Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 61
Filter
2.
Cancer Sci ; 113(4): 1531-1534, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779205

ABSTRACT

According to the current international guidelines, high-risk patients diagnosed with pathological T1 (pT1) colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent complete local resection but may have risk of developing lymph node metastasis (LNM) are recommended additional intestinal resection with lymph node dissection. However, around 90% of the patients without LNM are exposed to the risk of being overtreated due to the insufficient pathological criteria for risk stratification of LNM. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a noninvasive biomarker for molecular residual disease and relapse detection after treatments including surgical and endoscopic resection of solid tumors. The CIRCULATE-Japan project includes a large-scale patient-screening registry of the GALAXY study to track ctDNA status of patients with stage II to IV or recurrent CRC that can be completely resected. Based on the CIRCULATE-Japan platform, we launched DENEB, a new prospective study, within the GALAXY study for patients with pT1 CRC who underwent complete local resection and were scheduled for additional intestinal resection with lymph node dissection based on the standard pathologic risk stratification criteria for LNM. The aim of this study is to explore the ability of predicting LNM using ctDNA analysis compared with the standard pathological criteria. The ctDNA assay will build new evidence to establish a noninvasive personalized diagnosis in patients, which will facilitate tailored/optimal treatment strategies for CRC patients.


Subject(s)
Circulating Tumor DNA , Colorectal Neoplasms , Circulating Tumor DNA/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Liquid Biopsy , Lymph Node Excision , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymphatic Metastasis/pathology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
3.
Chirurgia (Bucur) ; 117(1): 45-54, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1743108

ABSTRACT

Background: The novel coronavirus, SARS-COV-2, was first reported in Wuhan, China in the end of 2019. To curb its spread, social distancing measures and new safety regulations were implemented which led to major disruptions in colorectal cancer care. It is however unknown how it influenced the Romanian colorectal cancer care. Methods and Material: We assessed the demographical, clinical, intraoperative and pathological data of our colorectal cancer patients, 302 in total, between 15.03.2019-14.03.2021. The first year's data was considered as the control group and the second one, the study (pandemic) group. Results: We observed a 12% decrease in colorectal cancer hospitalizations in the first year, 38,6% in the first six months. The rate of emergency admissions, colo/ileostomy formatting procedures, palliative resections, clinical metastasis was higher in the pandemic group. More advanced locoregional invasion, a higher tumor stage, higher rate of vascular, perineural invasion, positive resection margin, and a higher lymph node yield was seen after the restrictions were implemented. Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic and the response against it had a major effect on the colorectal cancer care in our country. The outcomes of these worse clinical and pathological findings are unknown, but it is important to do further research in this field. We think colorectal cancer care should have an absolute priority in future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Lymphatic Metastasis , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Romania/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
4.
BJS Open ; 6(1)2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study compared patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery in 20 hospitals of northern Italy in 2019 versus 2020, in order to evaluate whether COVID-19-related delays of colorectal cancer screening resulted in more advanced cancers at diagnosis and worse clinical outcomes. METHOD: This was a retrospective multicentre cohort analysis of patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery in March to December 2019 versus March to December 2020. Independent predictors of disease stage (oncological stage, associated symptoms, clinical T4 stage, metastasis) and outcome (surgical complications, palliative surgery, 30-day death) were evaluated using logistic regression. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 1755 patients operated in 2019, and 1481 in 2020 (both mean age 69.6 years). The proportion of cancers with symptoms, clinical T4 stage, liver and lung metastases in 2019 and 2020 were respectively: 80.8 versus 84.5 per cent; 6.2 versus 8.7 per cent; 10.2 versus 10.3 per cent; and 3.0 versus 4.4 per cent. The proportions of surgical complications, palliative surgery and death in 2019 and 2020 were, respectively: 34.4 versus 31.9 per cent; 5.0 versus 7.5 per cent; and 1.7 versus 2.4 per cent. Cancers in 2020 (versus 2019) were more likely to be symptomatic (odds ratio 1.36 (95 per cent c.i. 1.09 to 1.69)), clinical T4 stage (odds ratio 1.38 (95 per cent c.i. 1.03 to 1.85)) and have multiple liver metastases (odds ratio 2.21 (95 per cent c.i. 1.24 to 3.94)), but were not more likely to be associated with surgical complications (odds ratio 0.79 (95 per cent c.i. 0.68 to 0.93)). CONCLUSION: Colorectal cancer patients who had surgery between March and December 2020 had an increased risk of advanced disease in terms of associated symptoms, cancer location, clinical T4 stage and number of liver metastases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Aged , Cohort Studies , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Langenbecks Arch Surg ; 407(2): 739-745, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653476

