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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261286, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581754

ABSTRACT

The Government of Pakistan has established Adult Vaccination Counters (AVCs) to immunize general population with COVID-19 vaccine. Different brands of COVID-19 vaccines have different protocols. It is important that the knowledge and skills of the vaccination staff at AVCs should be accurate. To assess this, a cross-sectional study was conducted in all 15 AVCs at Khyber Pakhtunkhwa's provincial capital in May 2021, using the simulated client approach. Structured open-ended and simulated scenario-based questions were used to collect data from the vaccination staff of AVCs. This study showed that 53.3% of the AVCs had at most three out of four brands of COVID-19 vaccines. 60% of the AVCs did not have the mechanism to track client's vaccine first dose, date, and brand. Only 66.7% of the AVCs had a complete knowledge of all the available vaccines. 86.7% and 80% of the AVCs knew the correct duration and administration of the same brand of COVID-19 vaccine's second dose respectively. At the client's end, 6.7% were aware about the brand of administered COVID-19 vaccine. 46.7% were advised about the date of the second shot of vaccination. Only 13.3% of the clients were informed about the procedure of getting an official vaccination certificate. It was concluded that the knowledge and skill of the vaccination staff at AVCs is inadequate. Every vaccine has a different protocol in terms of number of doses and duration. AVCs must have a tracking system to inoculate the second dose with the same brand as the first dose. There is a need for rigorous monitoring and training of the COVID-19 vaccination staff on various protocols of vaccine to prevent losing public's trust.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/education , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vaccination , Vaccines/administration & dosage
2.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(4): Doc81, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523662

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the pandemic-related restrictions in classroom teaching at the medical faculties of the LMU Munich and the University of Basel, teaching methods with standardized patients (SPs), were shifted to a digital, web-based format at short notice as of April 2020. We report on our experiences with the WebEncounter program, which was used for the first time in German-speaking countries. The program enables one-to-one encounters between SPs and students. Students receive an invitational email with brief instructions and background information on the case. SPs use case-specific criteria that are compliant with the learning objectives for digital evaluation during the encounter. A feedback session takes place immediately following the encounter. The SPs address the didactically relevant sections and can illustrate them with the corresponding video sequences. Finally, the students receive the links to the video recordings of the encounter and the feedback unit by email. Project description: The aim of this pilot study was to analyze the practicability of the program and its acceptance by students and SPs. In addition, we examined whether the operationalization of the learning objectives in the form of assessment items has an impact on the content and thematic development of courses in the area of doctor-patient communication. Methods: To implement the program, patient cases previously tested in communication seminars in Munich and Basel were rewritten and case-specific evaluation criteria were developed. SPs were trained to use the program, to present their patient figure online and to give feedback. The experience of those involved (faculty, SPs and SP trainers, students) in implementing the program was documented at various levels. The frequency and causes of technical problems were described. Student results on the patient cases and on the feedback items were collected quantitatively and, where possible, supplemented by free-text statements. Results: Data from 218/220 students in Basel and 120/127 students in Munich were collected and evaluated. Students were very satisfied with the patient cases, the encounter with the SPs and their feedback: 3.81±0.42. SPs experienced the training as an increase in their competence and the structured feedback as particularly positive. The training effort per SP was between 2.5 and 4 hours. The results show predominantly normally-distributed, case-specific sum scores of the evaluation criteria. The analysis of the individual assessment items refers to learning objectives that students find difficult to achieve (e.g. explicitly structuring the conversation). Problems in the technical implementation (<10 percent of the encounters) were due mainly to the use of insufficient hardware or internet connection problems. The need to define case-specific evaluation criteria triggered a discussion in the group of study directors about learning objectives and their operationalization. Summary: Web-based encounters can be built into the ongoing communication curriculum with reasonable effort. Training the SPs and heeding the technical requirements are of central importance. Practicing the virtual consultation was evaluated very positively by the students - in particular, the immediate feedback in the protected dialogue was appreciated by all involved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Physician-Patient Relations , Remote Consultation , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Feedback , Germany , Humans , Internet , Pilot Projects , Remote Consultation/standards , Switzerland
4.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 301, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, renal healthcare practitioners provide intensive and protracted support to a highly complex multi-morbid patient population however knowledge about the impact of COVID-19 on these practitioners is extremely limited. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the experiences of COVID-19 with renal healthcare practitioners during the first global lockdown between June 2020 and September 2020. METHODS: A multi-methods approach was carried out including a quantitative survey and qualitative interviews. This was a multinational study of renal healthcare practitioners from 29 countries. Quantitative: A self-designed survey on COVID-19 experiences and standardised questionnaires (General Health Questionnaire-12; Maslach Burnout Inventory). Descriptive statistics were generated for numerical data. Qualitative: Online semi-structured interviews were conducted. Data was subjected to thematic analysis. Renal healthcare practitioners (n = 251) completed an online survey. Thirteen renal healthcare practitioners took part in semi-structured interviews (12 nurses and 1 dietician). RESULTS: The majority of participants surveyed were female (86.9 %; n = 218), nurses (86.9 %; n = 218) with an average 21.5 (SD = 11.1) years' experience since professional qualification, and 16.3 years (SD = 9.3) working in renal healthcare. Survey responses indicated a level of preparedness, training and satisfactory personal protective equipment during the pandemic however approximately 40.3 % experienced fear about attending work, and 49.8 % experienced mental health distress. The highest prevalence of burnout was emotional exhaustion (35.9 %). Three themes emerged from the qualitative analysis highlighting the holistic complexities in managing renal healthcare, a neglected specialist workforce, and the need for appropriate support at work during a pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Results have highlighted the psychological impact, in terms of emotional exhaustion and mental health distress in our sample of renal healthcare practitioners. As the pandemic has continued, it is important to consider the long-term impact on an already stretched workforce including the risk of developing mental health disorders. Future research and interventions are required to understand and improve the provision of psychological support for specialist medical and nursing personnel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Nephrology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrology Nursing/economics , Nephrology Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Personal Protective Equipment , Psychological Distress , Qualitative Research , Workforce
5.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): 209-214, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted nursing education and required modification of instructional methods and clinical experiences. Given the variation in education, rapid transition to virtual platforms, and NCLEX-RN testing stressors, this cohort faced unique losses and gains influencing their transition into clinical practice. PURPOSE: This study examined the impact of COVID-19 and preparedness for professional practice of 340 new graduate nurses (NGNs) at an academic medical center. METHODS: This was a mixed-methods descriptive study focusing on how clinical experience loss or gains in the final semester affected the fears, concerns, and recommendations for NGNs. RESULTS: More than half (67.5%, n = 295) of NGNs reported changes to clinical experiences, ranging from 0 to 240 hours transitioned to virtual (n = 187; median, 51; interquartile range, 24-80). NGNs fear missing important details or doing something wrong in providing patient care. They identified the need for preceptor support, guidance, teaching, and continued practice of skills. CONCLUSION: Recommendations are clear communication with leadership, advocacy from the nurse residency program, and targeted clinical and emotional support for NGNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research
6.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(4): 270-272, 2021 08.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325945

ABSTRACT

In patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, endotracheal intubation is a procedure with a high risk for transmission. A videolaryngoscopy is a supplementary level of health care provider protection, but commercial videolaryngoscopes are expensive and not always available in pediatric intensive care units in Argentina. Our objective was to describe intubation practice using an infant head mannequin with a low-cost, handcrafted videolaryngoscope. Fifteen pediatricians with no prior experience using the device participated in an intubation practice in a head mannequin with a handcrafted videolaryngoscope. The average time for the first attempt was 116.4 seconds (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 84.8- 148.0) and, for the second one, 44.2 seconds (95 % CI: 27.7-60.6). Time decreased significantly for the second attempt (p: 0.0001). A successful intubation was achieved with the device in all attempts, and the procedure duration decreased with the second practice.


En pacientes con infección por SARS-CoV-2 la intubación endotraqueal es un procedimiento con riesgo elevado de contagio. La videolaringoscopia complementa la protección del profesional, pero los videolaringoscopios comerciales son caros y no siempre están disponibles en las terapias intensivas pediátricas argentinas. El objetivo fue describir la práctica de intubación en un modelo de cabeza de simulación de lactante con un videolaringoscopio artesanal de bajo costo. Quince pediatras sin experiencia previa con el dispositivo participaron de una práctica de intubación en una cabeza de simulación con un videolaringoscopio artesanal. El tiempo promedio del primer intento fue de 116,4 segundos (intervalo de confianza del 95 % [IC95 %]: 84,8-148,0) y, el del siguiente fue de 44,2 segundos (IC95 %: 27,7­60,6). El tiempo disminuyó de forma significativa en el segundo intento (p : 0,0001). El dispositivo permitió la intubación exitosa en todos los intentos acortando la duración del procedimiento en la segunda práctica.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intubation, Intratracheal/instrumentation , Laryngoscopes/economics , Laryngoscopy/education , Pediatrics/education , Simulation Training/methods , Argentina , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Health Care Costs , Humans , Infant , Internship and Residency/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal/economics , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopy/economics , Laryngoscopy/instrumentation , Laryngoscopy/methods , Learning Curve , Manikins , Pediatrics/economics , Time Factors , Video Recording
7.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253884, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304459

ABSTRACT

During clinical reasoning case conferences, a learner-centered approach using teleconferencing can create a psychologically safe environment and help learners speak up. This study aims to measure the psychological safety of students who are supposed to self-explain their clinical reasoning to conference participants. This crossover study compared the effects of two clinical reasoning case conference methods on medical students' psychological safety. The study population comprised 4th-5th year medical students participating in a two-week general medicine clinical clerkship rotation, from September 2019 to February 2020. They participated in both a learner-centered approach teleconference and a traditional, live-style conference. Teleconferences were conducted in a separate room, with only a group of students and one facilitator. Participants in group 1 received a learner-centered teleconference in the first week and a traditional, live-style conference in the second week. Participants assigned to group 2 received a traditional, live-style conference in the first week and a learner-centered approach teleconference in the second week. After each conference, Edmondson's Psychological Safety Scale was used to assess the students' psychological safety. We also counted the number of students who self-explained their clinical reasoning processes during each conference. Of the 38 students, 34 completed the study. Six out of the seven psychological safety items were significantly higher in the learner-centered approach teleconferences (p<0.01). Twenty-nine (85.3%) students performed self-explanation in the teleconference compared to ten (29.4%) in the live conference (p<0.01). A learner-centered approach teleconference could improve psychological safety in novice learners and increase the frequency of their self-explanation, helping educators better assess their understanding. Based on these results, a learner-centered teleconference approach has the potential to be a method for teaching clinical reasoning to medical students.


Subject(s)
Clinical Reasoning , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Students, Medical/psychology , Telecommunications , Adult , Clinical Clerkship/methods , Clinical Clerkship/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Over Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Japan , Male , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Problem-Based Learning/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
8.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253860, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295520

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate the impact of student e-learning on the development of clinical competencies. The study participants were 3rd year students (n = 43) at a private mid-sized medical school located in a South Korean suburb on a four-year medical program. Educational intervention was implemented to enhance student clinical performance. Students engaged in learning activities that intended to promote their self-directed learning abilities and clinical performances using e-learning resources. Intervention was conducted for the duration of six months during the 3rd year and its effectiveness was investigated by comparing student performances in OSCEs in a pre- and post- comparison format and also by comparing them with national scores. In addition, student perceptions of the impact of e-learning on their OSCE performances were assessed using a questionnaire, which included 36 items that elicited student perceptions of their experiences of e-learning and readiness for e-learning. Student OSCE scores improved significantly after educational intervention in all domains of clinical competencies assessed and for total scores (p < 0.001). Furthermore, students achieved higher OSCE scores than national average scores in the post-test, whereas they had performed lower than national average scores in the pre-test. Students showed neutral or slightly positive responses to the effectiveness of e-learning, and their perceptions of e-learning were not associated with their e-learning readiness scores. The study shows student OSCE performance improved significantly after educational intervention, which indicate the effectiveness of e-learning to support student learning of clinical performance. Despite significant improvements in student OSCE scores after e-learning, their perceptions of its effectiveness were neutral. Furthermore, student perceptions of e-learning were not associated with their readiness for it. Suggestions are made to help students use e-learning more effectively to enhance their clinical competencies.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Republic of Korea , Schools, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
9.
Clin Radiol ; 76(11): 854-860, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275247

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess trainee perceptions of the Radiology-Integrated Training Initiative (R-ITI)) e-learning modules. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A mixed methodology approach was used, with triangulation between a thematic analysis of eight semi-structured interviews from radiology trainees and trainers, and a contextual analysis of 60 free-text feedback comments and module ratings from trainees after completion of R-ITI modules. RESULTS: Three broad themes emerged: "learning the subject matter", "learning the role," and "e-learning preferences". Superficial learning techniques were prevalent when "learning the subject matter" during early training, with e-learning resources providing a good pedagogical fit for this learning. Much of what was considered "learning the role" of the radiologist was learned at the workplace. This included topics with inherent subjectivity, which were difficult to convey with e-learning. Trainees' "e-learning preferences" favoured modules that incorporated many imaging cases with layer annotation, clinical relevance, and self-assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The ease of reproducing imaging studies using the R-ITI platform represents a huge potential for e-learning. Content tailored to the learning needs of the trainee, the appropriateness of the subject matter for an online platform, and the design of the e-learning modules are important considerations. Radiology training also involves important tacit learning and discussions around subjective topics, which are difficult to capture on this platform.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Radiology/education , Students, Medical/psychology , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom
11.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 13(1): e1-e8, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262642

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The novel coronavirus 2019 or COVID-19 pandemic has brought about a global public health crisis. Primary care (PC) nurses render first line care, or refer for more specialised services. AIM: To investigate the preparedness of PC nurses for COVID-19 in the Western Cape. SETTING: The Western Cape province of South Africa. METHODS: We administered an online survey, with closed and open-ended questions, to 83 Stellenbosch University postgraduate PC nursing students and alumni working in the Western Cape, between 03 July and 01 September 2020. RESULTS: The results indicated that 43.3% of participants were confident about the infection, prevention, and control (IPC) training they received and 56.7% felt prepared to provide direct care to suspected cases of COVID-19. Primary care nurses were more comfortable to triage (78.3%) than to manage persons with COVID-19 (42.2%), indicating that they may not be functioning to the full capacity of their education and training. Adequate infrastructure was reported by less than a third of the participants (30.1%) and 59.1% reported that personal protective equipment (PPE) was always available. Primary care nurses needed support in coping with stress (57.8%) although few (14.5%) reported access to mental health services. CONCLUSION: Primary care nurses were not prepared optimally for the COVID-19 pandemic. Challenges included adequate training, infrastructure, the availability of personal protective equipment, COVID-19 testing of health care workers and management support. Primary care nurses need comprehensive support to manage stress and anxiety.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/nursing , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Primary Care Nursing/methods , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Education, Nursing , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Nurse Educ ; 46(4): 209-214, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted nursing education and required modification of instructional methods and clinical experiences. Given the variation in education, rapid transition to virtual platforms, and NCLEX-RN testing stressors, this cohort faced unique losses and gains influencing their transition into clinical practice. PURPOSE: This study examined the impact of COVID-19 and preparedness for professional practice of 340 new graduate nurses (NGNs) at an academic medical center. METHODS: This was a mixed-methods descriptive study focusing on how clinical experience loss or gains in the final semester affected the fears, concerns, and recommendations for NGNs. RESULTS: More than half (67.5%, n = 295) of NGNs reported changes to clinical experiences, ranging from 0 to 240 hours transitioned to virtual (n = 187; median, 51; interquartile range, 24-80). NGNs fear missing important details or doing something wrong in providing patient care. They identified the need for preceptor support, guidance, teaching, and continued practice of skills. CONCLUSION: Recommendations are clear communication with leadership, advocacy from the nurse residency program, and targeted clinical and emotional support for NGNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research
13.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(6): 486-491, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation training has become a key part of the surgical curriculum over recent years. Current trainees face significantly reduced operating time as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, alongside increased costs to surgical training, thus creating a need for low-cost simulation models. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using multiple databases. Each model included was assessed for the ease and expense of its construction, as well as its validity and educational value. RESULTS: A total of 18 low-cost simulation models were identified, relating to otology, head and neck surgery, laryngeal surgery, rhinology, and tonsil surgery. In only four of these models (22.2 per cent) was an attempt made to demonstrate the educational impact of the model. Validation was rarely formally assessed. CONCLUSION: More efforts are required to standardise validation methods and demonstrate the educational value of the available low-cost simulation models in otorhinolaryngology.


Subject(s)
Computer Simulation/economics , Otolaryngology/education , Simulation Training/economics , Surgeons/education , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Competence/economics , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Computer Simulation/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Databases, Factual , Humans , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Simulation Training/methods , United Kingdom/epidemiology
14.
Cell Rep Med ; 2(4): 100258, 2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190972

ABSTRACT

As scientists and physicians, we all went through a period of structured training. But for how many of us did a rapid-onset, global pandemic upend that training? Here we present 11 voices from current trainees, including medical students, graduate students, residents, and fellows, who reflect on how the pandemic altered their research, practice, and learning and, in the process, changed them.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Education, Medical, Graduate , Pandemics , Physicians , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data
15.
Clin Radiol ; 76(7): 549.e9-549.e15, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163597

ABSTRACT

AIM: To obtain a national snapshot of radiology trainees' experience during the first wave of the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 25-item questionnaire was disseminated to representatives from all training regions across the UK in July 2020. Each representative collated the collective experiences of trainees in their training programme in key domains, including redeployment, shielding, training, and teaching. RESULTS: Ninety-five percent (38 of 40) of representatives completed the questionnaire. Trainees in up to 76% of training programmes were redeployed to wards and some trainees were shielding in 81% of programmes. Only 27% of programmes enabled remote reporting for isolating or shielding trainees. Sixty-two percent of respondents felt their well-being needs were supported. There was an overall increase in the attendance, volume, and quality of teaching and training nationally due to improved accessibility via remote-learning methods. Significant challenges were described with reporting, interventional procedures, and multidisciplinary team meeting attendance, although 62% of programmes noted an increase in service provision. Less in-person feedback was reported with in-person training still deemed necessary for practical skills. The Royal College of Radiologists Junior Radiologists Forum webinars were well received by all trainees with continuation of the series recommended. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a clear impact on many areas of radiology training in the UK. Early strategies have been adopted to mitigate the challenges faced by trainees and opportunities for future improvement are highlighted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Radiologists/statistics & numerical data , Radiology/education , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
16.
Australas Emerg Care ; 24(3): 186-196, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157136

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emergency clinicians have a crucial role during public health emergencies and have been at the frontline during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined the knowledge, preparedness and experiences of Australian emergency nurses, emergency physicians and paramedics in managing COVID-19. METHODS: A voluntary cross-sectional study of members of the College of Emergency Nursing Australasia, the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, and the Australasian College of Paramedicine was conducted using an online survey (June-September 2020). RESULTS: Of the 159 emergency nurses, 110 emergency physicians and 161 paramedics, 67.3-78% from each group indicated that their current knowledge of COVID-19 was 'good to very good'. The most frequently accessed source of COVID-19 information was from state department of health websites. Most of the respondents in each group (77.6-86.4%) received COVID-19 specific training and education, including personal protective equipment (PPE) usage. One-third of paramedics reported that their workload 'had lessened' while 36.4-40% of emergency nurses and physicians stated that their workload had 'considerably increased'. Common concerns raised included disease transmission to family, public complacency, and PPE availability. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive training and education and adequate support helped prepare emergency clinicians to manage COVID-19 patients. Challenges included inconsistent and rapidly changing communications and availability of PPE.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Infection Control/organization & administration , Adult , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Medical Services/standards , Emergency Treatment/standards , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data
17.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(5): 391-395, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139694

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a response to the acute strain placed on the National Health Service during the first wave of coronavirus disease 2019 in the UK, a number of junior doctors including ENT trainees were redeployed to other clinical specialties. This presented these trainees with novel challenges and opportunities. METHODS: A qualitative study was performed to explore these experiences, undertaking semi-structured interviews with ENT trainees between 17th and 30th July. Participants were recruited through purposeful sampling. Interview transcripts underwent thematic analysis using Dedoose software. RESULTS: Seven ENT trainees were interviewed, ranging from specialty trainee years four to eight ('ST4' to 'ST8') in grade. Six core themes were identified: organisation of redeployment, utilisation of skill set, emotional impact of redeployment, redeployed team dynamics, concerns about safety and impact on training. CONCLUSION: The ENT trainees' experiences of redeployment described highlight some important lessons and considerations for future redeployments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Otolaryngologists/supply & distribution , State Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Decision Making/physiology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Otolaryngologists/education , Otolaryngologists/psychology , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , State Medicine/organization & administration , Training Support/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
19.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 39, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088581

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Family medicine physicians may encounter a wide variety of conditions, including acute and urgent cases. Considering the limited access to diagnostic investigations in primary care practice, chest X-ray remains the imaging modality of choice. The current study assessed the competency of family medicine residents in the interpretation of chest X-rays for emergency conditions and to compare it with that of diagnostic radiology residents, general practitioners, and medical interns. METHODS: An online survey was distributed to 600 physicians, including family medicine residents, medical interns, general practitioners, and diagnostic radiology residents. The study included some background information such as gender, years in practice, training type, interest in pulmonary medicine and diagnostic radiology, and having adequate training on the interpretation of chest X-rays. The survey had 10 chest X-ray cases with brief clinical information. Participants were asked to choose the most likely diagnosis and to rate their degree of confidence in the interpretation of the chest X-ray for each case. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 205 physicians (response rate = 34.2%). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 63.1% with a significant difference between family medicine and radiology residents (58.0% vs. 90.5%; P < 0.001). The COVID-19 pneumonia (85.4%) and pneumoperitoneum (80.5%) cases had the highest diagnostic accuracy scores. There was a significant correlation between the diagnostic confidence and accuracy (rs = 0.39; P < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis revealed that being diagnostic radiology residents (odds ratio [OR]: 13.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.5-67.7) and having higher diagnostic confidence (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.8) were the only independent predictors of achieving high diagnostic accuracy. CONCLUSION: The competency of family medicine residents in the interpretation of chest X-ray for emergency conditions was far from optimal. The introduction of radiology training courses on emergency conditions seems imperative. Alternatively, the use of tele-radiology in primary healthcare centers should be considered.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Competence/standards , Internship and Residency/standards , Physicians, Family/education , Radiography, Thoracic/standards , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Physicians, Family/standards , Pneumoperitoneum/diagnostic imaging , Surveys and Questionnaires
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