Nepal from April 22, 2020, to April 28, 2020. The institutional review committee of Chitwan Medical College provided ethical approval for the research. Data were collected with an online questionnaire using Google forms. The questionnaire was sent out to 724 potential responders who included health care professionals from medical, dental, nursing, and allied health sciences in Chitwan Medical College. A convenient sampling method was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package of Social Sciences. RESULTS: A total of 181 respondents completed the web survey. Overall, a total of 35 (19.3%) respondents were found to have "Good" knowledge; 105 (58%) respondents had "Fair" knowledge and 41 (22.7%) respondents had "Poor" knowledge regarding various aspects of COVID-19. There was no significant difference among the various health professional groups in their knowledge scores under the four knowledge domains. CONCLUSIONS: The study of knowledge of health care professionals could act as a reference for the prevention and better management of COVID-19. This study shows that there is a need to implement periodic educational interventions and training programs on infection control practices for COVID-19 across all healthcare professions.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections , Dentists , Nurses , Pandemics , Physicians , Pneumonia, Viral , Students, Medical , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nepal , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
8.
Curr Opin Rheumatol ; 32(5): 429-433, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704674

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There are currently many unanswered questions surrounding the management of patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic and several 'rapid' guidelines have been released, although are subject to be updated and changed in the near future. The purpose of this review is to discuss the approach to management of patients with immune-mediated diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: At present, there is little evidence to suggest an increased risk of COVID-19 infection or its complications in patients with immune-mediated diseases or associated with conventional or biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs; however, glucocorticoid use does appear to have negative associations. SUMMARY: Currently, conventional and biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs can be continued in the absence of SARS-CoV-2 exposure. In the case of exposure, with the exception of hydroxyhcloroquine and sulfasalazine, immunosuppression should be held for 2 weeks. Our recommendations and the guidelines we discuss here are based on C-level recommendations but help provide a framework for how to counsel our patients during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Immunosuppression/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatologists/standards , Comorbidity , Humans , Pandemics , Rheumatic Diseases/complications , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology
11.
Orv Hetil ; 161(33): 1355-1362, 2020 08.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706347

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the state of emergency caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the Doctor-patient communication training for medical students at the University of Szeged was moved online. The training is based on the method of video analysis, involving simulated patients, making online implementation extremely challenging. AIM: The study aims to present our experiences with the online training and to analyse the students' evaluations. METHOD: We used the free version of Zoom for small groups of five students, a trainer and a simulated patient. All students participated in a situation that we recorded. The viewing of the recordings was followed by group discussion. Then, the students evaluated the course using an online questionnaire. We used descriptive statistics and content analysis. RESULTS: 74.4% of the students (n = 64) completed the questionnaire. 78.1-100% of them gave a good (4) or excellent (5) evaluation for the questions. The highest average score (4.95 ± 0.21) was given to the professionalism of the trainers, the lowest was given to the choice of topic of the theoretical part (4.06 ± 1.02). The majority of the students were satisfied with the course, they would be happy to attend it again; however, in-person learning still seems to be the preferred option. CONCLUSION: The online practice was a success. In many ways, it proved to be an adequate replacement for the traditional form. The students evaluated the training similarly to those of previous years. The lack of personal contact is a limiting factor, thus, online practice should not be seen as an alternative to personal communication trainings; however, as an independent form of training, it can make a significant contribution to effective, modern education. Orv Hetil. 2020; 161(33): 1355-1362.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Patient Simulation , Physician-Patient Relations , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Clinical Competence , Communication , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
12.
Orv Hetil ; 161(33): 1355-1362, 2020 08.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706346

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the state of emergency caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the Doctor-patient communication training for medical students at the University of Szeged was moved online. The training is based on the method of video analysis, involving simulated patients, making online implementation extremely challenging. AIM: The study aims to present our experiences with the online training and to analyse the students' evaluations. METHOD: We used the free version of Zoom for small groups of five students, a trainer and a simulated patient. All students participated in a situation that we recorded. The viewing of the recordings was followed by group discussion. Then, the students evaluated the course using an online questionnaire. We used descriptive statistics and content analysis. RESULTS: 74.4% of the students (n = 64) completed the questionnaire. 78.1-100% of them gave a good (4) or excellent (5) evaluation for the questions. The highest average score (4.95 ± 0.21) was given to the professionalism of the trainers, the lowest was given to the choice of topic of the theoretical part (4.06 ± 1.02). The majority of the students were satisfied with the course, they would be happy to attend it again; however, in-person learning still seems to be the preferred option. CONCLUSION: The online practice was a success. In many ways, it proved to be an adequate replacement for the traditional form. The students evaluated the training similarly to those of previous years. The lack of personal contact is a limiting factor, thus, online practice should not be seen as an alternative to personal communication trainings; however, as an independent form of training, it can make a significant contribution to effective, modern education. Orv Hetil. 2020; 161(33): 1355-1362.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Patient Simulation , Physician-Patient Relations , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Clinical Competence , Communication , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
14.
Radiology ; 296(2): E46-E54, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697192

