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1.
Genome Med ; 13(1): 64, 2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195928

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Immunosuppressive and anti-cytokine treatment may have a protective effect for patients with COVID-19. Understanding the immune cell states shared between COVID-19 and other inflammatory diseases with established therapies may help nominate immunomodulatory therapies. METHODS: To identify cellular phenotypes that may be shared across tissues affected by disparate inflammatory diseases, we developed a meta-analysis and integration pipeline that models and removes the effects of technology, tissue of origin, and donor that confound cell-type identification. Using this approach, we integrated > 300,000 single-cell transcriptomic profiles from COVID-19-affected lungs and tissues from healthy subjects and patients with five inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and interstitial lung disease. We tested the association of shared immune states with severe/inflamed status compared to healthy control using mixed-effects modeling. To define environmental factors within these tissues that shape shared macrophage phenotypes, we stimulated human blood-derived macrophages with defined combinations of inflammatory factors, emphasizing in particular antiviral interferons IFN-beta (IFN-ß) and IFN-gamma (IFN-γ), and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF. RESULTS: We built an immune cell reference consisting of > 300,000 single-cell profiles from 125 healthy or disease-affected donors from COVID-19 and five inflammatory diseases. We observed a CXCL10+ CCL2+ inflammatory macrophage state that is shared and strikingly abundant in severe COVID-19 bronchoalveolar lavage samples, inflamed RA synovium, inflamed CD ileum, and UC colon. These cells exhibited a distinct arrangement of pro-inflammatory and interferon response genes, including elevated levels of CXCL10, CXCL9, CCL2, CCL3, GBP1, STAT1, and IL1B. Further, we found this macrophage phenotype is induced upon co-stimulation by IFN-γ and TNF-α. CONCLUSIONS: Our integrative analysis identified immune cell states shared across inflamed tissues affected by inflammatory diseases and COVID-19. Our study supports a key role for IFN-γ together with TNF-α in driving an abundant inflammatory macrophage phenotype in severe COVID-19-affected lungs, as well as inflamed RA synovium, CD ileum, and UC colon, which may be targeted by existing immunomodulatory therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/genetics , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , Colitis, Ulcerative/genetics , Colitis, Ulcerative/immunology , Colon/immunology , Crohn Disease/genetics , Crohn Disease/immunology , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/genetics , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/immunology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/genetics , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Phenotype , RNA-Seq
2.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2227, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148855

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome related coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of Covid-19 which was classified as a global pandemic in March 2020. The increasing global health and economic burden of SARS-CoV-2 has necessitated urgent investigations into the pathogenesis of disease and development of therapeutic and vaccination regimens. Human trials of vaccine and antiviral candidates have been undertaken, but basic pathogenetic studies are still required to inform these trials. Gaps in understanding of cellular infection by, and immunity to, SARS-CoV-2 mean additional models are required to assist in improved design of these therapeutics. Human organoids are three-dimensional models that contain multiple cell types and mimic human organs in ex vivo culture conditions. The SARS-CoV-2 virus has been implicated in causing not only respiratory injury but also injury to other organs such as the brain, liver and kidneys. Consequently, a variety of different organoid models have been employed to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of disease due to SARS-CoV-2. Data on these models have not been systematically assembled. In this review, we highlight key findings from studies that have utilised different human organoid types to investigate the expression of SARS-CoV-2 receptors, permissiveness, immune response, dysregulation of cellular functions, and potential antiviral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Models, Biological , Organoids/immunology , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Brain/drug effects , Brain/immunology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Culture Techniques , Colon/drug effects , Colon/immunology , Colon/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Liver/drug effects , Liver/immunology , Liver/virology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Organoids/drug effects , Organoids/virology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
3.
Pharmacol Res ; 167: 105548, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135540

ABSTRACT

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is triggered by a variety of agents, including Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB). Interestingly, a significant proportion of patients with COVID-19, also develop ARDS. In the absence of effective treatments, ARDS results in almost 40% mortality. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that resveratrol (RES), a stilbenoid, with potent anti-inflammatory properties can attenuate SEB-induced ARDS. In the current study, we investigated the role of RES-induced alterations in the gut and lung microbiota in the regulation of ARDS. Our studies revealed that SEB administration induced inflammatory cytokines, ARDS, and 100% mortality in C3H/HeJ mice. Additionally, SEB caused a significant increase in pathogenic Proteobacteria phylum and Propionibacterium acnes species in the lungs. In contrast, RES treatment attenuated SEB-mediated ARDS and mortality in mice, and significantly increased probiotic Actinobacteria phylum, Tenericutes phylum, and Lactobacillus reuteri species in both the colon and lungs. Colonic Microbiota Transplantation (CMT) from SEB-injected mice that were treated with RES as well as the transfer of L. reuteri into recipient mice inhibited the production of SEB-mediated induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-17 but increased that of anti-inflammatory IL-10. Additionally, such CMT and L. reuteri recipient mice exposed to SEB, showed a decrease in lung-infiltrating mononuclear cells, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, NKT cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cells, but an increase in the population of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and Th3 cells, and increase in the survival of mice from SEB-mediated ARDS. Together, the current study demonstrates that ARDS induced by SEB triggers dysbiosis in the lungs and gut and that attenuation of ARDS by RES may be mediated, at least in part, by alterations in microbiota in the lungs and the gut, especially through the induction of beneficial bacteria such as L. reuteri.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Colon/drug effects , Enterotoxins , Fecal Microbiota Transplantation , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/drug effects , Lung/drug effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , Resveratrol/pharmacology , Superantigens , Animals , Cell Line , Colon/immunology , Colon/metabolism , Colon/microbiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Dysbiosis , Female , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Lactobacillus reuteri/drug effects , Lactobacillus reuteri/growth & development , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/microbiology , Mice, Inbred C3H , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/microbiology
4.
EMBO Mol Med ; 13(4): e13191, 2021 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068062

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the agent that causes COVID-19, invades epithelial cells, including those of the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa, using angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) as a receptor. Subsequent inflammation can promote rapid virus clearance, but severe cases of COVID-19 are characterized by an inefficient immune response that fails to clear the infection. Using primary epithelial organoids from human colon, we explored how the central antiviral mediator IFN-γ, which is elevated in COVID-19, affects epithelial cell differentiation, ACE2 expression, and susceptibility to infection with SARS-CoV-2. In mouse and human colon, ACE2 is mainly expressed by surface enterocytes. Inducing enterocyte differentiation in organoid culture resulted in increased ACE2 production. IFN-γ treatment promoted differentiation into mature KRT20+ enterocytes expressing high levels of ACE2, increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and resulted in enhanced virus production in infected cells. Similarly, infection-induced epithelial interferon signaling promoted enterocyte maturation and enhanced ACE2 expression. We here reveal a mechanism by which IFN-γ-driven inflammatory responses induce a vulnerable epithelial state with robust replication of SARS-CoV-2, which may have an impact on disease outcome and virus transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Models, Immunological , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Differentiation/immunology , Colon/immunology , Colon/pathology , Colon/virology , Disease Susceptibility , Enterocytes/metabolism , Enterocytes/pathology , Enterocytes/virology , Gene Expression , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Interferon-gamma/administration & dosage , Intestinal Mucosa/immunology , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Mice , Organoids/immunology , Organoids/pathology , Organoids/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Replication/immunology
5.
Life Sci ; 264: 118450, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885374

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a widely used antimalarial drug, is proposed to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, no report is currently available regarding the direct effects of HCQ on gut microbiota, which is associated with the outcomes of elderly patients with COVID-19. Here, we first investigated the effects of HCQ on intestinal microecology in mice. MAIN METHODS: Fifteen female C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two groups: HCQ group (n = 10) and control group (n = 5). Mice in the HCQ group were administered with HCQ at dose of 100 mg/kg by gavage daily for 14 days. The feces of mice were collected before and on the 7th and 14th days after HCQ challenge, and then analyzed by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. At the end of the experiment, the hematology, serum biochemistry and cytokines were determined, respectively. The mRNA expression of tight junction proteins in colonic tissues were also studied by RT-PCR. KEY FINDINGS: HCQ challenge had no effects on the counts of white blood cells, the levels of serum cytokines, and the gene expression of tight junction proteins in colon. HCQ also did not increase the content of serum d-lactate in mice. Notably, HCQ significantly decreased the diversity of gut microbiota, increased the relative abundance of phylum Bacteroidetes whereas decreased that of Firmicutes. SIGNIFICANCE: Short-term high dose HCQ challenge changes gut microbiota but not the intestinal integrity and immunological responses in mice. Special attention should be paid to the effects of HCQ on intestinal microecology in future clinical use.