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic and resultant lockdown measures potentially delay management of non-communicable, life-limiting diseases like colorectal cancer (CRC) through avoidance of healthcare facilities by the public and diversion of resources within healthcare systems. This study aims to evaluate the impact of Singapore's "Circuit Breaker (CB)" lockdown measures on CRC disease presentation and short-term surgical outcomes, while comparing Singapore's approach against other countries which employed similar lockdown measures. METHODS: Patients whose initial diagnosis of CRC was made within the 6-month pre-CB (6/10/19-6/4/20) ("pre-CB group") and post-CB (7/4/20-7/10/20) ("post-CB group") period were enrolled retrospectively. The groups were compared based on severity of disease on presentation and short-term operative outcomes. RESULTS: In total, 105 patients diagnosed with CRC were enrolled in this study. When comparing pre-CB and post-CB groups, there was no significant difference in stage of CRC on presentation (p = 0.850). There was also no increase in need for emergent operations (p = 0.367). For patients who had undergone an operation, postoperative morbidity was not significantly higher in the post-CB group (p = 0.201). Both groups of patients had similar length of stay in the hospital (p = 0.438). CONCLUSION: Unlike similar high-income countries, Singapore did not see later stage disease on presentation and poorer operative outcomes after lockdown measures. Possible reasons include lesser healthcare avoidance behaviours amongst Singaporeans, and adequate preparation of resources and contingency plans formed by hospitals after previous pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Communicable Disease Control , Delayed Diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
6.
Surg Endosc ; 36(1): 321-327, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) remains demanding due to technical difficulties and high risk of perforation. Most of the reported traction methods are initiated after creating a mucosal flap, which is time consuming. To obtain a good visualization at the mucosal incision stage, we developed the early clip-with-line (ECL) method. This method was started immediately after injection of sodium hyaluronate solution into the submucosal layer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and the safety of the ECL method for colorectal ESD. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed all cases of colorectal ESDs (41 cases in total) performed from January 2017 to February 2019 in our institution. From January 2017 to August 2018, 27 of these cases were performed using conventional (non-ECL) ESDs, while from September 2018 onwards, the remaining 14 cases were performed using the ECL method. Retrospective comparison between the ECL group and the non-ECL group was conducted in terms of clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and adverse events. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between two groups. Procedure time (median [range]) was significantly shorter in the ECL group than in the non-ECL group (66 [29-131] min vs 90 [30-410] min; P = 0.03). As for adverse events, no case of perforation occurred in the ECL group, whereas perforation was observed in 7.4% (2/27) cases in the non-ECL group (no significant difference). CONCLUSION: Early clip-with-line method for colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection reduced procedure time.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Endoscopic Mucosal Resection , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Endoscopic Mucosal Resection/methods , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Surgical Instruments , Traction/methods , Treatment Outcome
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(12): e31917, 2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598416

