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2.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e059940, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788968

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We sought to investigate if duplicate faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) sampling improves the negative and positive predictive value of patients thought to be at risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Specifically, we aimed to investigate whether the proportion of FIT-negative CRC missed by a single FIT test in symptomatic patients could be reduced by duplicate FIT testing. DESIGN: A retrospective service evaluation cohort study of the diagnostic accuracy of duplicate FIT testing. SETTING: Patients referred from primary care with suspected CRC to four secondary care trusts in North-West England. PARTICIPANTS: 28 622 patients over 18-years-old with lower gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of CRC who completed two FIT samples. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The performance of duplicate FIT for detecting CRC at a threshold of 10 µgHb/g. RESULTS: The sensitivity if either test was >10 µgHb/g was 0.978 (0.955-0.989), specificity was 0.662 (0.657-0.668), positive predictive value 0.031 (0.028-0.035) and negative predictive value 1.00 (0.999-1.00). Despite two-thirds of patients (18952) being negative following two tests, at this threshold only seven CRC were missed over a 26-month period. All seven patients had other high-risk features which should have prompted investigation. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that in routine NHS practice, a duplicate FIT sample strategy together with clinical evaluation for evidence of anaemia and weight loss is superior to a single FIT sample alone and would allow symptomatic patients to be managed in primary care without the need for urgent referral to secondary care for urgent colonic imaging.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Adolescent , Cohort Studies , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , England , Feces/chemistry , Hemoglobins/analysis , Humans , Occult Blood , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity
3.
Gut ; 71(5): 950-960, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784858

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Implementation of faecal immunochemical tests (FIT) as a triage test in primary healthcare may improve the efficiency of referrals without missing cases of colorectal cancer (CRC). We aim to summarise the performance characteristics of FITs for CRC in symptomatic patients presenting to primary healthcare. DESIGN: We performed a systematic literature review of Medline and EMBASE databases from May 2018 to November 2020. Previous related systematic searches were also adapted to this aim and completed with reference screening. We identified studies performed on adult patients consulting for abdominal symptoms in primary care which reported data such that the FIT diagnostic performance parameters for CRC could be obtained. Bivariate models were used to synthesise available evidence. Meta-regression analysis was performed to evaluate the causes of heterogeneity. RESULTS: Twenty-three studies (69 536 participants) were included (CRC prevalence 0.3%-6.2%). Six studies (n=34 691) assessed FIT as rule in test (threshold of ≥150 µg Hb/g faeces) showing a sensitivity of 64.1% (95% CI 57.8% to 69.9%) and a specificity of 95.0% (95% CI 91.2% to 97.2%). A threshold of 10 µg/g (15 studies; n=48 872) resulted in a sensitivity of 87.2% (95% CI 81.0% to 91.6%) and a specificity of 84.4% (95% CI 79.4% to 88.3%) for CRC. At a 20 µg Hb/g faeces threshold (five studies; n=24 187) less than one additional CRC would be missed per 1000 patients investigated compared with 10 µg Hb/g faeces threshold (CRC prevalence 2%). CONCLUSION: FIT is the test of choice to evaluate patients with new-onset lower gastrointestinal symptoms in primary healthcare.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Adult , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Feces/chemistry , Hemoglobins/analysis , Humans , Occult Blood , Primary Health Care/methods , Sensitivity and Specificity
4.
Cancer Sci ; 113(4): 1531-1534, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779205

ABSTRACT

According to the current international guidelines, high-risk patients diagnosed with pathological T1 (pT1) colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent complete local resection but may have risk of developing lymph node metastasis (LNM) are recommended additional intestinal resection with lymph node dissection. However, around 90% of the patients without LNM are exposed to the risk of being overtreated due to the insufficient pathological criteria for risk stratification of LNM. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a noninvasive biomarker for molecular residual disease and relapse detection after treatments including surgical and endoscopic resection of solid tumors. The CIRCULATE-Japan project includes a large-scale patient-screening registry of the GALAXY study to track ctDNA status of patients with stage II to IV or recurrent CRC that can be completely resected. Based on the CIRCULATE-Japan platform, we launched DENEB, a new prospective study, within the GALAXY study for patients with pT1 CRC who underwent complete local resection and were scheduled for additional intestinal resection with lymph node dissection based on the standard pathologic risk stratification criteria for LNM. The aim of this study is to explore the ability of predicting LNM using ctDNA analysis compared with the standard pathological criteria. The ctDNA assay will build new evidence to establish a noninvasive personalized diagnosis in patients, which will facilitate tailored/optimal treatment strategies for CRC patients.


