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1.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(7): 821-824, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339693

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) changed the dynamics of health care delivery, shifting patient priorities and deferring care perceived as less urgent. Delayed or eliminated care may place patients at risk for adverse outcomes. OBJECTIVE.­: To identify opportunities for laboratory test stewardship to close potential gaps in care created by the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN.­: The study was a retrospective time series design examining laboratory services received before and during the COVID-19 pandemic at a large metropolitan health system serving women and children. RESULTS.­: Laboratory test volumes displayed 3 distinct patterns: (1) a decrease during state lockdown, followed by near-complete or complete recovery; (2) no change; and (3) a persistent decrease. Tests that diagnose or monitor chronic illness recovered only partially. For example, hemoglobin A1c initially declined 80% (from 2232 for April 2019 to 452 for April 2020), and there was a sustained 16% drop (28-day daily average 117 at August 30, 2019, to 98 at August 30, 2020) 4 months later. Blood lead dropped 39% (from 2158 for April 2019 to 1314 for April 2020) and remained 23% lower after 4 months. CONCLUSIONS.­: The pandemic has taken a toll on patients, practitioners, and health systems. Laboratory professionals have access to data that can provide insight into clinical practice and identify pandemic-related gaps in care. During the pandemic, the biggest patient threat is underuse, particularly among tests to manage chronic diseases and for traditionally underserved communities and people of color. A laboratory stewardship program, focused on peri-pandemic care, positions pathologists and other laboratory professionals as health care leaders with a commitment to appropriate, equitable, and efficient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Laboratory Services/trends , Diagnostic Tests, Routine/trends , Health Care Rationing/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Health Policy , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Texas
2.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 17(2): 551-555, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268377

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 19) is a zoonotic viral infection that originated in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. It was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization shortly thereafter. This pandemic is going to have a lasting impact on the functioning of pathology laboratories due to the frequent handling of potentially infectious samples by the laboratory personnel. To deal with this unprecedented situation, various national and international guidelines have been put forward outlining the precautions to be taken during sample processing from a potentially infectious patient. PURPOSE: Most of these guidelines are centered around laboratories that are a part of designated COVID 19 hospitals. However, proper protocols need to be in place in all laboratories, irrespective of whether they are a part of COVID 19 hospital or not as this would greatly reduce the risk of exposure of laboratory/hospital personnel. As part of a laboratory associated with a rural cancer hospital which is not a dedicated COVID 19 hospital, we aim to present our institute's experience in handling pathology specimens during the COVID 19 era. CONCLUSION: We hope this will address the concerns of small to medium sized laboratories and help them build an effective strategy required for protecting the laboratory personnel from risk of exposure and also ensure smooth and optimum functioning of the laboratory services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Cancer Care Facilities/standards , Clinical Laboratory Services/standards , Decontamination/methods , Decontamination/standards , Developing Countries , Disinfection/methods , Disinfection/organization & administration , Disinfection/standards , Hospitals, Rural/organization & administration , Hospitals, Rural/standards , Humans , India/epidemiology , Infection Control/standards , Medical Laboratory Personnel/organization & administration , Medical Laboratory Personnel/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Specimen Handling/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/standards
3.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 35(6): e23804, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Before public health emergencies became a major challenge worldwide, the scope of laboratory management was only related to developing, maintaining, improving, and sustaining the quality of accurate laboratory results for improved clinical outcomes. Indeed, quality management is an especially important aspect and has achieved great milestones during the development of clinical laboratories. CURRENT STATUS: However, since the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to be a threat worldwide, previous management mode inside the separate laboratory could not cater to the demand of the COVID-19 public health emergency. Among emerging new issues, the prominent challenges during the period of COVID-19 pandemic are rapid-launched laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) for urgent clinical application, rapid expansion of testing capabilities, laboratory medicine resources, and personnel shortages. These related issues are now impacting on clinical laboratory and need to be effectively addressed. CONCLUSION: Different from traditional views of laboratory medicine management that focus on separate laboratories, present clinical laboratory management must be multidimensional mode which should consider consolidation of the efficient network of regional clinical laboratories and reasonable planning of laboratories resources from the view of overall strategy. Based on relevant research and our experience, in this review, we retrospect the history trajectory of laboratory medicine management, and also, we provide existing and other feasible recommended management strategies for laboratory medicine in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Services , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Laboratories , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Services/standards , Humans , Laboratories/organization & administration , Laboratories/standards , Point-of-Care Testing , Public Health , Quality Assurance, Health Care
4.
Lab Med ; 52(6): 619-625, 2021 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1214642

ABSTRACT

Laboratory information systems need to adapt to new demands created by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has set up new normals like containment measures and social distancing. Some of these have negatively impacted the pre- and postanalytical phases of laboratory testing. Here, we present an intriguing finding related to the generation of the accession number/specimen number on the investigation module of a hospital management information system and its impact on the dissemination of reports resulting in the wrong release of reports on a female patient amidst the background of COVID-19 containment measures. We analyze the situation that led to this false reporting and the importance of the proper customization of information software in laboratories along with a robust postanalytical framework of laboratory work culture to avert such untoward incidents. This introspection has made us realize that COVID-19 has been a scientific, medical, and social challenge. We need to redefine our priorities in the days to come because SARS-CoV-2 is here to stay.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diagnostic Errors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Specimen Handling/standards , Staining and Labeling/standards , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Laboratory Information Systems/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Disease Notification/methods , Female , Humans , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , Young Adult
6.
Am J Clin Pathol ; 155(1): 4-11, 2021 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066247

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The clinical laboratory community has faced unprecedented challenges in responding to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Long-held assumptions about laboratory management have been reconsidered in light of these new circumstances. METHODS: Experience during the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic at a clinical reference laboratory was reviewed in the context of several commonly held management principles to assess their relevance to clinical laboratory operations during a crisis. RESULTS: Management and operational ideas regarding different modes of communication, physical proximity and interaction, operating under a fixed budget, and maintaining a breadth of laboratory service offerings have been challenged during the COVID-19 pandemic. The importance of putting people first, maintaining collaboration, and providing effective leadership and communication throughout an organization have been highlighted. CONCLUSIONS: The collaborative activities of highly interdependent teams and individuals have helped the clinical laboratory community respond to society's needs in the COVID-19 crisis. Not all laboratory management principles apply equally well in the course of an international respiratory pandemic. When navigating crises, leaders need to distinguish situational management principles from those that are universal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Infection Control , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Interprofessional Relations , Intersectoral Collaboration , Utah
7.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 100(1): 115309, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1032803

ABSTRACT

Diagnostic microbiology services form a critical component of the response to infectious disease outbreaks. Like previous respiratory virus pandemics, the COVID-19 pandemic has placed significant strains on the standing capacity of laboratories around the world. In this case study, we describe the surge response required by our laboratory to meet the fluctuating demand for SARS-CoV-2 in our regional pathology service in Western Sydney, Australia between March and May 2020. While the overall number of SARS-CoV-2 PCR positive cases was relatively low compared to other Australian local health districts, testing numbers were highly unpredictable and changed on a weekly basis as local outbreaks were detected. As with other laboratories, numerous other challenges were also faced during this period, including the requirement to introduce a new and unaccredited diagnostic PCR assay for SARS-CoV-2, local and global shortages of reagents for sampling and sample processing, and a significant institutional SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in our laboratory catchment area. A successful service delivery during this period could only be maintained by a dynamic whole-of-laboratory and organizational response including (1) operational changes to the hours of service and the expansion of diagnostic testing at our laboratory site and other sites within our organization (2) careful management of specialist staff and re-training and recruitment of additional staff (3) changes to laboratory workflows to improve SARS-CoV-2 PCR test turnaround time and to accommodate limits to precious laboratory reagents; (4) clear communication within our laboratory and the NSW Health Pathology organization; and (5) collaborative co-ordination and support by NSW Health Pathology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Laboratories/organization & administration , Microbiology , Australia , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Services/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Laboratories/supply & distribution , Medical Laboratory Personnel/education , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Time Factors
9.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 78(6): 609-616, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999891

ABSTRACT

Confronted with the COVID-19 crisis, healthcare professionals have had to tackle an epidemic crisis of a huge magnitude for which they were not prepared. Medical laboratories have been on the front line, from collecting samples to performing the analysis required to diagnose this new pathology. Responding to the needs and to the urgency of the situation, the authorities relied on the network of private laboratories. In France, private laboratory medicine represents 70% of overall activity, and with a network of more than 4,000 local laboratories, private laboratory medicine has been the cornerstone of the « screen-trace-isolate ¼ strategy. This article gives feedback from private laboratory medicine professionals, directly involved in the reorganization carried out at the pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical stages, during the crisis from March to October 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Private Sector/organization & administration , Specimen Handling/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Services/standards , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/instrumentation , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Equipment Safety/methods , Equipment Safety/standards , France/epidemiology , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Medical Staff/organization & administration , Medical Staff/standards , Patient Safety/standards , Pre-Analytical Phase/methods , Pre-Analytical Phase/standards , Private Sector/standards , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Specimen Handling/methods
11.
J Appl Lab Med ; 6(2): 451-462, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949471

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patient surges beyond hospital capacity during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic emphasized a need for clinical laboratories to prepare test processes to support future patient care. The objective of this study was to determine if current instrumentation in local hospital laboratories can accommodate the anticipated workload from COVID-19 infected patients in hospitals and a proposed field hospital in addition to testing for non-infected patients. METHODS: Simulation models predicted instrument throughput and turn-around-time for chemistry, ion-selective-electrode, and immunoassay tests using vendor-developed software with different workload scenarios. The expanded workload included tests from anticipated COVID patients in 2 local hospitals and a proposed field hospital with a COVID-specific test menu in addition to the pre-pandemic workload. RESULTS: Instrumentation throughput and turn-around time at each site was predicted. With additional COVID-patient beds in each hospital, the maximum throughput was approached with no impact on turnaround time. Addition of the field hospital workload led to significantly increased test turnaround times at each site. CONCLUSIONS: Simulation models depicted the analytic capacity and turn-around times for laboratory tests at each site and identified the laboratory best suited for field hospital laboratory support during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/instrumentation , COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Care Rationing/methods , Laboratories, Hospital/organization & administration , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Testing/trends , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Services/statistics & numerical data , Computer Simulation , Datasets as Topic , Forecasting/methods , Health Care Rationing/statistics & numerical data , Health Planning Technical Assistance , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/trends , Laboratories, Hospital/supply & distribution , Laboratories, Hospital/trends , Models, Statistical , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic/supply & distribution , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Saskatchewan/epidemiology , Software , Time Factors , Workload/statistics & numerical data
13.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 78(5): 499-518, 2020 10 01.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-836031

ABSTRACT

The French society of clinical biology "Biochemical markers of COVID-19" has set up a working group with the primary aim of reviewing, analyzing and monitoring the evolution of biological prescriptions according to the patient's care path and to look for markers of progression and severity of the disease. This study covers all public and private sectors of medical biology located in metropolitan and overseas France and also extends to the French-speaking world. This article presents the testimonies and data obtained for the "Overseas and French-speaking countries" sub-working group made up of 45 volunteer correspondents, located in 20 regions of the world. In view of the delayed spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the overseas regions and the French-speaking regions have benefited from feedback from the first territories confronted with COVID-19. Thus, the entry of the virus or its spread in epidemic form could be avoided, thanks to the rapid closure of borders. The overseas territories depend very strongly on air and/or sea links with the metropolis or with the neighboring continent. The isolation of these countries is responsible for reagent supply difficulties and has necessitated emergency orders and the establishment of stocks lasting several months, in order to avoid shortages and maintain adequate patient care. In addition, in countries located in tropical or intertropical zones, the diagnosis of COVID-19 is complicated by the presence of various zoonoses (dengue, Zika, malaria, leptospirosis, etc.).


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Services , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Travel Medicine/organization & administration , Adult , Africa/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Belgium/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Biomarkers/analysis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Cambodia/epidemiology , Child , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Services/statistics & numerical data , Contact Tracing/methods , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Islands/epidemiology , Language , Laos/epidemiology , Louisiana/epidemiology , Male , Medical Laboratory Personnel/organization & administration , Medical Laboratory Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Survival Analysis , Travel Medicine/methods , Travel Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Travel-Related Illness , Tropical Climate , Tropical Medicine/methods , Tropical Medicine/organization & administration , Tropical Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Vietnam/epidemiology
14.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 78(4): 446-448, 2020 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634852

ABSTRACT

Training and education are essential for medical students. During the COVID-19 outbreak, numerous schools and universities have had to close. Ensuring pedagogical continuity requires alternatives to the traditional classroom, especially in medical education. Usual distance learning tools such as videos and downloadable handouts are not sufficient to promote efficient teaching. Distance learning requires self-motivation and does not give you direct access to your instructor. Some students fear the loss of human contact with an instructor - like asking questions during and after class - which promotes learning, understanding and communication. Moreover, classical distance learning methods do not offer immediate feedback that can help students in their understanding of the lecture. In this context, interactive pedagogic tools (IPT) could be useful for medical education continuity and for maintaining human contact necessary in pedagogy. We briefly evaluated interactive pedagogic tool compared to traditionnal distancial tools on medical students. This study showed the importance to have direct contact with a teacher and feedback during a lecture and to not exclusively perform distance learning without direct interaction and feedback. Hence, in the present context, we encourage teacher to use this type of tools to maintain direct interaction with students - which is essential in pedagogy - and ensure a qualitative pedagogical continuity.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Simulation Training , Software , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Computer-Assisted Instruction/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Humans , Internet/organization & administration , Internet/standards , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Problem-Based Learning/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Simulation Training/methods , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Simulation Training/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Video Recording/methods , Video Recording/standards
16.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 98(2): 115123, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-625039

ABSTRACT

Here, we retrospectively analyzed the comparative results of 182 paired dry nasopharyngeal swabs tested by Abbott ID NOW and nasopharyngeal swabs in viral transport medium by real-time RT-PCR methods. While the overall agreement was 96.2%, we found that of 15 samples that were tested positive with RT-PCR methods, 7 were missed by ID NOW, resulting in a false-negative rate of 47%.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Nasopharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , DNA, Viral/analysis , Databases, Factual , False Negative Reactions , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Sampling Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Specimen Handling , United States
17.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 78(3): 269-277, 2020 06 01.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-608309

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is responsible for an epidemic disease called COVID-19, which was initially evidenced in Wuhan, China, and spread very rapidly in China and around the world. In France, the first isolated case seems now to be reported in December 2019, stage 3 of the COVID-19 epidemic was triggered on March 14th, the start of the planned containment exit from May 11th. Healthcare services have faced a large influx of patients who may be beyond their capacity to receive and care, particularly in the Large-East and Ile-de-France regions. Some patients show an evolution of the disease never observed before with other coronaviruses and develop in a few days a very important inflammatory reaction, which can lead to death of patients. A working group of the French Society of Clinical Biology (SFBC) was set up with the objective of providing updated information on the current status of the biological prescriptions (focusing on biochemistry ones) and their evolution during the epidemic, and of analyzing the biological parameters associated with comorbidities and patient evolution in order to link biological results with medical events. The expanded working group covers all sectors of medical biology in France and extends to the French-speaking world: hospital sectors (CHU and CH, Army Training Hospitals) and the private sector opening a field of view on the biological situation in establishments for dependent elderly, social establishments and clinical medical institutions. The purpose of this article is the presentation of this working group and its immediate and future actions.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Biochemistry/organization & administration , Biomarkers/analysis , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Societies, Scientific/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biochemistry/standards , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Clinical Laboratory Services/standards , Community Networks/organization & administration , Community Networks/standards , Community Networks/trends , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , France/epidemiology , History, 21st Century , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Professional Practice/organization & administration , Professional Practice/standards , Professional Practice/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Scientific/standards , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/standards
18.
Int J Lab Hematol ; 42 Suppl 1: 11-18, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-602630

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic originated in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, in December 2019. The etiologic agent is a novel coronavirus of presumed zoonotic origin with structural similarity to the viruses responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). Like SARS and MERS, COVID-19 infection manifests most frequently with lower respiratory symptoms. A minority of patients progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome/ diffuse alveolar damage. In addition to its central role in the diagnosis of COVID-19 infection, the clinical laboratory provides critical information to clinicians regarding prognosis, disease course, and response to therapy. The purpose of this review is to (a) provide background context about the origins and course of the pandemic, (b) discuss the laboratory's role in the diagnosis of COVID-19 infection, (c) summarize the current state of biomarker analysis in COVID-19 infection, with an emphasis on markers derived from the hematology laboratory, (d) comment on the impact of COVID-19 on hematology laboratory safety, and (e) describe the impact the pandemic has had on organized national and international educational activities worldwide.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Hematology/methods , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Laboratories/organization & administration , Lymphopenia/diagnosis , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Procalcitonin/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombocytopenia/diagnosis , Thrombocytopenia/physiopathology , United States/epidemiology , Viral Proteins/blood
19.
J Med Microbiol ; 69(7): 920-923, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-595403

ABSTRACT

The biological motor behind the current coronavirus pandemic has placed microbiology on a global stage, and given its practitioners a role among the architects of recovery. Planning for a return to normality or the new normal is a complex, multi-agency task for which healthcare scientists may not be prepared. This paper introduces a widely used military planning framework known as the Joint Military Appreciation Process, and outlines how it can be applied to deal with the next phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Recognition of SARS-CoV-2's critical attributes, targetable vulnerabilities, and its most likely and most dangerous effects is a necessary precursor to scoping, framing and mission analysis. From this flows course of action development, analysis, concept of operations development, and an eventual decision to act on the plan. The same planning technique is applicable to the larger scale task of setting a microbiology-centric plan in the broader context of social and economic recovery.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Military Science/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Services/supply & distribution , Disaster Planning/methods , Disaster Planning/trends , Health , Humans , Pandemics
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