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1.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 16(2): 102395, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616466

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the latest evidence on the association between colchicine and mortality in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a comprehensive literature search from the PubMed, Scopus, Embase, EuropePMC, and Clinicaltrials.gov up until 02 January 2022. We include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies reporting colchicine use in patients with COVID-19 and mortality within 30 days. The intervention group was patients given colchicine during the course of treatment. The control group was patients given placebo or standard of care at the respective institutions. The outcome was mortality. The effect estimate was reported as risk ratio (RR). RESULTS: There were 12 studies comprising of 6953 patients included in this meta-analysis. Mortality rate was 0.18 [95%CI 0.10, 0.26] in the colchicine group and 0.26 [95%CI 0.15, 0.38] in the control group. Colchicine was associated with reduction in mortality (RR 0.66 [95%CI 0.53, 0.83], p < 0.001; I2: 42%). Sensitivity analysis using fixed-effect model (RR 0.73 [95%CI 0.63, 0.83], p < 0.001; I2: 42%. Subgroup analysis on the four RCTs showed non-significant result (RR 0.81 [95%CI 0.54, 1.20], p = 0.29; I2: 10%). Meta-regression showed that the association between colchicine and reduced mortality was not affected by age (p = 0.613) [Fig. 3], sex (p = 0.915), diabetes (p = 0.795), and hypertension (p = 0.403). CONCLUSION: Though the meta-analysis showed decreased mortality with colchicine in patients with COVID-19, the meta-analysis of randomized trials did not show any significant effect of colchicine on mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Colchicine/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Aged , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Virus Replication/drug effects
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(22): 7151-7161, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1552082

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of colchicine, compared with standard of care, for reducing mortality, admission to intensive care, and use of mechanical ventilation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a systematic review, meta-analysis, and sequential trial analysis. The terms (SARS-CoV-2 OR COVID-19 OR coronavirus) AND (colchicine) were searched in MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and preprint repositories (February 2020 to April 2021, extended to June 2021). Risk of bias for randomised controlled trials and observational studies were assessed using the tools RoB 2.0 and ROBINS-I, respectively. We performed subgroup analyses based on study design and sensitivity analyses based on time of colchicine administration. RESULTS: We included six observational studies (1329 patients) and five clinical trials (16,048 patients). All studies but one were conducted in the hospital setting. Colchicine treatment was not associated with a significant decrease in mortality (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.87 to 1; p=0.06, I2=72%) with a significant subgroup effect (p<0.001) depending on the design of the studies. The drug was effective in observational studies (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.70, p<0.001, I2=50%) but not in clinical trials (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.07, p=0.89, I2=21%). The effect of colchicine on intensive care admissions and the need for mechanical ventilation could not be confirmed. Trial sequential boundaries for cumulative meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials suggested no significant effect on mortality (p=0.182) beyond the optimal information size (13,107 patients). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that colchicine treatment has no effect on mortality in hospitalised patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, and that no further confirmatory clinical trials are needed owing to futility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Colchicine/therapeutic use , Tubulin Modulators/therapeutic use , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Clinical Trials as Topic , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Observational Studies as Topic , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Treatment Outcome , Tubulin Modulators/administration & dosage
3.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(8): 924-932, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413874