Subject(s)
Colon/drug effects , Colon/immunology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/drug effects , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Administration, Oral , Animals , Colon/metabolism , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Feces/microbiology , Female , Lactic Acid/blood , Mice , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Tight Junction Proteins/biosynthesis
6.
J Crohns Colitis ; 15(3): 485-498, 2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-756892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] are considered immunosuppressed, but do not seem more vulnerable for COVID-19. Nevertheless, intestinal inflammation has shown to be an important risk factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection and prognosis. Therefore, we investigated the role of intestinal inflammation on the viral intestinal entry mechanisms, including ACE2, in IBD. METHODS: We collected inflamed and uninflamed mucosal biopsies from Crohn's disease [CD] [n = 193] and ulcerative colitis [UC] [n = 158] patients, and from 51 matched non-IBD controls for RNA sequencing, differential gene expression, and co-expression analysis. Organoids from UC patients were subjected to an inflammatory mix and processed for RNA sequencing. Transmural ileal biopsies were processed for single-cell [sc] sequencing. Publicly available colonic sc-RNA sequencing data, and microarrays from tissue pre/post anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] therapy, were analysed. RESULTS: In inflamed CD ileum, ACE2 was significantly decreased compared with control ileum [p = 4.6E-07], whereas colonic ACE2 was higher in inflamed colon of CD/UC compared with control [p = 8.3E-03; p = 1.9E-03]. Sc-RNA sequencing confirmed this ACE2 dysregulation and exclusive epithelial ACE2 expression. Network analyses highlighted HNF4A as key regulator of ileal ACE2, and pro-inflammatory cytokines and interferon regulating factors regulated colonic ACE2. Inflammatory stimuli upregulated ACE2 in UC organoids [p = 1.7E-02], but not in non-IBD controls [p = 9.1E-01]. Anti-TNF therapy restored colonic ACE2 regulation in responders. CONCLUSIONS: Intestinal inflammation alters SARS-CoV-2 coreceptors in the intestine, with opposing dysregulations in ileum and colon. HNF4A, an IBD susceptibility gene, seems an important upstream regulator of ACE2 in ileum, whereas interferon signalling might dominate in colon.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , COVID-19 , Colitis, Ulcerative , Colon , Crohn Disease , Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 , Ileum , Interferons/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Biopsy/methods , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Colitis, Ulcerative/immunology , Colitis, Ulcerative/pathology , Colitis, Ulcerative/virology , Colon/immunology , Colon/pathology , Colon/virology , Crohn Disease/immunology , Crohn Disease/pathology , Crohn Disease/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4/genetics , Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4/immunology , Humans , Ileum/immunology , Ileum/pathology , Ileum/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Signal Transduction , Single-Cell Analysis
7.
Cell Rep ; 32(1): 107863, 2020 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-610468

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an unprecedented worldwide health problem that requires concerted and global approaches to stop the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Although SARS-CoV-2 primarily targets lung epithelium cells, there is growing evidence that the intestinal epithelium is also infected. Here, using both colon-derived cell lines and primary non-transformed colon organoids, we engage in the first comprehensive analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 life cycle in human intestinal epithelial cells (hIECs). Our results demonstrate that hIECs fully support SARS-CoV-2 infection, replication, and production of infectious de novo virus particles. We found that viral infection elicits an extremely robust intrinsic immune response where interferon-mediated responses are efficient at controlling SARS-CoV-2 replication and de novo virus production. Taken together, our data demonstrate that hIECs are a productive site of SARS-CoV-2 replication and suggest that the enteric phase of SARS-CoV-2 may participate in the pathologies observed in COVID-19 patients by contributing to increasing patient viremia and fueling an exacerbated cytokine response.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Colon/virology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Interferons/immunology , Intestinal Mucosa/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Caco-2 Cells , Cell Line, Tumor , Colon/cytology , Colon/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/blood , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/cytology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Virus Replication/immunology
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