ABSTRACT

Background Despite its high sensitivity in diagnosing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in a screening population, the chest CT appearance of COVID-19 pneumonia is thought to be nonspecific. Purpose To assess the performance of radiologists in the United States and China in differentiating COVID-19 from viral pneumonia at chest CT. Materials and Methods In this study, 219 patients with positive COVID-19, as determined with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and abnormal chest CT findings, were retrospectively identified from seven Chinese hospitals in Hunan Province, China, from January 6 to February 20, 2020. Two hundred five patients with positive respiratory pathogen panel results for viral pneumonia and CT findings consistent with or highly suspicious for pneumonia, according to original radiologic interpretation within 7 days of each other, were identified from Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, RI. Three radiologists from China reviewed all chest CT scans (n = 424) blinded to RT-PCR findings to differentiate COVID-19 from viral pneumonia. A sample of 58 age-matched patients was randomly selected and evaluated by four radiologists from the United States in a similar fashion. Different CT features were recorded and compared between the two groups. Results For all chest CT scans (n = 424), the accuracy of the three radiologists from China in differentiating COVID-19 from non-COVID-19 viral pneumonia was 83% (350 of 424), 80% (338 of 424), and 60% (255 of 424). In the randomly selected sample (n = 58), the sensitivities of three radiologists from China and four radiologists from the United States were 80%, 67%, 97%, 93%, 83%, 73%, and 70%, respectively. The corresponding specificities of the same readers were 100%, 93%, 7%, 100%, 93%, 93%, and 100%, respectively. Compared with non-COVID-19 pneumonia, COVID-19 pneumonia was more likely to have a peripheral distribution (80% vs 57%, P < .001), ground-glass opacity (91% vs 68%, P < .001), fine reticular opacity (56% vs 22%, P < .001), and vascular thickening (59% vs 22%, P < .001), but it was less likely to have a central and peripheral distribution (14% vs 35%, P < .001), pleural effusion (4% vs 39%, P < .001), or lymphadenopathy (3% vs 10%, P = .002). Conclusion Radiologists in China and in the United States distinguished coronavirus disease 2019 from viral pneumonia at chest CT with moderate to high accuracy. © RSNA, 2020 Online supplemental material is available for this article. A translation of this abstract in Farsi is available in the supplement. ترجمه چکیده این مقاله به فارسی، در ضمیمه موجود است.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Radiologists/standards , Adult , Aged , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sensitivity and Specificity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
15.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(8): 349-351, 2020 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690559

ABSTRACT

From staffing and supply shortages to furloughs and layoffs, few expected-let alone had a plan for managing-the COVID-19 pandemic. The crisis allowed nursing professional development to demonstrate its value like never before. This article explores the impact of the pandemic on nursing professional development practice at the micro (unit), meso (organization), and macro (national) levels of our specialty. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(8):349-351.].


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Professional Practice , Staff Development/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , Clinical Competence , Educational Measurement , Humans , Needs Assessment , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics
16.
J Contin Educ Health Prof ; 40(2): 74-75, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-687515

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID 19) pandemic has necessitated changes in health care delivery, including increases in delivery of care through asynchronous or virtual means, and deployment of clinicians in different teams and settings. Physical distancing and redeployment of clinicians has also necessitated changes in health care continuing professional development (CPD). Health care delivery and CPD is unlikely to fully return (in the near term, if at all) to pre-pandemic status. The authors raise questions and opportunities for development and provision of CPD during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Clinical Competence , Humans , Telemedicine
17.
Radiography (Lond) ; 26 Suppl 2: S49-S53, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-665633

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Radiologists' image reading skills vary, such variations in image interpretations can influence the effectiveness of the early treatment of disease and may have important clinical and economic implications. In screening mammography, clinical audits are used to assess radiologists' performance annually, however, the nature of these audits prevent robust data analysis due to the low prevalence of breast cancer and the long waiting periods for the audit results. Research-based evidence revealed a need for changes in the methods utilised to optimise the assessment of the efficacy of radiologists' interpretations. METHODS: A cloud-based platform was developed to assess and enhance radiologists' performance help reduce variability in medical image interpretations in a research environment; however, to address a number of limitations, the platform was commercialised to make it available worldwide. RESULTS: DetectED-X's team have been able to make their cloud-based platform available worldwide, tailored to the needs of radiologists and accredited for continuing medical/professional education; thus, changing the continuous professional development practice globally. CONCLUSION: DetectED-X's Rivelato, was developed to address a need for effective, available and affordable educational solutions for clinicians and health care workers wherever they are located. A true fusion of industry, academia, clinics and consumer to adapt to the growing needs of clinicians' around the world, the latest being COVID-19 global pandemic. DetectED-X repurposed its platform to educate physicians around the world on the appearances of COVID-19 on Lung Computed Tomography scans, introducing CovED to clinicians worldwide free of charge as a multi-national consortium of collaboration to help fight COVID-19, showing how research-based evidence can create effective and scalable change globally.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted , Radiology/education , Betacoronavirus , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Mammography , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging
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