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests a role for excessive inflammation in COVID-19 complications. Colchicine is an oral anti-inflammatory medication beneficial in gout, pericarditis, and coronary disease. We aimed to investigate the effect of colchicine on the composite of COVID-19-related death or hospital admission. METHODS: The present study is a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, adaptive, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial. The study was done in Brazil, Canada, Greece, South Africa, Spain, and the USA, and was led by the Montreal Heart Institute. Patients with COVID-19 diagnosed by PCR testing or clinical criteria who were not being treated in hospital were eligible if they were at least 40 years old and had at least one high-risk characteristic. The randomisation list was computer-generated by an unmasked biostatistician, and masked randomisation was centralised and done electronically through an automated interactive web-response system. The allocation sequence was unstratified and used a 1:1 ratio with a blocking schema and block sizes of six. Patients were randomly assigned to receive orally administered colchicine (0·5 mg twice per day for 3 days and then once per day for 27 days thereafter) or matching placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was the composite of death or hospital admission for COVID-19. Vital status at the end of the study was available for 97·9% of patients. The analyses were done according to the intention-to-treat principle. The COLCORONA trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04322682) and is now closed to new participants. FINDINGS: Trial enrolment began in March 23, 2020, and was completed in Dec 22, 2020. A total of 4488 patients (53·9% women; median age 54·0 years, IQR 47·0-61·0) were enrolled and 2235 patients were randomly assigned to colchicine and 2253 to placebo. The primary endpoint occurred in 104 (4·7%) of 2235 patients in the colchicine group and 131 (5·8%) of 2253 patients in the placebo group (odds ratio [OR] 0·79, 95·1% CI 0·61-1·03; p=0·081). Among the 4159 patients with PCR-confirmed COVID-19, the primary endpoint occurred in 96 (4·6%) of 2075 patients in the colchicine group and 126 (6·0%) of 2084 patients in the placebo group (OR 0·75, 0·57-0·99; p=0·042). Serious adverse events were reported in 108 (4·9%) of 2195 patients in the colchicine group and 139 (6·3%) of 2217 patients in the placebo group (p=0·051); pneumonia occurred in 63 (2·9%) of 2195 patients in the colchicine group and 92 (4·1%) of 2217 patients in the placebo group (p=0·021). Diarrhoea was reported in 300 (13·7%) of 2195 patients in the colchicine group and 161 (7·3%) of 2217 patients in the placebo group (p<0·0001). INTERPRETATION: In community-treated patients including those without a mandatory diagnostic test, the effect of colchicine on COVID-19-related clinical events was not statistically significant. Among patients with PCR-confirmed COVID-19, colchicine led to a lower rate of the composite of death or hospital admission than placebo. Given the absence of orally administered therapies to prevent COVID-19 complications in community-treated patients and the benefit of colchicine in patients with PCR-proven COVID-19, this safe and inexpensive anti-inflammatory agent could be considered for use in those at risk of complications. Notwithstanding these considerations, replication in other studies of PCR-positive community-treated patients is recommended. FUNDING: The Government of Quebec, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the US National Institutes of Health, the Montreal Heart Institute Foundation, the NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the Rudin Family Foundation, and philanthropist Sophie Desmarais.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colchicine , Administration, Oral , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Colchicine/adverse effects , Double-Blind Method , Drug Monitoring/methods , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intention to Treat Analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
5.
Pathog Glob Health ; 115(4): 243-249, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109109

ABSTRACT

Data on the clinical features and outcomes of COVID-19 patients from countries with low disease burden are rare. Greece, however, presented a low burden of COVID-19 disease during the first pandemic outbreak. This is a retrospective study of COVID-19 hospitalized patients in Greece. Clinical data were extracted from medical records using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses to assess the factors associated with Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission and in-hospital death. Eighty-five patients were included in this study, 49 (57.7%) male with median (25th-75th) age 60 (49-72) years old. Sixty-one (72%) of them had at least one comorbidity with hypertension being the most common (45,6%). More than half (56%) had severe or critical disease, 20% required ICU care (14% received invasive ventilation) and 10.7% died. Solid tumor (p = 0.021) and NEWS score (p = 0.048), thrombocytopenia (p = 0.036) or involvement of all lung fields in chest x-ray (p = 0.002) on admission were independent risk factors for ICU admission. Immunosuppression (p = 0.032) and thrombocytopenia (p = 0.049) were independent predictors of death. Hospitalized COVID-19 patients in a European country with a low burden of the disease, in which hospital capacities had not been overwhelmed, had lower mortality rate compared to those reported for patients hospitalized in regions with a high burden of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adrenal Cortex Hormones , Adult , Aged , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/administration & dosage , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Colchicine/therapeutic use , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Greece/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
6.
RMD Open ; 7(1)2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066938