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Elective colorectal cancer (CRC) surgeries offer enhanced surgical outcomes but demand high self-efficacy in prehabilitation and competency in self-care and disease management postsurgery. Conventional strategies to meet perioperative needs have not been pragmatic, and there remains a pressing need for novel technologies that could improve health outcomes. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to describe the development of a smartphone-based interactive CRC self-management enhancement psychosocial program (iCanManage) in order to improve health outcomes among patients who undergo elective CRC surgeries and their family caregivers. METHODS: A multidisciplinary international team comprising physicians, specialist nurses, a psychologist, software engineers, academic researchers, cancer survivors, patient ambassadors, and ostomy care medical equipment suppliers was formed to facilitate the development of this patient-centric digital solution. The process occurred in several stages: (1) review of current practice through clinic visits and on-site observations; (2) review of literature and findings from preliminary studies; (3) content development grounded in an underpinning theory; (4) integration of support services; and (5) optimizing user experience through improving interface aesthetics and customization. In our study, 5 participants with CRC performed preliminary assessments on the quality of the developed solution using the 20-item user version of the Mobile App Rating Scale (uMARS), which had good psychometric properties. RESULTS: Based on the collected uMARS data, the smartphone app was rated highly for functionality, aesthetics, information quality, and perceived impact, and moderately for engagement and subjective quality. Several limiting factors such as poor agility in the adoption of digital technology and low eHealth literacy were identified despite efforts to promote engagement and ensure ease of use of the mobile app. To overcome such barriers, additional app-training sessions, an instruction manual, and regular telephone calls will be incorporated into the iCanManage program during the trial period. CONCLUSIONS: This form of multidisciplinary collaboration is advantageous as it can potentially streamline existing care paths and allow the delivery of more holistic care to the CRC population during the perioperative period. Should the program be found to be effective and sustainable, hospitals adopting this digital solution may achieve better resource allocation and reduce overall health care costs in the long run. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04159363; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04159363.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Interdisciplinary Studies , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Patient-Centered Care
8.
Cir Cir ; 89(6): 755-762, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547928

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim is to analyze the usefulness of pre-operative COVID-19 screening to detect asymptomatic patients, the capability of our patient selection algorithm to detect patients with more advanced tumors and the results of colorectal cancer surgery managed with a multimodal approach. We propose the use of a preoperative patient selection algorithm to prioritize the surgical treatment of patients with worse oncological prognosis and lower perioperative risk in situations of health system saturation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective descriptive study including 71 patients operated on for colorectal cancer during COVID-19's high incidence period. A division was made into two periods of time that were later compared with the aim of assessing whether the scale used identified those patients with lower surgical risk and higher oncological priority for their priority scheduling. RESULTS: Post-operative severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection occurred in one patient (1.4%). Pre-operative polymerase chain reaction detected one asymptomatic patient (3%). Tumor stage was ≥ IIIA in 39% and node positive in 39% of patients in the first period, while 26% and 21% in the second period, respectively (p = 0.320; p = 0.179), without increasing the surgical stay or complications. Median hospital stay was 5 days. Grades III and IV morbidity were 4.4% and 1.4%. CONCLUSION: The use of an algorithm and Patient Selection Scale can detect patients with more advanced tumors to be operated before. Multimodal management/ERAS have a role in achieving short stay and low morbidity.


OBJETIVO: El retraso terapéutico derivado de la saturación del Sistema sanitario conlleva un peor pronóstico oncológico y un aumento de complicaciones en el cáncer colorrectal. Proponemos el usode un algoritmo de selección de pacientes de forma preoperatoria para priorizar el tratamiento quirúrgico de los pacientes con peor pronóstico oncológico y menor riesgo perioperatorio. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Realizamos un estudio descriptivo prospectivo de 71 pacientes intervenidos por cáncer colorrectal durante el periodo de máxima incidencia por COVID. Se realizó una división en dos periodos de tiempo que fueron comparados posteriormente con el objetivo de valorar si la escala utilizada conseguía identificar aquellos pacientes con menor riesgo quirúrgico y mayor prioridad oncológica para su programación prioritaria. RESULTADOS: Utilizando la escala de priorización de pacientes (PSS) observamos que el estadio tumoral fue mayor de IIIA en un 39% de los pacientes con un 39% de ganglios positivos en un primer periodo, frente a un 26% y 21% en un segundo periodo (p = 0.320; p = 0.179) de tiempo, sin aumentar la estancia operatoria ni las complicaciones. Se realizaron dos métodos de cribado de COVID-19 en dos periodos de tiempo, detectando un 3% de pacientes asintomáticos de forma preoperatoria con PCR, y documentando un 1.4% de infección por COVID postoperatoria. CONCLUSIONES: Ante la saturación del sistema sanitario, la utilización de protocolos y algoritmos para selección de pacientes con cáncer colorrectal puede ayudar a dar preferencia quirúrgica a aquellos casos que no deben ser demorados.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Patient Selection , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 104(4): 261-268, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542159

