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1.
Clin Transl Med ; 12(5): e831, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1858584

ABSTRACT

Tissue damage caused by an infection oran autoimmune disease triggers degradation of collagen in the extracellular matrix (ECM), which further enhances inflammation. Therefore, improving ECM in aninflamed tissue can be exploited as a potential therapeutic target. A recentstudy emphasised an innovative approach against COVID-19 using polymerised type I collagen (PTIC) that improves disease severity through a hitherto unknownmechanism. In this paper, we provide an overview of potential mechanism thatmay explain the anti-inflammatory effect of collagen peptides. In addition,the paper includes a brief summary of possible side effect of collagendeposition in inflammatory diseases. Altogether, current knowledge suggeststhat collagen may potentially reduce the residual risk in inflammatorydiseases; however, the detailed mechanism remains elusive.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/drug therapy , Collagen/metabolism , Collagen/pharmacology , Collagen Type I/metabolism , Collagen Type I/pharmacology , Extracellular Matrix/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/metabolism
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580700

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) followed by repair with lung remodeling is observed in COVID-19. These findings can lead to pulmonary terminal fibrosis, a form of irreversible sequelae. There is evidence that TGF-ß is intimately involved in the fibrogenic process. When activated, TGF-ß promotes the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and regulates the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this sense, the present study evaluated the histopathological features and immunohistochemical biomarkers (ACE-2, AKT-1, Caveolin-1, CD44v6, IL-4, MMP-9, α-SMA, Sphingosine-1, and TGF-ß1 tissue expression) involved in the TGF-ß1 signaling pathways and pulmonary fibrosis. The study consisted of 24 paraffin lung samples from patients who died of COVID-19 (COVID-19 group), compared to 10 lung samples from patients who died of H1N1pdm09 (H1N1 group) and 11 lung samples from patients who died of different causes, with no lung injury (CONTROL group). In addition to the presence of alveolar septal fibrosis, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) was found to be significantly increased in the COVID-19 group, associated with a higher density of Collagen I (mature) and III (immature). There was also a significant increase observed in the immunoexpression of tissue biomarkers ACE-2, AKT-1, CD44v6, IL-4, MMP-9, α-SMA, Sphingosine-1, and TGF-ß1 in the COVID-19 group. A significantly lower expression of Caveolin-1 was also found in this group. The results suggest the participation of TGF-ß pathways in the development process of pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, it would be plausible to consider therapy with TGF-ß inhibitors in those patients recovered from COVID-19 to mitigate a possible development of pulmonary fibrosis and its consequences for post-COVID-19 life quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism , Actins/metabolism , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Caveolin 1/metabolism , Collagen Type I/metabolism , Collagen Type III/metabolism , Female , Humans , Hyaluronan Receptors/metabolism , Immunohistochemistry , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/metabolism , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Influenza, Human/pathology , Interleukin-4/metabolism , Male , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/metabolism , Middle Aged , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Retrospective Studies , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism
3.
Neurobiol Dis ; 161: 105561, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510138

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). COVID-19 pathogenesis causes vascular-mediated neurological disorders via elusive mechanisms. SARS-CoV-2 infects host cells via the binding of viral Spike (S) protein to transmembrane receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Although brain pericytes were recently shown to abundantly express ACE2 at the neurovascular interface, their response to SARS-CoV-2 S protein is still to be elucidated. Using cell-based assays, we found that ACE2 expression in human brain vascular pericytes was increased upon S protein exposure. Pericytes exposed to S protein underwent profound phenotypic changes associated with an elongated and contracted morphology accompanied with an enhanced expression of contractile and myofibrogenic proteins, such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), fibronectin, collagen I, and neurogenic locus notch homolog protein-3 (NOTCH3). On the functional level, S protein exposure promoted the acquisition of calcium (Ca2+) signature of contractile ensheathing pericytes characterized by highly regular oscillatory Ca2+ fluctuations. Furthermore, S protein induced lipid peroxidation, oxidative and nitrosative stress in pericytes as well as triggered an immune reaction translated by activation of nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling pathway, which was potentiated by hypoxia, a condition associated with vascular comorbidities that exacerbate COVID-19 pathogenesis. S protein exposure combined to hypoxia enhanced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in immune cell activation and trafficking, namely macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Using transgenic mice expressing the human ACE2 that recognizes S protein, we observed that the intranasal infection with SARS-CoV-2 rapidly induced hypoxic/ischemic-like pericyte reactivity in the brain of transgenic mice, accompanied with an increased vascular expression of ACE2. Moreover, we found that SARS-CoV-2 S protein accumulated in the intranasal cavity reached the brain of mice in which the nasal mucosa is deregulated. Collectively, these findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 S protein impairs the vascular and immune regulatory functions of brain pericytes, which may account for vascular-mediated brain damage. Our study provides a better understanding for the mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular disorders in COVID-19, paving the way to develop new therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Pericytes/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Actins/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Brain/blood supply , COVID-19/physiopathology , Calcium Signaling , Collagen Type I/metabolism , Fibronectins/metabolism , Humans , Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain/physiopathology , Lipid Peroxidation/drug effects , Lipid Peroxidation/genetics , Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors/drug effects , Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/cytology , Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/metabolism , Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/cytology , Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/metabolism , Myofibroblasts , NF-kappa B/drug effects , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Nasal Mucosa , Nitrosative Stress , Oxidative Stress , Pericytes/cytology , Pericytes/drug effects , Phenotype , Receptor, Notch3/metabolism , Receptors, Coronavirus/drug effects , Receptors, Coronavirus/genetics , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/pharmacology
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(22)2020 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917002

ABSTRACT

Pro-inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß) are upregulated during early responses to tissue damage and are expected to transiently compromise the mechanical microenvironment. Fibroblasts are key regulators of tissue mechanics in the lungs and other organs. However, the effects of IL-1ß on fibroblast mechanics and functions remain unclear. Here we treated human pulmonary fibroblasts from control donors with IL-1ß and used Atomic Force Microscopy to unveil that IL-1ß significantly reduces the stiffness of fibroblasts concomitantly with a downregulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) and alpha-smooth muscle (α-SMA). Likewise, COL1A1 mRNA was reduced, whereas that of collagenases MMP1 and MMP2 were upregulated, favoring a reduction of type-I collagen. These mechanobiology changes were functionally associated with reduced proliferation and enhanced migration upon IL-1ß stimulation, which could facilitate lung repair by drawing fibroblasts to sites of tissue damage. Our observations reveal that IL-1ß may reduce local tissue rigidity by acting both intracellularly and extracellularly through the downregulation of fibroblast contractility and type I collagen deposition, respectively. These IL-1ß-dependent mechanical effects may enhance lung repair further by locally increasing pulmonary tissue compliance to preserve normal lung distension and function. Moreover, our results support that IL-1ß provides innate anti-fibrotic protection that may be relevant during the early stages of lung repair.


Subject(s)
Interleukin-1beta/physiology , Lung/physiology , Actins/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Biomechanical Phenomena , Cell Movement/drug effects , Cell Movement/physiology , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/physiology , Cells, Cultured , Collagen Type I/genetics , Collagen Type I/metabolism , Collagen Type III/genetics , Collagen Type III/metabolism , Cyclooxygenase 2/metabolism , Elasticity/drug effects , Elasticity/physiology , Female , Fibroblasts/cytology , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Fibroblasts/physiology , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/pharmacology , Lung/cytology , Lung/drug effects , Male , Microscopy, Atomic Force , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Regeneration/genetics , Regeneration/physiology , Wound Healing/drug effects , Wound Healing/genetics , Wound Healing/physiology , Young Adult
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