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1.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(1): 30-32, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631750

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Covid-19 pandemic limited educational and career development opportunities for medical students, requiring innovative programs to accelerate professional identity formation and clinical skills acquisition. METHODS: We developed a brief coaching intervention that took place over the advanced (sub-internship) emergency medicine rotation at our institution. We trained coaches using a newly developed workshop, who met with students for an average of 4.5 hours over 3 weeks. IMPACT/EFFECTIVENESS: We showed that this coaching program was both feasible and impactful for faculty coaches and medical students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medicine , Mentoring , Students, Medical , Clinical Competence , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Acta Biomed ; 92(S2): e2021329, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625048

ABSTRACT

The SARS-Cov-2 pandemic has restored the attention of policy-makers on the essentiality of Primary Care and the need of the Family and Community Nurses (FCNs), in order to ensure the proactive interception of individuals, families and community needs. In Italy, the Decree-Law no.34 of 19 May 2020 was issued, officially introducing the FCN. Therafter, it has been elaborated the "Address lines of the FCN proposal", starting from the "Position Statement on Family and Community Nurses" of the Italian National Federation of Nursing Professions Orders. In Europe, the ENhANCE (EuropeaN-curriculum-for-fAmily-aNd-Community-nursE) project has defined a standardized professional profile of the FCNs, based on specific Core Competencies. The aim of this work was to investigate and integrate the differences between the two profiles. In order to carry out this comparison, these competencies were compared and integrated with those identified by the Tuning model (TM), which identifies the knowledge, the skills and the attitudes that all newly graduated nurses must have acquired at the end of their education programme. Nine of the eleven italian competencies are included among the twenty-eight competencies of ENhANCE. The same applies to two of three competencies identified in the TM. As a result, this benchmark has resulted in a list of 30 competencies. This benchmark integrates the european profile with the national one, also oriented to their effective applicability in educational setting thanks to the TM. Through this comparison it is possible to develop professional educational projects, in order to standardize the grounding process on the national context.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Europe , Humans , Italy , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 284: 153-157, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606233

ABSTRACT

During COVID-19 pandemic public health measures, face-to-face simulation laboratories were cancelled. A rapid transition to online teaching environments required staff and students to rapid upskilling in digital literacy. The purpose of this article is to describe a model of virtual nursing simulation laboratory implemented in graduate entry to practice Master's nursing program to teach clinical skills. The model used cloud-based communication app Zoom and real time feedback data to improve content delivery, student engagement and confidence in skill development. This model was co-designed with the student cohort to ensure students, as stakeholders, had a voice in having their education needs met during these challenging times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laboratories , Clinical Competence , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(50): e27844, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583963

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, surgical training has become increasingly challenging due to required social distancing. Therefore, the use of virtual reality (VR)-simulation could be a helpful tool for imparting surgical skills, especially in minimally invasive environments. Visual spatial ability (VSA) might influence the learning curve for laparoscopic surgical skills. However, little is known about the influence of VSA for surgical novices on VR-simulator training regarding the complexity of different tasks over a long-term training period. Our study evaluated prior VSA and VSA development in surgical trainees during VR-simulator training, and its influence on surgical performance in simulator training. METHODS: In our single-center prospective two-arm randomized trial, VSA was measured with a tube figure test before curriculum training. After 1:1 randomization, the training group (TG) participated in the entire curriculum training consisting of 48 different VR-simulator tasks with varying difficulty over a continuous nine-day training session. The control group (CG) performed two of these tasks on day 1 and 9. Correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the influence of VSA on VR-related surgical skills and to measure procedural abilities. RESULTS: Sixty students (33 women) were included. Significant improvements in the TG in surgical performance and faster completion times were observed from days 1 to 9 for the scope orientation 30° right-handed (SOR), and cholecystectomy dissection tasks after the structured 9-day training program. After training, the TG with pre-existing low VSA scores achieved performance levels similar to those with pre-existing high VSA scores for the two VR simulator tasks. Significant correlations between VSA and surgical performance on complex laparoscopic camera navigation SOR tasks were found before training. CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed that that all trainees improved their surgical skills irrespective of previous VSA during structured VR simulator training. An increase in VSA resulted in improvements in surgical performance and training progress, which was more distinct in complex simulator tasks. Further, we demonstrated a positive relationship between VSA and surgical performance of the TG, especially at the beginning of training. Our results identified pre-existing levels of VSA as a predictor of surgical performance.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Laparoscopy , Simulation Training , Spatial Navigation , Virtual Reality , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Laparoscopy/education , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , User-Computer Interface
5.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261286, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581754