Subject(s)
Circulating Tumor DNA , Colorectal Neoplasms , Circulating Tumor DNA/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Liquid Biopsy , Lymph Node Excision , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymphatic Metastasis/pathology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
5.
Chirurgia (Bucur) ; 117(1): 45-54, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1743108

ABSTRACT

Background: The novel coronavirus, SARS-COV-2, was first reported in Wuhan, China in the end of 2019. To curb its spread, social distancing measures and new safety regulations were implemented which led to major disruptions in colorectal cancer care. It is however unknown how it influenced the Romanian colorectal cancer care. Methods and Material: We assessed the demographical, clinical, intraoperative and pathological data of our colorectal cancer patients, 302 in total, between 15.03.2019-14.03.2021. The first year's data was considered as the control group and the second one, the study (pandemic) group. Results: We observed a 12% decrease in colorectal cancer hospitalizations in the first year, 38,6% in the first six months. The rate of emergency admissions, colo/ileostomy formatting procedures, palliative resections, clinical metastasis was higher in the pandemic group. More advanced locoregional invasion, a higher tumor stage, higher rate of vascular, perineural invasion, positive resection margin, and a higher lymph node yield was seen after the restrictions were implemented. Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic and the response against it had a major effect on the colorectal cancer care in our country. The outcomes of these worse clinical and pathological findings are unknown, but it is important to do further research in this field. We think colorectal cancer care should have an absolute priority in future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Lymphatic Metastasis , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Romania/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
6.
Int J Colorectal Dis ; 37(4): 849-854, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739312

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second-leading cause of death in the USA. CRC screening remains underutilized, especially in underinsured populations. Screening has been heavily disrupted during the COVID-19 pandemic. PURPOSE: The goal is to explore the impact of the pandemic on ethnic and gender disparities in CRC screening. METHODS: Patients were identified 1 year before and after COVID-19 precautions began, using March 1, 2020, as the inflection point. The primary inclusion criterion was an ordered colonoscopy. The outcome of interest was a colonoscopy performed. Differences by year and race were assessed using chi-square analysis. A cohort of 1549 patients (899 in pre-COVID; 650 in post-COVID) between age 45 and 75 for whom a colonoscopy was ordered was selected from EHR at a large institution. RESULTS: There was a 51% reduction in screening colonoscopies performed. White patients had a decrease of 49%, and African Americans had a 55% reduction. Stool testing increased from 47% prior to the pandemic to 94% during the pandemic representing a greater than 100% increase in stool testing uptake. CONCLUSION: The true impact of COVID-19 on colorectal cancer is yet to be uncovered as future mortality estimates from CRC are ongoing. Due to the widespread closure of endoscopy centers and delay in screening, we believe that the pandemic worsened the screening disparities most prevalent among minority populations. Our study points to the drastic reduction of screening for all races, especially for African Americans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colonic Neoplasms , Colorectal Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Colonic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colonic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736927

ABSTRACT

Disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality among White, Black, and American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) men are attributable to differences in early detection screening. Determining how masculinity barriers influence CRC screening completion is critical for cancer prevention and control. To determine whether masculinity barriers to medical care are associated with lower rates of ever completing CRC screening, a survey-based study was employed from December 2020-January 2021 among 435 White, Black, and AIAN men (aged 45-75) who resided in the US. Logistic regression models were fit to four Masculinity Barriers to Medical Care subscales predicting ever completing CRC screening. For all men, being strong was associated with 54% decreased odds of CRC screening completion (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.94); each unit increase in negative attitudes toward medical professionals and exams decreased the odds of ever completing CRC screening by 57% (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.86). Black men who scored higher on negativity toward medical professionals and exams had decreased odds of ever screening. Consideration of masculinity in future population-based and intervention research is critical for increasing men's participation in CRC screening, with more salience for Black men.


