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2.
Eur Respir Rev ; 31(164)2022 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892170

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading infectious cause of death worldwide and the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has negatively impacted the global TB burden of disease indicators. If the targets of TB mortality and incidence reduction set by the international community are to be met, new more effective adult and adolescent TB vaccines are urgently needed. There are several new vaccine candidates at different stages of clinical development. Given the limited funding for vaccine development, it is crucial that trial designs are as efficient as possible. Prevention of infection (POI) approaches offer an attractive opportunity to accelerate new candidate vaccines to advance into large and expensive prevention of disease (POD) efficacy trials. However, POI approaches are limited by imperfect current tools to measure Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection end-points. POD trials need to carefully consider the type and number of microbiological tests that define TB disease and, if efficacy against subclinical (asymptomatic) TB disease is to be tested, POD trials need to explore how best to define and measure this form of TB. Prevention of recurrence trials are an alternative approach to generate proof of concept for efficacy, but optimal timing of vaccination relative to treatment must still be explored. Novel and efficient approaches to efficacy trial design, in addition to an increasing number of candidates entering phase 2-3 trials, would accelerate the long-standing quest for a new TB vaccine.


Subject(s)
Clinical Trials as Topic , Tuberculosis Vaccines , Vaccine Development , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Humans , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , Research Design , Tuberculosis/prevention & control
5.
Int J Infect Dis ; 116: 210-215, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683186

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak is currently ravaging populations worldwide. Many studies were registered and conducted in rapid response to the epidemic, but how to choose the proper design for clinical trials remains the main concern. This study aimed to determine the fundamental characteristics of study design during the COVID-19 pandemic and provide references for other emerging infectious diseases. METHODS: We searched the database of ClinicalTrials.gov with the keyword "COVID-19" and compared the results with the design features of other conventional studies except for COVID-19. RESULTS: From January 1, 2020 to September 30, 2021, 55,334 trials were registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. Of all the registered trials, 6,408 were related to COVID-19 (11.58%). There were significant differences in the proportion of observational studies between COVID-19 (43.48%) and others (23.27%). The completion rate of observational trials and interventional trials in COVID-19 was 29.04% and 25.84%, respectively. COVID-19 trials showed a higher rate of completion than others (P<0.01). The time distribution and trend of observational studies and interventional studies varied considerably. CONCLUSION: Appropriately designed trials can help to improve research efficiency and reduce the possibility of research failure. In addition to randomized controlled trials, observational and single-armed studies are also worth considering.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Databases, Factual , Humans , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 146: 112517, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561313

ABSTRACT

Rapid changes in the viral genome allow viruses to evade threats posed by the host immune response or antiviral drugs, and can lead to viral persistence in the host cells. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is an essential enzyme in RNA viruses, which is involved in RNA synthesis through the formation of phosphodiester bonds. Therefore, in RNA viral infections such as SARS-CoV-2, RdRp could be a crucial therapeutic target. The present review discusses the promising application of RdRp inhibitors, previously approved or currently being tested in human clinical trials, in the treatment of RNA virus infections. Nucleoside inhibitors (NIs) bind to the active site of RdRp, while nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNIs) bind to allosteric sites. Given the absence of highly effective drugs for the treatment of COVID-19, the discovery of an efficient treatment for this pandemic is an urgent concern for researchers around the world. We review the evidence for molnupiravir (MK-4482, EIDD-2801), an antiviral drug originally designed for Alphavirus infections, as a potential preventive and therapeutic agent for the management of COVID-19. At the beginning of this pandemic, molnupiravir was in preclinical development for seasonal influenza. When COVID-19 spread dramatically, the timeline for development was accelerated to focus on the treatment of this pandemic. Real time consultation with regulators took place to expedite this program. We summarize the therapeutic potential of RdRp inhibitors, and highlight molnupiravir as a new small molecule drug for COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/enzymology , Cytidine/analogs & derivatives , Hydroxylamines/therapeutic use , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Cytidine/pharmacology , Cytidine/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxylamines/pharmacology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism
12.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3199-3202, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474921

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on neuroscientists, including those involved in translational research. In this NeuroView, we discuss the positive and negative effects of the pandemic on preclinical research and clinical studies in humans.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology , Biomedical Research/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Neurology/methods , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Neurodegenerative Diseases/epidemiology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/therapy , Neurology/trends
13.
Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol ; 395(1): 99-104, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473988

ABSTRACT

A massive vaccination campaign against the global COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus began worldwide in January 2021. However, studies continue to investigate the most effective and safe drug therapies to manage the various stages of viral infection. It is critical in the therapeutic management of the patient, with ongoing COVID-19 infection, to reduce viral load and replication, and to regulate the generalized hyperinflammatory state caused by the cytokine storm that occurs in the most severe phases. Probably the right drug therapy is represented by the use of different drugs acting in different modalities and on different targets, to avoid also viral drug resistance. In this article, we describe an interesting scientific pharmacological hypothesis arising from the evidence in the literature; we believe that the association of baricitinib/remdesivir/rhACE2, administered at the right time and dose, represents an important pharmacological synergism that can be therapeutically more effective for the treatment of COVID-19 infection than the single administration of drugs and avoid the phenomenon of drug resistance caused by the virus.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Azetidines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disease Management , Purines/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Alanine/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Synergism , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans
15.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 42(spe): e20200389, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443892

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate the content of workflows for trial participants care in a clinical research center during the Covid-19 pandemic. METHOD: development study by consensus of experts carried out from March to July 2020 in southern Brazil. The flowcharts were developed following literature and validated by specialists considering comprehensiveness, clarity and pertinence, obtaining a 100% agreement index on each item of the developed instruments. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the institution. RESULTS: two flowcharts of care were elaborated and validated: "Flow diagram to conduct protocols with research participant " and "Flow diagram in protocols with research participant with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection"; which describes activities to ensure continuity of care. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: a routine workflow can promote the continuity and safety of clinical research protocols. It is expected that the adopted flowcharts in this study can guide other institutions with a similar research profile.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Workflow , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Research Personnel , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Stroke ; 52(11): 3739-3747, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443690

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has presented unique challenges to stroke care and research internationally. In particular, clinical trials in stroke are vulnerable to the impacts of the pandemic at multiple stages, including design, recruitment, intervention, follow-up, and interpretation of outcomes. A carefully considered approach is required to ensure the appropriate conduct of stroke trials during the pandemic and to maintain patient and participant safety. This has been recently addressed by the International Council for Harmonisation which, in November 2019, released an addendum to the Statistical Principles for Clinical Trials guidelines entitled Estimands and Sensitivity Analysis in Clinical Trials. In this article, we present the International Council for Harmonisation estimand framework for the design and conduct of clinical trials, with a specific focus on its application to stroke clinical trials. This framework aims to align the clinical and scientific objectives of a trial with its design and end points. It also encourages the prospective consideration of potential postrandomization intercurrent events which may occur during a trial and either impact the ability to measure an end point or its interpretation. We describe the different categories of such events and the proposed strategies for dealing with them, specifically focusing on the COVID-19 pandemic as a source of intercurrent events. We also describe potential practical impacts posed by the COVID-19 pandemic on trials, health systems, study groups, and participants, all of which should be carefully reviewed by investigators to ensure an adequate practical and statistical strategy is in place to protect trial integrity. We provide examples of the implementation of the estimand framework within hypothetical stroke trials in intracerebral hemorrhage and stroke recovery. While the focus of this article is on COVID-19 impacts, the strategies and principles proposed are well suited for other potential events or issues, which may impact clinical trials in the field of stroke.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Research Design , Stroke/therapy , Clinical Trials as Topic/standards , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Implementation Science , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 80(10): 1286-1298, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406632

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite growing interest, there is no guidance or consensus on how to conduct clinical trials and observational studies in populations at risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: An European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) task force formulated four research questions to be addressed by systematic literature review (SLR). The SLR results informed consensus statements. One overarching principle, 10 points to consider (PTC) and a research agenda were proposed. Task force members rated their level of agreement (1-10) for each PTC. RESULTS: Epidemiological and demographic characteristics should be measured in all clinical trials and studies in at-risk individuals. Different at-risk populations, identified according to clinical presentation, were defined: asymptomatic, musculoskeletal symptoms without arthritis and early clinical arthritis. Study end-points should include the development of subclinical inflammation on imaging, clinical arthritis, RA and subsequent achievement of arthritis remission. Risk factors should be assessed at baseline and re-evaluated where appropriate; they include genetic markers and autoantibody profiling and additionally clinical symptoms and subclinical inflammation on imaging in those with symptoms and/or clinical arthritis. Trials should address the effect of the intervention on risk factors, as well as progression to clinical arthritis or RA. In patients with early clinical arthritis, pharmacological intervention has the potential to prevent RA development. Participants' knowledge of their RA risk may inform their decision to participate; information should be provided using an individually tailored approach. CONCLUSION: These consensus statements provide data-driven guidance for rheumatologists, health professionals and investigators conducting clinical trials and observational studies in individuals at risk of RA.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/prevention & control , Asymptomatic Diseases , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Observational Studies as Topic/methods , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/diagnostic imaging , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , Europe , Humans , Rheumatology , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Societies, Medical
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