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges to colorectal cancer (CRC) care. Many organisations opted to perform CRC resections in 'cold' sites. Infrastructure in Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust (NHCT) necessitated co-locating CRC care with 'hot' COVID streams but with additional precautions. This study aimed to evaluate that approach for a consecutive series of CRC cases, diagnosed before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A prospectively populated data set of CRC patients diagnosed between 1 April 2019 and 30 September 2020 was used. Patients presenting before 1 April 2020 were considered 'pre-COVID' and those presenting subsequently as 'COVID era'. RESULTS: Some 344 cases were diagnosed in the 12 months 'pre-COVID' and 166 in the 6 months of the 'COVID era'. The median numbers of days from referral to diagnosis (21 vs 20, p=0.373) and operation (63 vs 61, p=0.208) were unchanged. The 'COVID era' saw an increase in the proportion of radiological diagnoses (39.5% vs 53.0%, p=0.004) with an associated decrease in endoscopic diagnoses (56.7% vs 45.8%, p=0.021). Rates of inoperable (1.5% vs 1.2%, p=0.821), obstructing (11.0% vs 16.2%, p=0.272) and perforated tumours (0.6% vs 1.5%, p=0.492) remained the same. One patient developed COVID-19 perioperatively. Rates of laparoscopic operation (59.5% vs 61.8%, p=0.751), anastomotic leak (6.4% vs 5.9%, p=0.891), re-operative surgery (10.4% vs 4.4%, p=0.138), primary stoma (40.5% vs 32.4%, p=0.244) and 90-day mortality (0.6% vs 1.5%, p=0.492) did not change. CONCLUSIONS: With appropriate infection control measures, it may be safe to continue providing standard elective and urgent CRC care without access to a 'COVID clean' site.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Anticancer Res ; 41(11): 5821-5825, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503030

ABSTRACT

AIM: Anastomotic leakage (AL) in left-sided colorectal cancer is a serious complication, with an incidence rate of 6-18%. We developed a novel predictive model for AL in colorectal surgery with double-stapling technique (DST) anastomosis using auto-artificial intelligence (AI). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 256 patients who underwent curative surgery for left-sided colorectal cancer between 2017 and 2021 were included. In addition to conventional clinicopathological factors, we included the type of circular stapler using DST, conventional double-row circular stapler (DCS) or EEA™ circular stapler with Tri-Staple™ technology, 28 mm Medium/Thick (Covidien, New Haven, CT, USA) which had triple-row circular stapler (TCS) as a covariate. Auto-AI software Prediction One (Sony Network Communications Inc.) was used to predict AL with 5-fold cross validation. Predictive accuracy was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Prediction One also evaluated the 'importance of variables' (IOV) using a method based on permutation feature importance. RESULTS: The area under the curve of the AI model was 0.766. The type of circular stapler used was the most influential factor contributing to AL (IOV=0.551). CONCLUSION: This auto-AI predictive model demonstrated an improvement in accuracy compared to the conventional model. It was suggested that use of a TCS may contribute to a reduction in the AL rate.


Subject(s)
Anastomotic Leak/etiology , Colectomy/adverse effects , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Decision Support Techniques , Machine Learning , Surgical Stapling/adverse effects , Aged , Anastomotic Leak/diagnosis , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Male , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Surgical Staplers , Surgical Stapling/instrumentation , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
14.
Sao Paulo Med J ; 140(2): 244-249, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443888

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the course of diseases that require emergency surgery. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on colorectal cancer disease stage. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective analysis in the city of Rize, Turkey. METHODS: This was a comparative analysis on two groups of patients with various symptoms who underwent surgical colorectal cancer treatment. Group 1 comprised patients operated between March 11, 2019, and December 31, 2019; while group 2 comprised patients at the same time of the year during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Groups 1 and 2 included 56 and 48 patients, respectively. The rate of presentation to the emergency service was higher in Group 2 (P < 0.02). The stage of the pathological lymph nodes and the rate of liver metastasis was higher in Group 2 (P < 0.004 and P < 0.041, respectively). The disease stage was found to be more advanced in Group 2 (P < 0.005). The rate of postoperative complications was higher in Group 2 (P < 0.014). CONCLUSION: The presentation of patients with suspicious findings to the hospital was delayed, due both to the fear of catching COVID-19 and to the pandemic precautions that were proposed and implemented by healthcare authorities worldwide. Among the patients who presented to the hospital with emergency complaints and in whom colorectal cancer was detected, their disease was at a more advanced stage and thus a higher number of emergency oncological surgical procedures were performed on those patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Asian J Surg ; 45(5): 1095-1100, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385022

