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1.
Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging ; 7(4): 343-345, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797116
2.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(2): 360-375, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788335

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Our proof-of-concept study tested the feasibility of virtual testing using child assessments that were originally validated for in-person testing only. METHOD: Ten adult-child dyads were assigned to complete both in-person and virtual tests of language, cognition, and narratives. Child participants fell between the ages of 4 and 8 years; adult participants were speech-language clinicians or researchers with experience in administering child assessments. Half of child participants were Spanish-English bilinguals, and half were monolingual English speakers. RESULTS: Results showed similar performance across in-person and virtual modalities on all assessments. Recommendations for adapting, administering, and scoring virtual measures with linguistically diverse children are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: Although additional research on virtual assessment is needed, our results open opportunities for appropriate remote assessment, particularly for bilingual children, who may not have in-person access to speech-language pathology services.


Subject(s)
Multilingualism , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Cognition , Humans , Language
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e055038, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784816

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A substantial number of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 experience long-term persistent symptoms. First evidence suggests that long-term symptoms develop largely independently of disease severity and include, among others, cognitive impairment. For these symptoms, there are currently no validated therapeutic approaches available. Cognitive training interventions are a promising approach to counteract cognitive impairment. Combining training with concurrent transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may further increase and sustain behavioural training effects. Here, we aim to examine the effects of cognitive training alone or in combination with tDCS on cognitive performance, quality of life and mental health in patients with post-COVID-19 subjective or objective cognitive impairments. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study protocol describes a prospective randomised open endpoint-blinded trial. Patients with post-COVID-19 cognitive impairment will either participate in a 3-week cognitive training or in a defined muscle relaxation training (open-label interventions). Irrespective of their primary intervention, half of the cognitive training group will additionally receive anodal tDCS, all other patients will receive sham tDCS (double-blinded, secondary intervention). The primary outcome will be improvement of working memory performance, operationalised by an n-back task, at the postintervention assessment. Secondary outcomes will include performance on trained and untrained tasks and measures of health-related quality of life at postassessment and follow-up assessments (1 month after the end of the trainings). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was granted by the Ethics Committee of the University Medicine Greifswald (number: BB 066/21). Results will be available through publications in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at national and international conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04944147.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation , Brain , COVID-19/therapy , Cognition , Cognitive Dysfunction/therapy , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
4.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 122(3): 126-130, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1786403

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to identify postcovid asthenic syndrome and cognitive disorders in young patients on an outpatient basis, and to evaluate the experience of using combined neurotropic therapy in this category of patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Included 87 young patients who underwent COVID-19 and applied for an outpatient appointment with a neurologist. All patients underwent a scale assessment of the severity of asthenia on the MFI-20 scale, cognitive functions - on the MMSE scale, the 5-word test and the Schulte test. The severity of the anxiety syndrome - according to the Spielberger Anxiety Scale. All patients in the study group were treated with a combination of Cortexin and Recognan, and a repeat study was conducted 4 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: The study revealed the predominance in the observation group of patients with a comorbid background, as well as pronounced anxiety disorders. After the complex treatment, there was a significant decrease in the indicators of common, physical, mental asthenia, as well as an increase in motivational activity, there was a decrease in situational anxiety, and to a lesser extent personal anxiety. According to cognitive tests, there was an improvement in indicators on the MMSE scale, direct reproduction of the 5-word test, significant changes in the evaluation of work efficiency when performing the Schulte test. CONCLUSION: It should be noted that the positive results of this study can be considered a decrease in the severity and severity of asthenia symptoms, a decrease in anxiety manifestations, and an improvement in cognitive functions against the background of complex neurotropic therapy with Cortexin and Recognan. Preference in this situation should be given to drugs with a multimodal mechanism of action, as well as creating optimal combinations of drugs that potentiate each other's action.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognition Disorders , Asthenia/drug therapy , Asthenia/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Cognition , Cognition Disorders/drug therapy , Humans , Syndrome
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785634

ABSTRACT

Older adults are vulnerable towards cognitive frailty that can lead to adverse health outcomes and telerehabilitation appears to be a potential platform to reverse cognitive frailty among older adults. The aim of this coping review is to identify the usage of telerehabilitation and its common platform of delivery among older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or cognitive frailty (CF). Articles published from January 2015 until October 2020 were selected. Out of the 1738 articles retrieved, six studies were identified. Two articles were randomized controlled trials, one was a pilot study and three were qualitative studies. The outcome suggests that telerehabilitation may improve the quality of life among participants as well as it can be a useful and supportive digital platform for health care. Some types of technologies commonly used were smartphones or telephones with internet, television-based assistive integrated technology, mobile application and videoconference. Telerehabilitation utilization in managing cognitive frailty among older adults is still limited and more research is required to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability. Although telerehabilitation appears to be implemented among older adults with MCI and CF, some social support is still required to improve the adherence and effectiveness of telerehabilitation. Future research should focus on the evaluation of acceptance and participants' existing knowledge towards telerehabilitation to achieve its target.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction , Frailty , Telerehabilitation , Aged , Cognition , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Humans , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
6.
Front Public Health ; 10: 809713, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776007

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Despite the theoretical and practical interest in Internet use among older adults, evidence examining the impacts of Internet use on late-in-life health is limited. This study examines how Internet use affects depression and cognitive function in older adults and investigates if Internet use moderates the relationship between social isolation and depression/cognitive function. Method: We performed regression analyses using data came from the second wave of the China Longitudinal Aging Social Survey of 2016. Our final sample featured 8,835 older adults. Results: The results show 11.4% of Chinese older adults often used the Internet to engage in at least one activity. Internet use was negatively associated with depression, but it was positively related to cognitive function. Socially isolated older adults were more likely to have more depressive symptoms and higher level of cognitive function. There was also an interaction effect between Internet use and social isolation on depression/cognitive function. The negative effect of social isolation was stronger for older adults who used the Internet less. The moderating effect of Internet use was significant for both males and females. However, among those who used the Internet more, the depression levels of socially isolated male participants were much lower than female participants. Conclusions: Our results reveal the importance of considering Internet use in buffering the negative effects of social isolation and the associated health burdens for aging populations. Recommendations for service practice and future research are discussed.


Subject(s)
Cognition , Depression , Social Isolation , Aged , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Internet Use , Male , Social Isolation/psychology
7.
Front Public Health ; 9: 753671, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775950

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate the effects of age, period, and cohort (APC) on trends in cognitive function among the Chinese elderly, and to explore how gender gaps in cognitive function change with age, period, and cohort. Methods: This study used data from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) from 1998 to 2018, and included 90,432 participants aged above 65 years old. The measurement of cognitive function was the score of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Cross-classified random-effect models were used to investigate age, period, and cohort trends in cognitive function. Results: Mini-Mental State Examination scores decreased with age at an increasing rate. While the cohort effect was nearly stable, the period effect demonstrated a downward trend from 1998 to 2002 followed by a nearly flat line. Females were associated with lower MMSE scores than males. When age increased, the gender gaps in MMSE scores further increased. The period-based gender gaps in MMSE scores diverged throughout the 20 years, while the cohort-based gender disparities in MMSE scores converged with successive cohorts. Conclusions: Age, period, and cohort had different and independent effects on cognitive function among the Chinese elderly. The effect of age was stronger than that of period and cohort. Gender disparities in cognitive function increased with age and period, and decreased with successive cohorts.


Subject(s)
Cognition , Aged , China/epidemiology , Cognition/physiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Longevity , Male
8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 751828, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775939

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Despite growing recognition of hearing loss as a risk factor for late life cognitive disorders, sex and gender analysis of this association has been limited. Elucidating this is one means to advocate for holistic medicine by considering the psychosocial attributes of people. With a composite Gender Score (GS), we aimed to assess this among aging participants (50+) from the 2016 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) cohort. Methods: The GS was derived from gender-related variables in HRS by factor analyses and logistic regression, ranging from 0 (toward masculinity) to 100 (toward femininity). GS tertiles were also used to indicate three gender types (GS tertile 1: lower GS indicates masculinity; GS tertile 2: middle GS indicates androgyny; GS tertile 3: higher GS indicates femininity). Univariate followed by multiple logistic regressions were used to estimate the Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of cognitive impairment (assessed by adapted Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status) from hearing acuity, as well as to explore the interactions of sex and gender with hearing acuity. The risk of cognitive impairment among hearing-impaired participants was assessed using multivariable models including sex and gender as exposure variables. Results: Five variables (taking risks, loneliness, housework, drinking, and depression) were retained to compute the GS for each participant. The distribution of GS between sexes partly overlapped. After adjusting for confounding factors, the OR for cognitive impairment associated with hearing impairment was significantly higher (OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.26, 2.15), and this association was not modified by female sex (OR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.46, 1.27), but by androgynous gender (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24, 0.81). In the multivariable models for participants with hearing impairment, androgynous and feminine gender, as opposed to female sex, was associated with lower odds of cognitive impairment (OR of GS tertile 2 = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.84; OR of GS tertile 3 = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.87; OR of female sex = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.57, 1.08). Conclusions: Hearing impairment was associated with cognitive impairment among older people, and this association may be attenuated by a more feminine GS.


Subject(s)
Hearing Loss , Aged , Cognition , Female , Femininity , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Retirement
9.
J Healthc Eng ; 2022: 1773259, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775006

ABSTRACT

Automated disease prediction has now become a key concern in medical research due to exponential population growth. The automated disease identification framework aids physicians in diagnosing disease, which delivers accurate disease prediction that provides rapid outcomes and decreases the mortality rate. The spread of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has a significant effect on public health and the everyday lives of individuals currently residing in more than 100 nations. Despite effective attempts to reach an appropriate trend to forecast COVID-19, the origin and mutation of the virus is a crucial obstacle in the diagnosis of the detected cases. Even so, the development of a model to forecast COVID-19 from chest X-ray (CXR) and computerized tomography (CT) images with the correct decision is critical to assist with intelligent detection. In this paper, a proposed hybrid model of the artificial neural network (ANN) with parameters optimization by the butterfly optimization algorithm has been introduced. The proposed model was compared with the pretrained AlexNet, GoogLeNet, and the SVM to identify the publicly accessible COVID-19 chest X-ray and CT images. There were six datasets for the examinations: three datasets with X-ray pictures and three with CT images. The experimental results approved the superiority of the proposed model for cognitive COVID-19 pattern recognition with average accuracy 90.48, 81.09, 86.76, and 84.97% for the proposed model, support vector machine (SVM), AlexNet, and GoogLeNet, respectively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Algorithms , Cognition , Humans , Neural Networks, Computer , Support Vector Machine
10.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e059988, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774970

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Physical exercise and cognitive training have the potential to enhance cognitive function and mobility in older adults at risk of Alzheimer's disease and related dementia (ADRD), but little is known about the feasibility of delivering multidomain interventions in home settings of older adults at risk of ADRD. This study aims to assess the feasibility of home-based delivery of exercise and cognitive interventions, and to evaluate the relationship between participants' intervention preferences and their subsequent adherence. Secondary objectives include the effect of the interventions on ADRD risk factors, including frailty, mobility, sleep, diet and psychological health. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The SYNchronising Exercises, Remedies in GaIt and Cognition at Home (SYNERGIC@Home) feasibility trial is a randomised control trial that follows a 2×2 factorial design, with a 16-week home-based intervention programme (3 sessions per week) of physical exercises and cognitive training. Participants will be randomised in blocks of four to one of the following four arms: (1) combined exercise (aerobic and resistance)+cognitive training (NEUROPEAK); (2) combined exercise+control cognitive training (web searching); (3) control exercise (balance and toning)+cognitive training; and (4) control exercise+control cognitive training. SYNERGIC@Home will be implemented through video conferencing. Baseline and post-intervention assessments at 4-month and 10-month follow-up will include measures of cognition, frailty, mobility, sleep, diet and psychological health. Primary feasibility outcome is adherence to the interventions. Primary analytic outcome is the relationship between pre-allocation preference for a given intervention and subsequent adherence to the allocated intervention. A series of secondary analytic outcomes examining the potential effect of the individual and combined interventions on cognitive, mobility and general well-being will be measured at baseline and follow-up. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was granted by the relevant research ethics boards. Findings of the study will be presented to stakeholders and published in peer-reviewed journals and at provincial, national and international conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04997681, Pre-results.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , Cognition , Aged , Double-Blind Method , Exercise , Feasibility Studies , Gait , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
11.
Occup Ther Int ; 2022: 4605989, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770033

ABSTRACT

Background: Multidisciplinary rehabilitation including occupational therapy after COVID-19 is recommended. However, evidence on how COVID-19 affects the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) is sparse. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the ability to perform ADL and cognitive status in patients with COVID-19 at time of discharge and three months postdischarge. Methods: This prospective multiple case study included adults with COVID-19, who at time of discharge had decreased ADL performance compared to habitual functional level. Data collection included Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) at discharge and three-month follow-up. Exploratory analysis was used to identify similarities and trends within and across cases. Results: Eleven patients were included. 75% had a significant increase in motor ability measures, and 27% had a significant increase in process ability measures at follow-up. 67% of follow-up cases showed mild cognitive impairment, where executive functioning and memory were most predominant. Conclusions: The ability to perform ADL was affected at discharge and at three-month follow-up. Furthermore, mild cognitive impairment was present at both hospital discharge and follow-up in most cases. Significance. Occupational therapists can apply performance-based assessments to identify the need for rehabilitation of ADL in patients with COVID-19 during and posthospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Therapy , Activities of Daily Living , Adult , Aftercare , Cognition , Hospitalization , Humans , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies
12.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 5496, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768853

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is accompanied by chronic neurological sequelae such as cognitive decline and mood disorder, but the underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. We explored the possibility that the brain-infiltrating SARS-CoV-2 spike protein contributes to the development of neurological symptoms observed in COVID-19 patients in this study. Our behavioral study showed that administration of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein S1 subunit (S1 protein) to mouse hippocampus induced cognitive deficit and anxiety-like behavior in vivo. These neurological symptoms were accompanied by neuronal cell death in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus as well as glial cell activation. Interestingly, the S1 protein did not directly induce hippocampal cell death in vitro. Rather, it exerted neurotoxicity via glial cell activation, partially through interleukin-1ß induction. In conclusion, our data suggest a novel pathogenic mechanism for the COVID-19-associated neurological symptoms that involves glia activation and non-cell autonomous hippocampal neuronal death by the brain-infiltrating S1 protein.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Anxiety , Cell Death , Cognition , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Hippocampus/metabolism , Humans , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Mice , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism
13.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e32598, 2022 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745190

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and its associated lockdown measures impacted mental health worldwide. However, the temporal dynamics of causal factors that modulate mental health during lockdown are not well understood. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to understand how a COVID-19 lockdown changes the temporal dynamics of loneliness and other factors affecting mental health. This is the first study that compares network characteristics between lockdown stages to prioritize mental health intervention targets. METHODS: We combined ecological momentary assessments with wrist-worn motion tracking to investigate the mechanism and changes in network centrality of symptoms and behaviors before and during lockdown. A total of 258 participants who reported at least mild loneliness and distress were assessed 8 times a day for 7 consecutive days over a 213-day period from August 8, 2020, through March 9, 2021, in Germany, covering a "no-lockdown" and a "lockdown" stage. COVID-19-related worry, information-seeking, perceived restriction, and loneliness were assessed by digital visual analog scales ranging from 0 to 100. Social activity was assessed on a 7-point Likert scale, while physical activity was recorded from wrist-worn actigraphy devices. RESULTS: We built a multilevel vector autoregressive model to estimate dynamic networks. To compare network characteristics between a no-lockdown stage and a lockdown stage, we performed permutation tests. During lockdown, loneliness had the highest impact within the network, as indicated by its centrality index (ie, an index to identify variables that have a strong influence on the other variables). Moreover, during lockdown, the centrality of loneliness significantly increased. Physical activity contributed to a decrease in loneliness amid the lockdown stage. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 lockdown increased the central role of loneliness in triggering stress-related behaviors and cognition. Our study indicates that loneliness should be prioritized in mental health interventions during lockdown. Moreover, physical activity can serve as a buffer for loneliness amid social restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cognition , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Braz J Anesthesiol ; 72(1): 7-12, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739566

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction may result from worsening in a condition of previous impairment. It causes greater difficulty in recovery, longer hospital stays, and consequent delay in returning to work activities. Digital games have a potential neuromodulatory and rehabilitation effect. In this study, a digital game was used as a neuropsychological test to assess postoperative cognitive dysfunction, with preoperative patient performance as control. METHODS: It was a non-controlled study, with patients selected among candidates for elective non-cardiac surgery, evaluated in the pre- and postoperative periods. The digital game used has six phases developed to evaluate selective attention, alternating attention, visuoperception, inhibitory control, short-term memory, and long-term memory. The digital game takes about 25 minutes. Scores are the sum of correct answers in each cognitive domain. Statistical analysis compared these cognitive functions pre- and post-surgery using a generalized linear mixed model (ANCOVA). RESULTS: Sixty patients were evaluated, 40% male and 60% female, with a mean age of 52.7 ± 13.5 years. Except for visuoperception, a reduction in post-surgery scores was found in all phases of the digital game. CONCLUSION: The digital game was able to detect decline in several cognitive functions postoperatively. As its completion is faster than in conventional tests on paper, this digital game may be a potentially recommended tool for assessing patients, especially the elderly and in the early postoperative period.


Subject(s)
Postoperative Cognitive Complications , Adult , Aged , Cognition , Female , Humans , Male , Memory, Short-Term , Middle Aged , Neuropsychological Tests
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736924

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recognizing the under-examined socio-cognitive mindfulness and achievement emotions in nursing, this study aimed to examine the relationships between grit, socio-cognitive mindfulness, and achievement emotions among nursing students, as well as the mediating effects of socio-cognitive mindfulness. METHODS: This study utilized a cross-sectional design. A total of 220 nursing students in Korea completed the questionnaire measuring the levels of grit, socio-cognitive mindfulness, and achievement emotions. To analyze data, structural equation modeling and path analysis were performed. RESULTS: Grit was positively related to socio-cognitive mindfulness and positive achievement emotions but negatively related to negative emotions. Socio-cognitive mindfulness was positively related to positive emotions but negatively related to negative emotions. In addition, the mediating effects of socio-cognitive mindfulness were found in the association between grit and achievement emotions in nursing students. CONCLUSIONS: Grittier students tend to have higher socio-cognitive mindfulness and positive emotions but lower negative emotions in learning environments. Mediating effects highlight the benefits of socio-cognitive mindfulness in the context of nursing education, providing the basis for developing practical mindfulness programs to cultivate nursing students' socio-cognitive mindfulness.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Students, Nursing , Cognition , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology
16.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 107, 2022 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724473

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Innovative and student-centered teaching methods are required to improve critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an oncology internship training on learning outcomes of nursing students using an integrated teaching-learning method. METHODS: A pre- and post-test quasi-experimental study was conducted among 107 undergraduate nursing students in fourth year who were allocated to two groups (intervention group = 51 and control group = 55) to receive an integrated teaching-learning method and routine method respectively. Data was collected using the Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale (CDMNS) and the students' cognitive learning test. RESULTS: Difference in mean scores of cognitive learning test post-intervention was significant between the two groups (p < 0.001). Total CDMNS scores and its dimensions increased significantly for the intervention group post-intervention (p < 0.001). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that when the effect of confounding variables, such as the student's Grade Point Average (GPA) and the pre-test scores of cognitive learning and decision-making scale were held constant, the effect of the independent variable (group) on students' cognitive learning test (p = 0.002) and CDMNS (p = 0.004) was significant. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students' cognitive learning and clinical decision-making scores were improved as a result of the integrated teaching-learning method. Nursing educators can use this method in clinical education to improve students' cognitive and meta-cognitive skills, thereby improving nursing care quality.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Clinical Decision-Making , Cognition , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Humans , Learning , Students, Nursing/psychology
17.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e056190, 2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723811

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 infections have become an urgent worldwide public health concern. Although it is primarily a respiratory disease, up to two-thirds of hospitalised COVID-19 patients exhibit nervous system damage and an increased risk of frailty. In this study,we aim to investigate the relationship between frailty and cognitive function disorders in patients with COVID-19 with a systematic review and meta-analysis approach. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This meta-analysis has been registered by the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. We will search for relevant studies from PubMed, Embase, Chinese Biological Medical Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Database, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases, from their inception to 5 July 2021. We will also search reference lists of selected articles for additional studies. Our search strategy will have no language restrictions. We will employ a fixed or random-effects model to calculate OR and 95% CIs for pooled data, and assess heterogeneity using Cochrane's Q and I2 tests. The primary outcome will be the rate of cognitive disorders related to frailty in old patients with COVID-19. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not essential since data will be extracted from previously published studies. The results of this meta-analysis will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021257148.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , COVID-19/complications , China , Cognition , Frailty/complications , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
18.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 76: 45-48, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712633

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Many patients recovering from COVID-19 report persistent psychological and cognitive symptoms months after viral clearance. We examined the association of depression and COVID-induced PTSD with cognitive symptoms following COVID-19 illness. METHODS: Patients treated for COVID-19 between March 26 and May 27, 2020 were surveyed three months later. Cognitive symptoms were assessed by asking "Since your COVID-19 illness, do you now have more difficulty: 1) Remembering conversations a few days later? 2) Remembering where you placed familiar objects? 3) Finding the right words while speaking?" Patients endorsing at least one such complaint were coded positive for cognitive symptoms. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association of depression (PHQ-8 ≥ 10) and COVID-induced PTSD (PCL-5 ≥ 30) with cognitive symptoms, adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. RESULTS: Among 153 participants, 44.4% reported at least one cognitive symptom, 18.3% were depressed, and 23.5% had COVID-induced PTSD. Adjusting for covariates, depression (OR 5.15, 95% CI 1.30-20.35, p = 0.02) and COVID-induced PTSD (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.13-11.89, p = 0.03) were significantly associated with cognitive symptoms; self-reported history of mental illness was also associated (OR 4.90, 95% CI 1.24-19.41, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Depression, COVID-induced PTSD, and prior mental illness were strongly associated with cognitive symptoms three months after acute COVID-19 illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/complications , Cognition , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708249

ABSTRACT

Children's physical activity participation declined during the COVID-19 pandemic, and these negative changes could lead to longer-term impacts on children's cognitive, social, and emotional health. PURPOSE: To determine parent/caregivers' perceptions of their children's cognitive function, peer and family relationships, life satisfaction, physical activity, sleep, positive affect, and global health, before and after participating in the Build Our Kids' Success (BOKS) programming at after-school programs in Fall 2020. METHODS: Parents of children participating in the BOKS programming at after-school programs in Nova Scotia, Canada, were recruited. At baseline, 159 parents completed the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measures Information System (PROMIS) parent-proxy questionnaire, and 75 parents completed the measures at follow-up. Independent t-tests were used to determine if there were differences between baseline and follow-up Parent Proxy Questionnaire data. RESULTS: All NIH PROMIS outcome variables at baseline and follow-up were within normal limits (Adjusted T-Scores: 46.67 ± 7.15 to 50.04 ± 7.13). There were no significant differences in life satisfaction (t(188) = -1.05, p = 0.30), family relationships (t(189) = 0.31, p = 0.76), cognitive function (t(199) = -1.16, p = 0.25), peer relationships (t(192) = -1.86, p = 0.06), positive affect (t(195) = 0.25, p = 0.81), global health (t(216) = -0.43, p = 0.67), physical activity (t(202) = 0.787, p = 0.732), sleep disturbance (t(193) = 1.72, p = 0.087), or psychological stress (t(196) = 1.896, p = 0.059), from baseline to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Parent-proxy questionnaires suggested that the BOKS programming had a protective effect on children's health behaviours and cognitive, social, and emotional health as values remained within normal limits and were not impacted by the public health restrictions during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Nova Scotia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cognition , Exercise , Humans , Nova Scotia/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(2): e33337, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699900

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown a high prevalence of depression during pregnancy, and there is also evidence that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the most effective psychosocial interventions. Emerging evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has shown that technology has been successfully harnessed to provide CBT interventions for other populations. However, very few studies have focused on their use during pregnancy. This approach has become increasingly important in many clinical areas due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and our study aimed to expand the knowledge in this particular clinical area. OBJECTIVE: Our systematic review aimed to bring together the available research-based evidence on digitalized CBT interventions for depression symptoms during pregnancy. METHODS: A systematic review of the Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Scopus, ClinicalTrials.gov, and EBSCO Open Dissertations databases was carried out from the earliest available evidence to October 27, 2021. Only RCT studies published in English were considered. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines were followed, and the protocol was registered on the Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. The risk of bias was assessed using the revised Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomized trials. RESULTS: The review identified 7 studies from 5 countries (the United States, China, Australia, Norway, and Sweden) published from 2015 to 2021. The sample sizes ranged from 25 to 1342 participants. The interventions used various technological elements, including text, images, videos, games, interactive features, and peer group discussions. They comprised 2 guided and 5 unguided approaches. Using digitalized CBT interventions for depression during pregnancy showed promising efficacy, with guided intervention showing higher effect sizes (Hedges g=1.21) than the unguided interventions (Hedges g=0.14-0.99). The acceptability of the digitalized CBT interventions was highly encouraging, based on user feedback. Attrition rates were low for the guided intervention (4.5%) but high for the unguided interventions (22.1%-46.5%). A high overall risk of bias was present for 6 of the 7 studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our search only identified a small number of digitalized CBT interventions for pregnant women, despite the potential of this approach. These showed promising evidence when it came to efficacy and positive outcomes for depression symptoms, and user feedback was positive. However, the overall risk of bias suggests that the efficacy of the interventions needs to be interpreted with caution. Future studies need to consider how to mitigate these sources of biases. Digitalized CBT interventions can provide prompt, effective, evidence-based interventions for pregnant women. This review increases our understanding of the importance of digitalized interventions during pregnancy, including during the COVID-19 pandemic. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews CRD42020216159; https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=216159.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Cognition , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Depression/therapy , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
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