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the addition of colchicine to standard treatment for COVID-19 results in better outcomes. DESIGN: We present the results of a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial of colchicine for the treatment of moderate to severe COVID-19, with 75 patients allocated 1:1 from 11 April to 30 August 2020. Colchicine regimen was 0.5 mg thrice daily for 5 days, then 0.5 mg twice daily for 5 days. The primary endpoints were the need for supplemental oxygen, time of hospitalisation, need for admission and length of stay in intensive care unit and death rate. RESULTS: Seventy-two patients (36 for placebo and 36 for colchicine) completed the study. Median (and IQR) time of need for supplemental oxygen was 4.0 (2.0-6.0) days for the colchicine group and 6.5 (4.0-9.0) days for the placebo group (p<0.001). Median (IQR) time of hospitalisation was 7.0 (5.0-9.0) days for the colchicine group and 9.0 (7.0-12.0) days for the placebo group (p=0.003). At day 2, 67% versus 86% of patients maintained the need for supplemental oxygen, while at day 7, the values were 9% versus 42%, in the colchicine and the placebo groups, respectively (log rank; p=0.001). Two patients died, both in placebo group. Diarrhoea was more frequent in the colchicine group (p=0.26). CONCLUSION: Colchicine reduced the length of both, supplemental oxygen therapy and hospitalisation. The drug was safe and well tolerated. Once death was an uncommon event, it is not possible to ensure that colchicine reduced mortality of COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: RBR-8jyhxh.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Length of Stay , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Colchicine/adverse effects , Diarrhea/chemically induced , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
7.
Semin Arthritis Rheum ; 51(1): 101-112, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Colchicine has been used historically as an anti-inflammatory agent for a wide range of diseases. Little is known regarding the relationship between colchicine use and infectious disease outcomes. The objective of this study was to systematically examine infectious adverse events associated with colchicine usage and the clinical use of colchicine for infectious diseases. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA methodology. PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases were searched (up to 12th October, 2020) for interventional and observational studies that included colchicine usage associated with infectious adverse events or infectious disease outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 9,237 studies were initially identified and after exclusions, 36 articles comprising 21 interventional studies and 15 observational studies were included in this systematic review. There were 19 studies that reported infectious adverse events and 17 studies that examined the efficacy of colchicine in treating infectious disease. Only two out of six studies reported a significant benefit using colchicine in the management of viral liver disease. There was some evidence colchicine is beneficial in managing COVID-19 by reducing time to deterioration, length of stay in hospital and mortality. Colchicine had some benefit in managing malaria, condyloma accuminata and verruca vulgaris, viral myocarditis and erythema nodosum leprosum based on case-series or small, pilot clinical studies. Two of the clinical trials and five of the observational studies reported significant associations between infections adverse events and colchicine usage. Risk of pneumonia was found in three studies and post-operative infections were reported in two studies. Risks of urinary tract infections, H. pylori and C.difficile were only reported by one study each. CONCLUSION: There is a current lack of clinical evidence that colchicine has a role in treating or managing infectious diseases. Preliminary studies have demonstrated a possible role in the management of COVID-19 but results from more clinical trials are needed. There is inconclusive evidence that suggests colchicine is associated with increased risk of infections, particularly pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , Colchicine/adverse effects , Communicable Diseases/drug therapy , Adult , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(36): e21911, 2020 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-752029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV2) infection is a recently emerged viral infection causing predominantly mild upper respiratory symptoms. However, in some instances, it might result in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that poses a significant mortality risk. ARDS is postulated to be mediated by a surge of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, leading to a dysregulated hyper inflammatory response. Colchicine being an anti-inflammatory agent, might mitigate this dysregulated response. Thus, in the absence of therapeutic options available to manage coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it is imperative to ascertain the effect of colchicine on improving outcomes in COVID-19 patients. METHOD: We will perform a systematic review including a search of the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Clinicaltrials.gov, Cochrane library, and google scholar since inception. We will include randomized controlled trials exploring the effect of colchicine on the efficacy and safety outcomes of COVID-19 patients. Subsequently, we will perform a meta-analysis utilizing the random-effects to ascertain the effect of colchicine on reducing COVID-19 related mortality (primary endpoint) and other efficacy and safety outcomes. RESULTS: Our review results are anticipated in early 2021 (based on the completion of several ongoing randomized controlled trial). Our review results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: This systematic review and meta-analysis, is exploring the effect of colchicine on the efficacy and safety outcomes of COVID-19 patients. If colchicine proved to be effective, it would be a significant milestone in the management of COVID-19, a disease with limited available therapeutic options. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020191086.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Colchicine/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Colchicine/adverse effects , Humans , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Immunol Invest ; 50(8): 884-890, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635761