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has put tremendous strain on healthcare systems. Surgical societies worldwide have advised minimizing non-essential surgeries in order to preserve hospital resources. Given the medical resources and COVID-19 incidence between countries across the world differ, so should colorectal practices. No formal guidelines have emerged from Asia. We wanted to find out what the current practice was in Asian colorectal centres outside China. INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted surgical practice worldwide. At the time of the writing of this paper, there are over 4.2 million cases reported with deaths exceeding 290 000 patients.1 With an abrupt disruption to worldwide supply chains, societal lockdowns and surge of cases into many hospitals, resource allocation was diverted and prioritised for all COVID-19 related services. METHODS: A questionnaire survey of current colorectal practice was carried out involving 3 major colorectal cancer centres, one each from 3 major cities: Singapore, Taichung and Daegu. Components of the survey include infrastructure and manpower, case selection, surgical approach, operating room management and endoscopy practice. RESULTS: All 3 centres continued to provide standard-of-care colorectal cancer surgery despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Two centres deferred surgery for benign colorectal conditions. Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) was still the preferred approach when indicated but with protocolized precautions undertaken. Other services such as pelvic exenteration, TATME and pelvic lymph node dissection were still offered if oncologically indicated. Elective diagnostic endoscopy services have also continued in two centres. CONCLUSION: Elective colorectal services continue to take place in the 3 surveyed Asian hospitals with heightened precautions. Provided there is adequate resource, colorectal cancer services should still continue to prevent consequences of neglecting or delaying cancer treatment. Practice should hence be tailored to the local resource of individual centres accordingly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cities , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Chirurgia (Bucur) ; 116(3): 331-338, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335492

ABSTRACT

Background: Causing healthcare systems overload, COVID-19 pandemic has a huge influence on patients with colorectal cancer. The aim of our study was to assess the potential impact of COVID-19 on the stage of colorectal cancer. Methods: In our retrospective study, two groups of patients operated for colorectal cancer were analyzed at the Clinic for Surgery "Nikola Spasic", Zvezdara University Medical Center. The study group consisted of 49 patients operated in the period from March 15, 2020 to April 2021, during COVID-19 pandemic. The control group consisted of 152 patients, who were operated on in the period from January 1, 2019. to December 31, 2019. Results: There were no difference in surgical approach, prevalence of stoma, percentages of postoperative complications and rates of hospital readmission between both groups. T4b tumor stage was statistically significant more common in the study group (12.2% vs 3.3%, p=0.027). Locally advanced tumors, stage IIC, were statistically significantly more common in the group of patients operated on during the COVID-19 pandemic (10.2% vs 1.3%, p=0.01). Conclusion: Higher number of locally advanced tumors in study group could probably be caused by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
19.
Colorectal Dis ; 23(7): 1613-1614, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311021
20.
Langenbecks Arch Surg ; 406(7): 2383-2390, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Surgical wait list time is a major problem in many health-care systems and its influence on survival is unclear. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of wait list time on long-term disease-free survival in patients scheduled for colorectal cancer resection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study was carried out in patients with colorectal cancer scheduled for surgery at a tertiary care center. Wait list time was defined as the time from completion of diagnostic workup to definitive surgery and divided into 2-week intervals from 0 to 6 weeks. The outcome variables were 2-year and 5-year disease-free survival. RESULTS: A total of 602 patients, 364 (60.5%) male, median age 73 years (range = 71) were defined. The median wait list time was 28 days (range = 99). Two and 5-year disease-free survival rates were 521 (86.5%) and 500 (83.1%) respectively. There were no differences in 2-year or 5-year disease-free survival for the whole cohort or by tumor stage between wait list time intervals except for AJCC stage II tumors which showed a higher 5-year disease-free survival for the 2-4 and 4-6-week wait list time interval (p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: Time from diagnosis to definitive surgery up to 6 weeks is not associated with a decrease in 2-year or 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) in AJCC stage I through III colorectal cancer patients. These are important findings in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic and offer a window of opportunity for preoperative optimization and prehabilitation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Aged , Cohort Studies , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Disease-Free Survival , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL