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1.
Orthopadie (Heidelb) ; 52(7): 539-546, 2023 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240037

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The classic paradigm of "learning on the patient in the operating room" is more and more in conflict with the growing requirements of cost-efficient work and patient safety. With the technology available today for simulator systems, the accessibility of digital tools and the development of a metaverse as a digital meeting place result in various application scenarios and alternatives to classic orthopedic training. SIMULATORS: First VR-desktop simulations in orthopedics and traumatology were developed more than 20 years ago. VR-desktop simulators consist of a computer with a video screen and a joint model. Different instruments can be paired with this system and allow haptic feedback. With innovative software, numerous training programs can be selected, and the user receives precise feedback on their performance. Immersive VR simulators have also played an increasingly important role in recent years. OTHER DIGITAL TOOLS: The use of digital media such as audio and video podcasts as learning and information sources increased in the context of COVID-19. There is also an increasing number of orthopedic and trauma surgery topics on social media platforms. In all fields, however, there is a risk of the spread of misinformation. A quality standard must be maintained. EFFECTIVENESS AND UTILITY OF THE TRAINING: In order to evaluate simulators and their value as a training tool, it is important to comply with various validity criteria. Transfer validity plays an essential role for clinical application. Various studies demonstrate that the skills learned on simulators can also be successfully transferred to real clinical scenarios. DISCUSSION: A lack of availability, costs and high effort are limitations of classic training methods. In contrast, there are versatile use cases of VR-based simulations that are individually adapted to the trainees and cannot endanger patients. The still high acquisition costs, technical obstacles and the not yet widespread availability are limiting factors. The metaverse still offers unimaginable possibilities today to transfer VR-based applications to experimental learning methods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedics , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Internet , User-Computer Interface , Clinical Competence , COVID-19/epidemiology
2.
Korean J Med Educ ; 35(2): 187-198, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236740

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The development of students' clinical reasoning skills should be a consideration in the design of instruction and evaluation in medical education. In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, several changes in the medical curriculum have been implemented in promoting clinical reasoning. This study aims to explore medical students' perceptions and experiences with the clinical reasoning curriculum during the COVID-19 pandemic and determine their skills development. METHODS: The study used a mixed-method design with a concurrent approach. A cross-sectional study was conducted to compare and examine the relationship between the outcomes of the structured oral examination (SOE) and the Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI). Then, the qualitative method was used. A focus group discussion using a semi-structured interview guide with open-ended questions was conducted, then the verbatim transcript was subjected to thematic analysis. RESULTS: There is an increase in SOE and DTI scores between second-year to fourth-year students. The diagnostic thinking domains and SOE are significantly correlated (r=0.302, 0.313, and 0.241 with p<0.05). The three primary themes from the qualitative analysis are perceptions regarding clinical reasoning, clinical reasoning activities, and the learning component. CONCLUSION: Even if students are still studying throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, their clinical reasoning skills can improve. The clinical reasoning and diagnostic thinking skills of medical students increase as the length of the school year increases. Online case-based learning and assessment support the development of clinical reasoning skills. The skills are supported in their development by positive attitudes toward faculty, peers, case type, and prior knowledge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Clinical Competence , Clinical Reasoning
3.
Rev Med Chil ; 150(10): 1325-1333, 2022 Oct.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236147

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The adoption of sanitary measures due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic hampered teaching and learning methods in medicine. AIM: To communicate the results of a wound suture training workshop, based on the Basic Procedural Skills Training methodology and adapted to the pandemic context. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred fourteen students were randomized in small groups due to sanitary measures and trained with a modification of the Basic Procedural Skills Training methodology. An informed consent was obtained from every student. The suturing skills were evaluated before and after the intervention with "The Objective Structured Assessment Of Technical Skills" (OSATS) instrument. The perception of the workshop and the implementation of the COVID-19 prevention measures were also evaluated. RESULTS: The students showed a statistically significant improvement after the intervention. In the OSATS verification list, the average score increased from 4.5 to 8.6 (p < 0.01). In the OSATS global scale, the average score increased from 13.0 to 25.3 (p < 0.01). The perception of the workshop and the prevention measures were well evaluated. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the limitations of the pandemic context, we achieved a significant improvement after the intervention and a very good perception by the students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Clinical Competence , Educational Measurement/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Br J Nurs ; 32(11): 522-525, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233550

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization (2019) has determined that patient safety is a global public health challenge. In UK clinical areas, policies and procedures are in place for the safe prescribing and delivery of blood and blood product transfusions, yet patient safety incidences continue. Undergraduate nurse education and training may provide the underlying knowledge to practitioners, while postgraduate standalone training sessions support skill development. However, over time, without regular experience, competence will diminish. Nursing students may have little exposure to transfusion practice and COVID-19 may have exacerbated this challenge with a reduction in placement availability. The use of simulation to support theory with follow-up and ongoing drop-in training sessions may help to inform practitioners and improve patient safety in the management and delivery of blood and blood product transfusion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Nurses , Humans , Blood Transfusion , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Patient Safety , Clinical Competence
5.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(3): 622-632, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232021

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study is to determine nurses' disaster core competency levels, compare them based on characteristics and examine the relationships with psychological resilience. BACKGROUND: Since nurses constitute a critical part in the health care services, it is important to understand the competencies and effective factors in their disaster preparedness. METHODS: The data were collected from 489 nurses between January and February 2021 with an introductory information form, the Nurses' Perceptions of Disaster Core Competencies Scale and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. RESULTS: The nurses' level of disaster core competencies was above the average, and it was positively correlated with their psychological resilience. The nurses' disaster experiences made higher differences on their disaster core competencies when compared to their personal and professional characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to provide disaster training and drills to all nurses on a regular basis. However, under disaster conditions, resilience should also be considered and included in the preparation plans for nurses to support their professional competencies and qualifications. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers should play a leadership role in planning disaster preparedness training for nurses, and these trainings should be addressed to cover both professional competencies and resilience for nurses to respond effectively to disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Disasters , Nurse Administrators , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Turkey
6.
Global Health ; 19(1): 28, 2023 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326880

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In The Netherlands, physicians specialized in global health and tropical medicine (Ps-GHTM) are trained to work in low-resource settings (LRS) after their training program of 27 months. After working for a period of time in LRS, many Ps-GHTM continue their careers in the Dutch healthcare system. While there is limited evidence regarding the value of international health experience for medical students and residents, it is unknown to what extent this applies to Ps-GHTM and to their clinical practice in the Netherlands. METHODS: In this qualitative study we conducted semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions (FGDs) with Ps-GHTM to explore the perceived applicability of their experience abroad for their subsequent return to the Netherlands. Topic guides were developed using literature about the applicability of working abroad. Findings from the interviews served as a starting point for FGDs. The interviews and FGDs were analysed using directed content analysis. RESULTS: 15 themes are described relating experience abroad to healthcare delivery in The Netherlands: broad medical perspective, holistic perspective, adaptive communication skills, creativity, flexibility, cultural awareness, self-reliance, clinical competence, cost awareness, public health, leadership, open-mindedness, organization of care, self-development, and teamwork. Highlighting the variety in competencies and the complexity of the topic, not all themes were recognized by all respondents in the FGDs nor deemed equally relevant. Flexibility, cultural awareness and holistic perspective are examples of important benefits to work experience in LRS. CONCLUSION: Ps-GHTM bring their competencies to LRS and return to the Netherlands with additionally developed skills and knowledge. These may contribute to healthcare delivery in the Netherlands. This reciprocal value is an important factor for the sustainable development of global health. Identifying the competencies derived from work experience in LRS could give stakeholders insight into the added value of Ps-GHTM and partly help in refining the specialization program.


Subject(s)
Physicians , Tropical Medicine , Humans , Global Health , Clinical Competence , Delivery of Health Care
7.
Eval Program Plann ; 99: 102317, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324915