ABSTRACT

We describe the case of a 42 year old, healthy patient with Covid-19 who despite improvement in his respiratory symptoms developed a mild to moderate cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and an associated monoarticular gout flare. Since the patient refused admission to the hospital and had stable vital signs, we chose to treat him with a safe anti-inflammatory and non-immunosuppressive therapy. To hit two birds with one stone, we considered colchicine, as it has systemic anti-inflammatory effects and is also effective in gout flare. Unexpectedly, 48 hours after treatment, not only did his ongoing fever and toe pain disappear, he also had significant improvements in his general state of health and all his inflammatory markers including fibrinogen, ferritin, D-dimer, and IL-6 levels normalized. To our knowledge, the use of colchicine in Covid-19 and CRS has not been reported. This observation merits the consideration of colchicine as a safe, inexpensive and oral medication for the treatment of mild to moderate CRS in Covid-19 patients. More importantly, in Covid-19 patients with early lung involvement colchicine may be an appropriate candidate to prevent CRS in adjunction with routine antiviral agents. Indeed, multicenter, randomized controlled studies are required to evaluate the benefits of this therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Gout/drug therapy , Administration, Oral , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Gout/diagnosis , Gout/immunology , Gout/virology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Treatment Outcome
10.
In Vivo ; 34(3 Suppl): 1567-1588, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-532631

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) a pandemic. Since then, thousands of people have suffered and died, making the need for a treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) more crucial than ever. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors carried out a search in PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov and New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) for COVID-19 to provide information on the most promising treatments against SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: Possible COVID-19 agents with promising efficacy and favorable safety profile were identified. The results support the combination of copper, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), colchicine and nitric oxide (NO) with candidate antiviral agents, remdesivir or EIDD-2801, as a treatment for patients positive for SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSION: The authors propose to study the effects of the combination of copper, NAC, colchicine, NO and currently used experimental antiviral agents, remdesivir or EIDD-2801, as a potential treatment scheme for SARS-COV-2.


Subject(s)
Acetylcysteine/therapeutic use , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Colchicine/therapeutic use , Copper/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Nitric Oxide/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Ribonucleosides/therapeutic use , Acetylcysteine/administration & dosage , Acetylcysteine/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Adjuvants, Immunologic/therapeutic use , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Autophagy/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Colchicine/pharmacology , Copper/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Cytidine/analogs & derivatives , Drug Synergism , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Hydroxylamines , Inflammation , Nitric Oxide/administration & dosage , Nitric Oxide/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Prodrugs/administration & dosage , Prodrugs/therapeutic use , Ribonucleosides/administration & dosage , Ribonucleosides/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
11.
Trials ; 21(1): 489, 2020 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-529824

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Colchicine is a well-known drug, which has been used for years to treat a wide range of rheumatic and inflammatory disorders. It helps break the cycle of inflammation through diverse mechanisms including reducing Intereukin-6, Interleukin-8, Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha besides controlling oxidative stress pathways which all are important and pathologic components in the clinical course and outcome of patients infected with COVID-19. This study aims to assess the anti-inflammatory effects of colchicine in non-severe hospitalized COVID-19 patients. TRIAL DESIGN: Prospective, randomized (1:1 ratio), double blind study with parallel group design. PARTICIPANTS: Hospitalized patients with positive nasopharyngeal swab for COVID-19 infection (RT -PCR) and lung Computed tomography scan involvement compatible with COVID-19 pneumonia. The patients are not severely hypoxic, do not need intubation or invasive oxygenation. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: known hypersensitivity to colchicine; known hepatic failure; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<30 ml/min/1.73m2 (by the CKD-EPI Creatinine Equation for Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) which estimates GFR based on serum creatinine. ; kidney transplant recipients, using Digoxin, QTc >450 msec. Participants will be recruited from inpatients at Labbafinejad Meidcal Center , Tehran, Iran. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Eligible enrolled patients will be randomized into two groups. Group A will receive the antiretroviral Lopinavir/Ritonavir (Kaletra) while group B will receive Lopinavir/Ritonavir (Kaletra) + Colchicine 1.5 mg loading then 0.5 mg twice daily orally. All patients in both groups will receive the same amounts of essential minerals, vitamins as antioxidants, and antibiotics. Patients of both groups will be treated under optimal treatment based on the CDC and WHO guidelines and national consensus proposed in Iran including the same dosages of Lopinavir/Ritonavir, antibiotics, trace elements and antioxidants while only in group-B patients Colchicine will be added on top of this protocol. MAIN OUTCOMES: Primary: Time for clinical improvement and lung CT score changes 14 days after treatment. Secondary: 14 days after treatment - C-Reactive Protein test x Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio , Interleukin-6, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels reduction - Percentage of patients who require supplemental Oxygen - Mean hospital stay length RANDOMISATION: Patients will be allocated to each group (ratio 1:1) by using an online randomization tool: http://www.graphpad.com/quickcalcs/index.cfm BLINDING (MASKING): This will be a double-blind study in which participants and those assessing the final outcomes will be blinded to group assignment. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): Regarding the pandemic crisis and our center capacity to hospitalize confirmed COVID-19 patients, a total of 80 patients was found to be logical to be randomized into two groups of 40- patients. TRIAL STATUS: Recruitment is ongoing. Recruitment began on 20/03/2020 and the date by which the recruitment is anticipated to be completed is 30/05/2020. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04360980, registered 24/04/2020. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Lopinavir/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Double-Blind Method , Drug Combinations , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Hellenic J Cardiol ; 61(1): 42-45, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-40673

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Colchicine has been utilized safely in a variety of cardiovascular clinical conditions. Among its potential mechanisms of action is the non-selective inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome which is thought to be a major pathophysiologic component in the clinical course of patients with COVID-19. GRECCO-19 will be a prospective, randomized, open-labeled, controlled study to assess the effects of colchicine in COVID-19 complications prevention. METHODS: Patients with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection (under RT PCR) and clinical picture that involves temperature >37.5 oC and at least two out of the: i. sustained coughing, ii. sustained throat pain, iii. Anosmia and/or ageusia, iv. fatigue/tiredness, v. PaO2<95 mmHg will be included. Patients will be randomised (1:1) in colchicine or control group. RESULTS: Trial results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. CONCLUSION: GRECCO-19 trial aims to identify whether colchicine may positively intervene in the clinical course of COVID-19. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04326790).


Subject(s)
Colchicine , Coronavirus Infections , Heart Diseases , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Antirheumatic Agents/administration & dosage , Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Colchicine/administration & dosage , Colchicine/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Heart Diseases/blood , Heart Diseases/etiology , Heart Diseases/prevention & control , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment/methods , Troponin/analysis
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