Subject(s)
Alaskan Natives , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Male , Masculinity , Mass Screening , Men
8.
Br J Gen Pract ; 72(714): 32, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732294
9.
Curr Oncol ; 29(3): 1723-1743, 2022 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731961

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: The COVID-19 pandemic illuminated vulnerabilities in the Canadian health care system and exposed gaps and challenges across the cancer care continuum. Canada is experiencing significant disruptions to cancer-related services, and the impact these disruptions (delays/deferrals/cancellations) have on the health care system and patients are yet to be determined. Given the potential adverse ramifications, how can Canada's health care systems build resilience for future threats? (2) Methods: To answer this question, CCC facilitated a series of four thought-leadership roundtables, each representing the views of four different stakeholder groups: patients, physicians, health care system leaders, and researchers. (3) Results: Six themes of strength were identified to serve as a springboard for building resilience including, (1) advancing virtual care and digital health technologies to prevent future interruptions in cancer care delivery. (2) developing real-time data metrics, data sharing, and evidence-based decision-making. (3) enhancing public-private-non-profit partnerships to advance research and strengthen connections across the system. (4) advancing patient-centricity in cancer research to drive and encourage precision medicine approaches to care. (5) investing in training and hiring a robust supply of health care human resources. (6) implementing a national strategy and infrastructure to ensure inter-provincial collaborative data sharing (4). Conclusions: A resilient health care system that can respond to shocks and threats is not an emergency system; it is a robust everyday system that can respond to emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics
10.
Eur J Cancer ; 161: 38-43, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719652

ABSTRACT

Many countries had to suspend their colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. This eventually may lead to postponed diagnoses of premalignant lesions and CRC, resulting in increased incidence or more advanced CRCs rates. This study aimed to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on incidence and stage distribution of CRCs in the Netherlands, by monitoring CRC diagnoses and stage distribution in the months before, during and after the first COVID-19 wave. Data on incidence and stage distribution of CRCs of individuals aged 55-75 years in 25 hospitals in the Netherlands were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. The observed incidence after the suspension (March 2020-December 2020) was compared to the expected incidence in the same period. In the period April to June 2020, we observed the largest decrease in the total incidence of CRC. We found that 48% of the decrease was due to stage I, 23% due to stage II, 23% due to stage III and 5% due to stage IV. After gradually resuming screening mid May 2020, we observed an increase in CRC diagnoses from July 2020 onwards. As of October 2020, the observed number of diagnoses was higher than the expected number. As the decrease was mainly limited to stage I CRCs, it seems that the temporary suspension of the CRC screening programme due to the COVID-19 pandemic will have a minimal long-term impact on stage distribution and CRC mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Aged , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Netherlands , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 22(1): 68, 2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690968