ABSTRACT

The Government of Pakistan has established Adult Vaccination Counters (AVCs) to immunize general population with COVID-19 vaccine. Different brands of COVID-19 vaccines have different protocols. It is important that the knowledge and skills of the vaccination staff at AVCs should be accurate. To assess this, a cross-sectional study was conducted in all 15 AVCs at Khyber Pakhtunkhwa's provincial capital in May 2021, using the simulated client approach. Structured open-ended and simulated scenario-based questions were used to collect data from the vaccination staff of AVCs. This study showed that 53.3% of the AVCs had at most three out of four brands of COVID-19 vaccines. 60% of the AVCs did not have the mechanism to track client's vaccine first dose, date, and brand. Only 66.7% of the AVCs had a complete knowledge of all the available vaccines. 86.7% and 80% of the AVCs knew the correct duration and administration of the same brand of COVID-19 vaccine's second dose respectively. At the client's end, 6.7% were aware about the brand of administered COVID-19 vaccine. 46.7% were advised about the date of the second shot of vaccination. Only 13.3% of the clients were informed about the procedure of getting an official vaccination certificate. It was concluded that the knowledge and skill of the vaccination staff at AVCs is inadequate. Every vaccine has a different protocol in terms of number of doses and duration. AVCs must have a tracking system to inoculate the second dose with the same brand as the first dose. There is a need for rigorous monitoring and training of the COVID-19 vaccination staff on various protocols of vaccine to prevent losing public's trust.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/education , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vaccination , Vaccines/administration & dosage
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 12 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: To avoid the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical clerkship, supplemental teachings such as digital materials in the scenario-based distal simulations were implemented. This study utilized the OSCE (objective-structured clinical examination) to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the learning outcome of medical students from the regular group (class of 2020) and pandemic-impacted group (class of 2021). METHODS: All medical students serially took, firstly, the mock-OSCE, secondly, the mock-OSCE, and the national OSCE. Then, the serial OSCE scores were compared between groups. RESULTS: Although with similar scores in the first mock OSCE, the regular group (n = 78) had a higher average score in the national OSCE than the pandemic-impacted group (n = 80) (872.18 vs. 834.96, p = 0.003). In terms of improvement, the performances of the regular group were also better than the pandemic-impacted group between the second mock OSCE and the national OSCE (79.10 vs. 38.14, p = 0.014), and between the second mock OSCE and the national OSCE (125.11 vs. 77.52, p = 0.003). While separating distinct genres, the regular group had more of a score increment in standardized patient-based stations between the second mock OSCE and the national OSCE (regular vs. pandemic-impacted: 57.03 vs. 18.95, p = 0.003), as well as between the first mock OSCE and the national OSCE (75.97 vs. 26.36, p < 0.001), but there was no significant difference among the skill-based stations. In particular, the scores of the emergency medicine associated station in the national OSCE of the pandemic-impacted group was lower. CONCLUSIONS: Our study implies that the pandemic significantly hampered the learning outcomes of final year medical students in their clinical participation. Especially facing the COVID-19 pandemic, more supplemental teachings are needed to compensate the decreasing emergency medicine exposure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Clinical Competence , Educational Measurement , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Taiwan/epidemiology
7.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1892017, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575053