ABSTRACT

One of the biggest challenges environmental education (EE) practitioners face is having timely and systematically-collected evaluation data to inform the design and improvement of existing programs. One potential way to provide systematic evaluations of programs and build evaluation capacity for practitioners is through a facilitated community of practice (CoP). We developed a CoP involving 37 organizations who were pivoting to online EE programs within the United States due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our goals were to build organizational capacity in evaluation and adaptive management to improve these organizations' online EE programs. We describe our CoP design, challenges associated with its implementation, and the benefits reported by participants in the CoP. Participants reported that they improved their evaluation skills and attitudes towards evaluation and developed social capital with a new network of colleagues. They also reported positive changes in practice, both individually and organizationally; considered new outcomes for their programs; and learned about using evaluation data to systematically improve programs. Educators shared their learning both within and outside of their organizations. Those who were more regularly involved in this community reported more positive benefits than others who were less involved. We share our reflections on the process and make suggestions for other evaluators to consider in similar CoP designs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , United States , Pandemics/prevention & control , Program Evaluation , Clinical Competence , Attitude
8.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 325, 2023 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antenatal counseling for parents in the setting of expected preterm delivery is an important component of pediatric training. However, healthcare professionals receive a variable amount and quality of formal training. This study evaluated and discussed validity of a practical tool to assess antenatal counseling skills and provide evaluative feedback: the Antenatal Counseling Milestones Scale (ACoMS). METHODS: Experts in antenatal counseling developed an anchored milestone-based tool to evaluate observable skills. Study participants with a range of antenatal counseling skills were recruited to participate in simulation of counseling sessions in person or via video with standardized patient actors presenting with preterm labor at 23 weeks' gestation. Two faculty observers scored each session independently using the ACoMS. Participants completed an ACoMS self-assessment, demographic, and feedback survey. Validity was measured with weighted kappas for inter-rater agreement, Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests for milestone levels between degrees of expertise in counseling, and cronbach's alpha for item consistency. RESULTS: Forty-two participants completed observed counseling sessions. Of the 17 items included in the tool, 15 items were statistically significant with scores scaling with level of training. A majority of elements had fair-moderate agreement between raters, and there was high internal consistency amongst all items. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that the internal structure of the ACoMS rubric has greater than fair inter-rater reliability and high internal consistency amongst items. Content validity is supported by the scale's ability to discern level of training. Application of the ACoMS to clinical encounters is needed to determine utility in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Counseling , Pregnancy , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Female , Child , Reproducibility of Results , Educational Measurement , Health Personnel
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 364, 2023 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325968

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pandemic disruptions to medical education worldwide resulted in rapid adaptations to clinical skills learning. These adaptations included moving most teaching to the online environment, decreasing the accepted "hands-on" methods of teaching and learning. While studies have shown significant impacts on student confidence in skills acquisition, there is a paucity of assessment outcome studies which would contribute a valuable perspective on whether measurable deficits were incurred. Here, a preclinical (Year 2) cohort was investigated for clinical skills learning impacts that could influence their transition to hospital-based placements. METHODS: A sequential mixed methods approach was used on the Year 2 Medicine cohort, including: focus group discussions with thematic analysis; a survey derived from the themes observed; and a cohort comparison of the clinical skills examination results of the disrupted Year 2 cohort, compared to pre-pandemic cohorts. RESULTS: Students reported experiencing benefits and disadvantages of the shift to online learning, including a decrease in confidence in their skills acquisition. End of year summative clinical assessments showed non-inferior outcomes when compared to previous cohorts for the majority of clinical skills. However, for procedural skills (venepuncture) the disrupted cohort had significantly lower scores compared to a pre-pandemic cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Rapid innovation during the COVID-19 pandemic provided the opportunity to compare online asynchronous hybrid clinical skills learning with the usual practice of face-to-face synchronous experiential learning. In this study, students' reported perceptions and assessment performance data indicate that careful selection of skills suitable for online teaching, supported by timetabled "hands-on" sessions and ample practice opportunities, is likely to provide non-inferior outcomes for clinical skills learning in students about to transition to clinical placements. The findings can be used to inform clinical skills curriculum designs that incorporate the virtual environment, and assist with future-proofing skills teaching in the case of further catastrophic disruptions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Clinical Competence , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Learning
10.
Nurs Open ; 10(8): 5008-5016, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317765

ABSTRACT

AIM: This article aims to discuss how clinical supervision is an important approach in supporting frontline nurses and students during and post COVID-19 through the lens of the nursing metaparadigms. DESIGN: Discussion article. METHODS: Discourse of the literature considering the importance of working collaboratively with healthcare and educational organisations in operationalising clinical supervision. RESULTS: The evidence base supporting clinical supervision as an effective support strategy for nurses exists, however, its implementation and practice has become sporadic. A resurgence is required to support student's and nurse's during this pandemic. It is timely for nurse educators to creatively engage with clinical partners in supporting clinical supervision to enhance both nurses and students pandemic practice experiences. Clinical supervision is proposed as one strategy to support and guide both nurses and students to develop, strengthen and challenge the effectiveness of their care during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Preceptorship , Delivery of Health Care , Clinical Competence
11.
J Hosp Infect ; 137: 54-60, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316068

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses are the first point of contact for patients and are responsible for monitoring and reporting signs of infection. The COVID-19 pandemic cemented nurses' leadership role in infection prevention. Despite this, nurses' contribution to antimicrobial stewardship initiatives remains under-recognized. AIM: To determine how paediatric nurses understood their role and contribution to antimicrobial stewardship and infection prevention and control practices in three different acute paediatric wards. METHODS: Forty-three nurses were recruited from an adolescent ward, an oncology ward, and a surgical ward in a metropolitan tertiary children's hospital for a qualitative exploratory descriptive study. FINDINGS: Thematic and content analysis derived three themes from the data: understanding of preventable infections; embracing evidence-based guidelines to protect the patient; and roles in preventing and controlling infections and antimicrobial stewardship. Associated subthemes were: desensitized to COVID-19; understanding infection prevention and control precautions; correct use of hospital policy and guidelines; restrictions associated with the use of electronic medical records; understanding of sepsis management and the importance of timely microbiological testing; ambivalence on antimicrobial stewardship roles; and high priority placed on consumer education. CONCLUSION: Nurses' understanding of their role focused on practices such as performing hand hygiene, standard precautions, and reporting the use of high-risk antimicrobials. A lack of understanding of paediatric COVID-19 transmission and presentations was also reported. Education on best practice in infection prevention and AMS was recognized as crucial for both nurses and parents.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Stewardship , COVID-19 , Humans , Child , Adolescent , Clinical Competence , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Qualitative Research
12.
J Korean Acad Nurs ; 53(2): 145-154, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313732

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study investigated clinical competency, COVID-19-related anxiety, coping strategies, self-efficacy, and perceived stress among graduating nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey. Participants were recruited from universities located in four major cities in South Korea. General demographic information, clinical competency, self-efficacy, perceived stress, COVID-19-related anxiety, and coping strategies were assessed using reliable questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, correlations, and multiple regression tests were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: The mean clinical competency, self-efficacy, perceived stress, adaptive coping, and maladaptive coping were 138.16 ± 18.34, 83.85 ±14.02, 21.37 ± 5.79, 53.15 ± 4.64, and 30.98 ± 6.73, respectively. COVID-19-related anxiety was reported by 4.3% of participants. Clinical competency was significantly positively correlated with self-efficacy (r = .44, p < .001) and adaptive coping (r = .20, p = .035) and was significantly negatively correlated with maladaptive coping (r = .20, p = .035). The predictors of clinical competency were self-efficacy (ß = .434, p < .001) and adaptive coping (ß = .173, p < .039), which explained 23% of the variance in clinical competency. CONCLUSION: Self-efficacy and adaptive coping strategies are significant predictors of clinical competence during the pandemic. Planning and implementing various curricular and non-curricular activities to increase senior students' self-efficacy and adaptive coping strategies will help prepare competent nursing graduates for the pandemic when they enter the nursing workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Clinical Competence , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological
14.
Acta Paediatr ; 112(8): 1783-1789, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312147

ABSTRACT

AIM: The Covid-19 pandemic necessitated virtual adaptation of the neonatal resuscitation programme Helping Babies Breathe (HBB). This study assessed one such virtually mentored and flipped classroom modification in Madagascar. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in September 2021 and May 2022. Healthcare providers were identified by local collaborating organisations. United States-based master trainers collaborated with local trainers on virtually mentored trainings followed by independent trainings. Master trainers were available for consultation via Zoom during the virtual training. A flipped classroom modification and traditional didactic method were compared. Primary outcomes were knowledge and skill acquisition, evaluated by written assessments and objective structured clinical examinations. RESULTS: Overall, 97 providers completed the curriculum. Written assessment scores improved in both training models (traditional-74.8% vs 91.5%, p < 0.001; flipped classroom-89.7% vs 93.6%, p < 0.05). There was no significant difference among written assessment scores (92.8% vs 91.5%, p = 0.62) and significantly higher objective structured clinical examination scores (97.3% vs 89.5%, p < 0.001) for the independent training compared to the virtually mentored training. CONCLUSION: The virtually mentored HBB training was followed by a successful independent training as measured by participant knowledge and skill acquisition, supporting the efficacy of virtual dissemination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Madagascar , Pandemics , Resuscitation/education , Clinical Competence , Curriculum
15.
J Korean Acad Nurs ; 53(1): 87-100, 2023 Feb.
Article in Korean | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2309288

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to develop a nursing simulation learning module for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patient-care and examine its effects on clinical reasoning competence, clinical competence, performance confidence, and anxiety in COVID-19 patient care for nursing students. METHODS: A non-equivalent control group pre- and post-test design was employed. The study participants included 47 nursing students (23 in the experimental group and 24 in the control group) from G City. A simulation learning module for COVID-19 patient-care was developed based on the Jeffries simulation model. The module consisted of a briefing, simulation practice, and debriefing. The effects of the simulation module were measured using clinical reasoning competence, clinical competence, performance confidence, and anxiety in COVID-19 patient-care. Data were analyzed using χ²-test, Fisher's exact test, t-test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: The levels of clinical reasoning competence, clinical competence, and performance confidence of the experimental group were significantly higher than that of the control group, and the level of anxiety was significantly low after simulation learning. CONCLUSION: The nursing simulation learning module for COVID-19 patient-care is more effective than the traditional method in terms of improving students' clinical reasoning competence, clinical competence, and performance confidence, and reducing their anxiety. The module is expected to be useful for educational and clinical environments as an effective teaching and learning strategy to empower nursing competency and contribute to nursing education and clinical changes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Humans , Clinical Competence , Anxiety , Patient Care , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods
16.
17.
Anesth Analg ; 132(5): 1338-1343, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302869

ABSTRACT

The negative impacts of sleep deprivation and fatigue have long been recognized. Numerous studies have documented the ill effects of impaired alertness associated with the disruption of the sleep-wake cycle; these include an increased incidence of human error-related accidents, increased morbidity and mortality, and an overall decrement in social, financial, and human productivity. While there are multiple studies on the impact of sleep deprivation and fatigue in resident physicians, far fewer have examined the effects on attending physicians, and only a handful addresses the accumulated effects of chronic sleep disturbances on acute sleep loss during a night call-shift. Moreover, the rapid and unprecedented spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic significantly increased the level of anxiety and stress on the physical, psychological, and the economic well-being of the entire world, with heightened effect on frontline clinicians. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate the emotional and physical toll of the pandemic in clinicians, and its impact on sleep health, general well-being, and performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence/standards , Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology , Sleep Deprivation/psychology , Work Schedule Tolerance/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/psychology , Humans
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 267, 2023 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305302

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, face-to-face teaching and learning of physiotherapy practical skills was limited. Asynchronous, remote training has been effective in development of clinical skills in some health professions. This study aimed to determine the effect of remote, asynchronous training and feedback on development of neurodynamic skills in physiotherapy students. METHODS: Longitudinal repeated measurements study, across four training sessions. Participants engaged in a remote training program for development of upper limb neurodynamic techniques. In this sequential training, participants viewed the online tutorial, practiced independently, and uploaded a video of their performance for formative assessment and feedback from a trained instructor via a checklist and rubric. RESULTS: Intra-subject analyses of 60 third-year physiotherapy students showed that the target standard of performance, with no further significant change in scores, was attained following session 2 for the checklist and session 3 for the rubric. This shows that two sessions are required to learn the procedures, and three sessions yield further improvements in performance quality. CONCLUSION: The remote, asynchronous training and feedback model proved to be an effective strategy for students' development of neurodynamic testing skills and forms a viable alternative to in-person training. This study contributes to the future of acquiring physiotherapy clinical competencies when distance or hybrid practice is required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Feedback , Students , Clinical Competence , Physical Therapy Modalities
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