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Skin metastases from colorectal adenocarcinoma are rare conditions that are metachronous in most of cases and may represent the first sign of a recurrence. These lesions are usually located to the abdominal wall on postoperative scars, perineum and chest due to direct spread from the tumor or to the lymphatic and venous dissemination. We describe a rare case of synchronous skin metastases in a patient affected by sigmoid adenocarcinoma with no sign of liver and lung repetitive lesions. CASE PRESENTATION: We admitted a 59 years old male, with no relevant medical history. He was evaluated by our tertiary center of colorectal surgery complaining diarrhoea and abdominal pain. The physical examination revealed a palpable mass in left flank of the abdomen. The colonoscopy showed a sub-stenosis of the sigmoid colon (G2 adenocarcinoma). No repetitive lesions were detected by the preoperative CT scan. The patient reported a rapid grow of a soft supralabial and chin nodules in the last 2 months, which he believed to be related to the use of the mask due to COVID-19 pandemic. A laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with complete mesocolic excision and a local excision of both facial nodules were performed. The histological examination revealed a poorly differentiated signet ring cell colorectal adenocarcinoma with metastases in seven pericolic lymphonodes. The excisional biopsy of the skin nodules revealed a subcutaneous metastases from primary colorectal tumour. CONCLUSIONS: As far as we know, synchronous facial metastases from colorectal cancer in the absence of any other metastases has never been described before. The onset of new skin nodules in patients affected by colorectal cancer should raise-up the clinical suspicion of metastatic lesions even when repetitive lesions are not detected in the liver or lungs.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Adenocarcinoma/pathology , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
BJS Open ; 6(1)2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study compared patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery in 20 hospitals of northern Italy in 2019 versus 2020, in order to evaluate whether COVID-19-related delays of colorectal cancer screening resulted in more advanced cancers at diagnosis and worse clinical outcomes. METHOD: This was a retrospective multicentre cohort analysis of patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery in March to December 2019 versus March to December 2020. Independent predictors of disease stage (oncological stage, associated symptoms, clinical T4 stage, metastasis) and outcome (surgical complications, palliative surgery, 30-day death) were evaluated using logistic regression. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 1755 patients operated in 2019, and 1481 in 2020 (both mean age 69.6 years). The proportion of cancers with symptoms, clinical T4 stage, liver and lung metastases in 2019 and 2020 were respectively: 80.8 versus 84.5 per cent; 6.2 versus 8.7 per cent; 10.2 versus 10.3 per cent; and 3.0 versus 4.4 per cent. The proportions of surgical complications, palliative surgery and death in 2019 and 2020 were, respectively: 34.4 versus 31.9 per cent; 5.0 versus 7.5 per cent; and 1.7 versus 2.4 per cent. Cancers in 2020 (versus 2019) were more likely to be symptomatic (odds ratio 1.36 (95 per cent c.i. 1.09 to 1.69)), clinical T4 stage (odds ratio 1.38 (95 per cent c.i. 1.03 to 1.85)) and have multiple liver metastases (odds ratio 2.21 (95 per cent c.i. 1.24 to 3.94)), but were not more likely to be associated with surgical complications (odds ratio 0.79 (95 per cent c.i. 0.68 to 0.93)). CONCLUSION: Colorectal cancer patients who had surgery between March and December 2020 had an increased risk of advanced disease in terms of associated symptoms, cancer location, clinical T4 stage and number of liver metastases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Aged , Cohort Studies , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(2)2022 Feb 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673377

ABSTRACT

Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent used in a variety of malignancies such as colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. It is a platinum derivative that results in direct cell cytotoxicity with resultant cell death. The most common side effects often noted are neurotoxicity, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, hepatotoxicity and myelosuppression. Oxaliplatin induced digital ischaemia and necrosis is a rare side effect that was observed in our patient. In general, digital ischaemia is a rare vascular disorder that is often associated with autoimmune disease. A patient with digital ischaemia due to oxaliplatin will be described in this case report.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , Colorectal Neoplasms , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Humans , Ischemia/chemically induced , Necrosis/chemically induced , Organoplatinum Compounds/adverse effects , Oxaliplatin/adverse effects
17.
Langenbecks Arch Surg ; 407(2): 739-745, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653476

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic and resultant lockdown measures potentially delay management of non-communicable, life-limiting diseases like colorectal cancer (CRC) through avoidance of healthcare facilities by the public and diversion of resources within healthcare systems. This study aims to evaluate the impact of Singapore's "Circuit Breaker (CB)" lockdown measures on CRC disease presentation and short-term surgical outcomes, while comparing Singapore's approach against other countries which employed similar lockdown measures. METHODS: Patients whose initial diagnosis of CRC was made within the 6-month pre-CB (6/10/19-6/4/20) ("pre-CB group") and post-CB (7/4/20-7/10/20) ("post-CB group") period were enrolled retrospectively. The groups were compared based on severity of disease on presentation and short-term operative outcomes. RESULTS: In total, 105 patients diagnosed with CRC were enrolled in this study. When comparing pre-CB and post-CB groups, there was no significant difference in stage of CRC on presentation (p = 0.850). There was also no increase in need for emergent operations (p = 0.367). For patients who had undergone an operation, postoperative morbidity was not significantly higher in the post-CB group (p = 0.201). Both groups of patients had similar length of stay in the hospital (p = 0.438). CONCLUSION: Unlike similar high-income countries, Singapore did not see later stage disease on presentation and poorer operative outcomes after lockdown measures. Possible reasons include lesser healthcare avoidance behaviours amongst Singaporeans, and adequate preparation of resources and contingency plans formed by hospitals after previous pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Communicable Disease Control , Delayed Diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(2)2022 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638437

ABSTRACT

In Virginia, 56% of colorectal cancers (CRC) are diagnosed late, making it one of three enduring CRC mortality hotspots in the US. Cervical cancer (CCa) exhibits a similar pattern, with 48% late-stage diagnosis. Mortality for these cancers is worse for non-Latinx/e(nL)-Black people relative to nL-White people in Virginia, but preventable with equitable screening access and timely diagnostic follow-up. However, structural barriers, such as fractured referral systems and extended time between medical visits, remain. Because Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) care for a large proportion of racial and ethnic minorities, and underserved communities, regardless of ability to pay, they are ideal partners to tackle structural barriers to cancer screenings. We piloted a quality improvement initiative at five FQHCs in southcentral Virginia to identify and address structural, race-related barriers to CRC, as well as CCa screening and diagnostic follow-up using evidence-based approaches. Uniquely, FQHCs were paired with local community organizations in a didactic partnership, to elevate the community's voice while together, increase support, acceptance, uptake, and intervention sustainability. We report on project development, and share preliminary data within the context of project goals, namely, to increase cancer screenings by 5-10%, improve knowledge and diagnostic follow-up processes, and build longitudinal partnerships.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/prevention & control , Humans , Mass Screening , Quality Improvement , Referral and Consultation
19.
BMJ Open Gastroenterol ; 9(1)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630258

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe a conceptual framework that provides understanding of the challenges encountered and the adaptive approaches taken by organised colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programmes during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: This was a qualitative case study of international CRC screening programmes. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with programme managers/leaders and programme experts, researchers and clinical leaders of large, population-based screening programmes. Data analysis, using elements of grounded theory, as well as cross-cases analysis was conducted by two experienced qualitative researchers. RESULTS: 19 participants were interviewed from seven programmes in North America, Europe and Australasia. A conceptual framework ('Nimble Approach') was the key outcome of the analysis. Four concepts constitute this approach to managing CRC screening programmes during COVID-19: Fast (meeting the need to make decisions and communicate quickly), Adapting (flexibly and creatively managing testing/colonoscopy capacity, access and backlogs), Calculating (modelling and actively monitoring programmes to inform decision-making and support programme quality) and Ethically Mindful (considering ethical conundrums emerging from programme responses). Highly integrated programmes, those with highly integrated communication networks, and that managed greater portions of the screening process seemed best positioned to respond to the crisis. CONCLUSIONS: The Nimble Approach has potentially broad applications; it can be deployed to effectively respond to programme-specific challenges or manage CRC programmes during future pandemics, other health crises or emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Surg Endosc ; 36(1): 321-327, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) remains demanding due to technical difficulties and high risk of perforation. Most of the reported traction methods are initiated after creating a mucosal flap, which is time consuming. To obtain a good visualization at the mucosal incision stage, we developed the early clip-with-line (ECL) method. This method was started immediately after injection of sodium hyaluronate solution into the submucosal layer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and the safety of the ECL method for colorectal ESD. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed all cases of colorectal ESDs (41 cases in total) performed from January 2017 to February 2019 in our institution. From January 2017 to August 2018, 27 of these cases were performed using conventional (non-ECL) ESDs, while from September 2018 onwards, the remaining 14 cases were performed using the ECL method. Retrospective comparison between the ECL group and the non-ECL group was conducted in terms of clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and adverse events. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between two groups. Procedure time (median [range]) was significantly shorter in the ECL group than in the non-ECL group (66 [29-131] min vs 90 [30-410] min; P = 0.03). As for adverse events, no case of perforation occurred in the ECL group, whereas perforation was observed in 7.4% (2/27) cases in the non-ECL group (no significant difference). CONCLUSION: Early clip-with-line method for colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection reduced procedure time.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Endoscopic Mucosal Resection , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Endoscopic Mucosal Resection/methods , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Surgical Instruments , Traction/methods , Treatment Outcome
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