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Telesimulation may allow simulationists to continue with essential simulation-based training programs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hence, we investigated the feasibility of telesimulation for neonatal resuscitation training, assessed participants' attitudes towards telesimulation as well as its effect on neonatal resuscitation knowledge, and compared results between medical students and neonatal nurses. Methods: For this prospective observational pilot study, medical students and neonatal nursing staff were recruited on a voluntary basis. Pre- and post-training knowledge was assessed using a 20-question questionnaire. Following the educational intervention, participants further answered a six-item questionnaire on their perception of telesimulation. For the telesimulation session, participants received a simulation package including a low-fidelity mannequin and medical equipment. The one-hour telesimulation session was delivered by an experienced instructor and broadcasted via Cisco Webex for groups of 2-3 participants, covering all elements of the neonatal resuscitation algorithm and including deliberate technical skills practice. Results: Nine medical students and nine neonatal nurses participated in a total of seven telesimulation sessions. In general, participants enjoyed the telesimulation session, acknowledged a positive learning effect and found telesimulation suitable for neonatal resuscitation training, but were critical of potential technical issues, training logistics, and the quality of supervision and feedback. Neonatal resuscitation knowledge scores increased significantly after the educational intervention both for medical students and nurses. Conclusions: Telesimulation is feasible for neonatal resuscitation training and associated with significant improvements in knowledge of current resuscitation guidelines, without differences between medical students and neonatal nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Resuscitation/education , Simulation Training/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1899642, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574515

ABSTRACT

Background: During the current COVID-19 pandemic, offline clinical education was mandated to suspend at the neurology department of many teaching hospitals globally, yet there is insufficient evidence regarding the preferred practice and methods for online neurology intern training course.Objective: The investigation aimed to examine whether the online neurology training course based on Small Private Online Course (SPOC) and blending learning mode can achieve a good effect and cater for interns from different medical programs and whether the learning group size affects the teaching effect.Design: The subjects were 92 students enrolled in the neurology internship at the Second Xiangya Hospital of China from 9 March to 9 August 2020. After completing the online course, the final scores and evaluation results were compared among different groups of interns, and their preference to distinct contents of the course was analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS program (version 22.0).Results: Our online course received consistent positive recognition from the interns. Ninety-nine percent of the interns recommended incorporating the online course into the conventional offline training program after the pandemic. There was no significant difference between interns from different programs concerning the final scores and course evaluation. A smaller learning group size (<15 students) could achieve a better teaching effect than a larger group size (p < 0.05). The interns preferred interactive discussions, and course contents that they can get practice and feedback from, rather than video watching and didactic lectures.Conclusions: The online neurology intern training course based on SPOC and blending learning mode is worthy of popularization in a large student base. The teaching effect of an online intern training program may be improved by limiting the group size to less than 15 students and encouraging more interactive discussion, more practice and feedback.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Neurology/education , China/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Group Processes , Humans , Inservice Training , Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e24266, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574391

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Transition to digital pathology usually takes months or years to be completed. We were familiarizing ourselves with digital pathology solutions at the time when the COVID-19 outbreak forced us to embark on an abrupt transition to digital pathology. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to quantitatively describe how the abrupt transition to digital pathology might affect the quality of diagnoses, model possible causes by probabilistic modeling, and qualitatively gauge the perception of this abrupt transition. METHODS: A total of 17 pathologists and residents participated in this study; these participants reviewed 25 additional test cases from the archives and completed a final psychologic survey. For each case, participants performed several different diagnostic tasks, and their results were recorded and compared with the original diagnoses performed using the gold standard method (ie, conventional microscopy). We performed Bayesian data analysis with probabilistic modeling. RESULTS: The overall analysis, comprising 1345 different items, resulted in a 9% (117/1345) error rate in using digital slides. The task of differentiating a neoplastic process from a nonneoplastic one accounted for an error rate of 10.7% (42/392), whereas the distinction of a malignant process from a benign one accounted for an error rate of 4.2% (11/258). Apart from residents, senior pathologists generated most discrepancies (7.9%, 13/164). Our model showed that these differences among career levels persisted even after adjusting for other factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are in line with previous findings, emphasizing that the duration of transition (ie, lengthy or abrupt) might not influence the diagnostic performance. Moreover, our findings highlight that senior pathologists may be limited by a digital gap, which may negatively affect their performance with digital pathology. These results can guide the process of digital transition in the field of pathology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Diagnostic Imaging/standards , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/standards , Pathology, Clinical/methods , Pathology, Clinical/standards , Bayes Theorem , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Microscopy , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
J Grad Med Educ ; 13(6): 848-857, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575014

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic displaced newly matched emergency medicine "pre-interns" from in-person educational experiences at the end of medical school. This called for novel remote teaching modalities. Objective: This study assesses effectiveness of a multisite Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) sub-competency-based curricular implementation on Slack during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Methods: Emergency medicine residency programs were recruited via national organization listservs. Programs designated instructors to manage communications and teaching for the senior medical students who had matched to their programs (pre-interns) in spring/summer 2020. Pre- and post-surveys of trainees and instructors assessed perceived preparedness for residency, perceived effectiveness of common virtual educational modalities, and concern for the pandemic's effects on medical education utilizing a Likert scale of 1 (very unconcerned) to 5 (very concerned). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the t test. Results: Of 276 possible residency programs, 28 enrolled. Of 324 possible pre-interns, 297 (91.7%) completed pre-surveys in April/May and 249 (76.9%) completed post-surveys in June/July. The median weeks since performing a physical examination was 8 (IQR 7-12), since attending in-person didactics was 10 (IQR 8-15) and of rotation displacement was 4 (IQR 2-6). Perceived preparedness increased both overall and for 14 of 21 ACGME Milestone topics taught. Instructors reported higher mean concern (4.32, 95% CI 4.23-4.41) than pre-interns (2.88, 95% CI 2.74-3.02) regarding the pandemic's negative effects on medical education. Conclusions: Pre-interns reported improvements in residency preparedness after participating in this ACGME sub-competency-based curriculum on Slack.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medicine , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical , Accreditation , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Graduate , Emergency Medicine/education , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
11.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1597-1602, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572703

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 was declared a pandemic in March 2020, requiring a comprehensive response from all healthcare systems, including Mexico's. As medical residents' training did not involve epidemic response, we decided to evaluate their level of training on this subject, specifically self-perceived knowledge level and capacity to respond to epidemiological crises. METHODOLOGY: Medical residents from two hospitals belonging to PEMEX (Mexico's state-owned petroleum company) were included in a cross-sectional study. All participants answered a modified version of the survey developed by the University of Lovaina's Center for Research and Education in Emergency Care. Participants were analyzed according to their relevant "clinical" or "surgical" residency tracks. Data were analyzed using through Chi-square tests, t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients with significance established at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Of a total of 94 resident participants in this study, 56.7% self-perceived themselves as being poorly prepared to confront the pandemic. Only 25.5% of the participants referred previous experience in medical responses to public health emergencies, and only 35.1% reported ever receiving education on this topic. CONCLUSIONS: Medical residents-who have been involved with caring for victims of the pandemic-are under the general perception that they are not prepared, experienced, or educated enough to respond to such a widespread massive public health emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Internship and Residency , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital , Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Anesth Analg ; 133(5): 1331-1341, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566542

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic interrupted the administration of the APPLIED Examination, the final part of the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) staged examination system for initial certification. In response, the ABA developed, piloted, and implemented an Internet-based "virtual" form of the examination to allow administration of both components of the APPLIED Exam (Standardized Oral Examination and Objective Structured Clinical Examination) when it was impractical and unsafe for candidates and examiners to travel and have in-person interactions. This article describes the development of the ABA virtual APPLIED Examination, including its rationale, examination format, technology infrastructure, candidate communication, and examiner training. Although the logistics are formidable, we report a methodology for successfully introducing a large-scale, high-stakes, 2-element, remote examination that replicates previously validated assessments.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Certification/methods , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Specialty Boards , Anesthesiology/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Certification/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Computer-Assisted Instruction/standards , Educational Measurement/standards , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/standards , Specialty Boards/standards , United States/epidemiology
13.
J Health Organ Manag ; 35(9): 195-210, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561215

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study seeks to improve the understanding of physician leaders' leadership work challenges. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The subjects of the empirical study were physician leaders (n = 23) in the largest central hospital in Finland. FINDINGS: A total of five largely identity-related, partially paradoxical dilemmas appeared regarding why working as "just a leader" is challenging for physician leaders. First, the dilemma of identity ambiguity between being a physician and a leader. Second, the dilemma of balancing the expected commitment to clinical patient work by various stakeholders and that of physician leadership work. Third, the dilemma of being able to compensate for leadership skill shortcomings by excelling in clinical skills, encouraging physician leaders to commit to patient work. Fourth, the dilemma of "medic discourse", that is, downplaying leadership work as "non-patient work", making it inferior to patient work. Fifth, the dilemma of a perceived ethical obligation to commit to patient work even if the physician leadership work would be a full-time job. The first two issues support the findings of earlier research, while the remaining three emerging from the authors' analysis are novel. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The authors list some of the practical implications that follow from this study and which could help solve some of the challenges. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This study explores physician leaders' leadership work challenges using authentic physician leader data in a context where no prior empirical research has been carried out.


Subject(s)
Leadership , Physicians , Clinical Competence , Employment , Finland , Humans
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 585, 2021 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526627

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, the need for palliative care will increase as a result of the ageing of populations and the rising burden of cancer, non-communicable diseases as well as some communicable diseases. Physicians and registered nurses working in palliative care should have a sufficient level of education and competence in managing the changing needs and requirements of palliative care. There is, however, need for evidence-based palliative care training and education of physicians and registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to describe the views of physicians and registered nurses regarding future competence needs within palliative care. METHODS: The study was conducted through use of a cross-sectional qualitative design. A total of 54 physicians and 110 registered nurses completed an open-ended questionnaire about the future competence needs of palliative care. The data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. RESULTS: The results revealed four main competence needs within palliative care for the coming decade: palliative care competence at all levels within healthcare and social welfare services; individualized palliative care competence; person-centered encounters competence; and systematic competence development within palliative care. CONCLUSIONS: The results offer cues for education and professional development, which can be used to support physicians and registered nurses when future palliative care competences are included in educational programs. Seamless cooperation between palliative care services and educational institutions is recommended to ensure that undergraduate and postgraduate education is based on a continuous assessment of competence requirements within the field of palliative care. Therefore, online multi-professional simulations, for example, could be used to enhance future competencies within palliative care; undergraduate medical, nursing and allied healthcare students as well as postgraduate palliative care professionals and experts of experience could work together during simulations.


Subject(s)
Nurses , Physicians , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Palliative Care
15.
BMJ Open ; 11(11): e054746, 2021 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526505

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate a simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum for cricothyrotomy using wet towels to suppress aerosolisation during a pandemic. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental, pre-post study. SETTING: Tertiary care, academic medical centre in Chicago. PARTICIPANTS: Ear, nose and throat and general surgery residents, fellows and attendings. INTERVENTION: Cricothyroidotomy simulation-based mastery learning curriculum. OUTCOMES MEASURE: Pretest to posttest simulated cricothyrotomy skills checklist performance. RESULTS: 37 of 41 eligible surgeons participated in the curriculum. Median pretest score was 72.5 (IQR 55.0-80.0) and 100.0 (IQR 98.8-100.0) for the posttest p<0.001. All participants scored at or above a minimum passing standard (93% checklist items correct) at posttest. CONCLUSIONS: Using SBML is effective to quickly train clinicians to competently perform simulated cricothyrotomy during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Academic Medical Centers , Clinical Competence , Cohort Studies , Curriculum , Humans
16.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 13(11): 1498-1502, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525752

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In-person Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) are used as assessments in most pharmacy programs, however, reports of virtual OSCEs and skills assessments are limited. With a pivot to virtual OSCEs necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to consider core competencies assessed as well as logistics, technology, and other factors. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY AND SETTING: The virtual redesign of a Capstone OSCE for third professional year pharmacy students at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. FINDINGS: Core components of pivoting an in-person Capstone OSCE to virtual included an initial assessment of what was planned, what competencies were being assessed, and how this could be accomplished in the virtual realm. Key stakeholders such as students, testing and evaluation services, and faculty were included in the planning process. In addition to changes in OSCE delivery, grading processes and remediation were also modified. SUMMARY: This Capstone OSCE merged virtual education and skills-based assessments together out of necessity and provides an example of flexibility and nimbleness in times of great change. Although further assessment is needed, processes used and lessons learned are helpful for future, intentional planning of virtual or partially virtual skills assessments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Pharmacy , Clinical Competence , Educational Measurement , Faculty, Pharmacy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 76: 28-37, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525690

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the cancellation of in-person testing across the country. We sought to understand the feasibility of conducting virtual oral examinations as well as solicit opinions of vascular surgery program directors (PD) regarding the use of virtual platforms to conduct both low stakes mock oral examinations with their trainees and potentially "real" high stakes certifying examinations (CE) moving forward. METHODS: Forty-four senior vascular surgery trainees from 17 institutions took part in a virtual mock oral examination conducted by 38 practicing vascular surgeons via Zoom. Each examination lasted 30 minutes with four clinical scenarios. An anonymous survey pertaining to the conduct of the examination and opinions on feasibility of using virtual examinations for the vascular surgery CE was sent to all examiners and examinees. A similar survey was sent to all vascular surgery program directors. RESULTS: The overall pass rate was 82% (36/44 participants) with no correlation with training paradigm. 32/44 (73%) of trainees, 29/38 (76%) of examiners and 49/103 (48%) of PDs completed the surveys. Examinees and examiners thought the experience was beneficial and PDs also thought the experience would be beneficial for their trainees. While the majority of trainees and examiners believed they were able to communicate and express (or evaluate) knowledge and confidence as easily virtually as in person, PDs were less likely to agree confidence could be assessed virtually. The majority of respondents thought the CE of the Vascular Surgery Board of the American Board of Surgery could be offered virtually, although no groups thought virtual exams were superior to in person exams. While cost benefit was perceived in virtual examinations, the security of the examination was a concern. CONCLUSIONS: Performing virtual mock oral examinations for vascular surgery trainees is feasible. Both vascular surgery trainees as well as PDs feel that virtual CEs should be considered by the Vascular Surgery Board.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Certification , Education, Medical, Graduate , Educational Measurement , Internship and Residency , Surgeons/education , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education , Clinical Competence , Educational Status , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Test Taking Skills , Verbal Behavior
19.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(4): Doc81, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523662

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the pandemic-related restrictions in classroom teaching at the medical faculties of the LMU Munich and the University of Basel, teaching methods with standardized patients (SPs), were shifted to a digital, web-based format at short notice as of April 2020. We report on our experiences with the WebEncounter program, which was used for the first time in German-speaking countries. The program enables one-to-one encounters between SPs and students. Students receive an invitational email with brief instructions and background information on the case. SPs use case-specific criteria that are compliant with the learning objectives for digital evaluation during the encounter. A feedback session takes place immediately following the encounter. The SPs address the didactically relevant sections and can illustrate them with the corresponding video sequences. Finally, the students receive the links to the video recordings of the encounter and the feedback unit by email. Project description: The aim of this pilot study was to analyze the practicability of the program and its acceptance by students and SPs. In addition, we examined whether the operationalization of the learning objectives in the form of assessment items has an impact on the content and thematic development of courses in the area of doctor-patient communication. Methods: To implement the program, patient cases previously tested in communication seminars in Munich and Basel were rewritten and case-specific evaluation criteria were developed. SPs were trained to use the program, to present their patient figure online and to give feedback. The experience of those involved (faculty, SPs and SP trainers, students) in implementing the program was documented at various levels. The frequency and causes of technical problems were described. Student results on the patient cases and on the feedback items were collected quantitatively and, where possible, supplemented by free-text statements. Results: Data from 218/220 students in Basel and 120/127 students in Munich were collected and evaluated. Students were very satisfied with the patient cases, the encounter with the SPs and their feedback: 3.81±0.42. SPs experienced the training as an increase in their competence and the structured feedback as particularly positive. The training effort per SP was between 2.5 and 4 hours. The results show predominantly normally-distributed, case-specific sum scores of the evaluation criteria. The analysis of the individual assessment items refers to learning objectives that students find difficult to achieve (e.g. explicitly structuring the conversation). Problems in the technical implementation (<10 percent of the encounters) were due mainly to the use of insufficient hardware or internet connection problems. The need to define case-specific evaluation criteria triggered a discussion in the group of study directors about learning objectives and their operationalization. Summary: Web-based encounters can be built into the ongoing communication curriculum with reasonable effort. Training the SPs and heeding the technical requirements are of central importance. Practicing the virtual consultation was evaluated very positively by the students - in particular, the immediate feedback in the protected dialogue was appreciated by all involved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Physician-Patient Relations , Remote Consultation , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Feedback , Germany , Humans , Internet , Pilot Projects , Remote Consultation/standards , Switzerland
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