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1.
Clinics ; 76: e2507, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1870057

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), all health services worldwide underwent profound changes, leading to the suspension of many elective surgeries. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of elective colorectal surgery during the pandemic. METHODS: This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, single-center study. Patients who underwent elective colorectal surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic between March 10 and September 9, 2020, were included. Patient data on sex, age, diagnosis, types of procedures, hospital stay, mortality, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) preoperative screening tests were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 103 colorectal surgical procedures were planned, and 99 were performed. Four surgeries were postponed due to positive preoperative screening for SARS-CoV-2. Surgical procedures were performed for colorectal cancer (n=90) and inflammatory bowel disease (n=9). Laparoscopy was the approach of choice for 43 patients (43.4%), 53 (53.5%) procedures were open, and 3 (3%) procedures were robotic. Five patients developed COVID-19 in the postoperative period, and three of them died in the intensive care unit (n=3/5, 60% mortality). Two other patients died due to surgical complications unrelated to COVID-19 (n=2/94, 2.1% mortality) (p<0.01). Hospital stay was longer in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection than in those without (38.4 versushttps://doi.org/10.3 days, respectively, p<0.01). Of the 99 patients who received surgical care during the pandemic, 94 were safely discharged (95%). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that elective colorectal surgical procedures may be safely performed during the pandemic; however, preoperative testing should be performed to reduce in-hospital infection rates, since the mortality rate due to SARS-CoV-2 in this setting is particularly high.


Subject(s)
Humans , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Surgery , Coronavirus Infections , Cross-Sectional Studies , Retrospective Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus
2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(5): e2211071, 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1825768
3.
Minerva Surg ; 77(1): 30-34, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754139

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disrupted healthcare delivery. We aimed to describe a novel strategy to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on a tertiary referral proctology center during the first wave of infection in Italy. METHODS: All patients booked appointments at the Proctology Unit between March 9th and May 4th, 2020 were identified. Patients booked for a first visit underwent a structured remote consultation. Patients with perianal or sacrococcygeal abscesses, major anorectal bleeding, incoercible anal pain and red flags for malignancy were labelled as "non-deferrable." A flowchart was designed to comply with adequate assistance of proctologic patients. Demographics, clinical data and outcomes of in-office procedures were collected. RESULTS: On a total of 548 booked visits, 198 (36.1%) were cancelled before remote consultation. Of the remaining 350, 112 (32.0%) attended a follow-up visit. Among 238 (68.0%) patients undergoing remote consultation, 88 (25.1%) were deemed "deferrable" and 148 (42.3%) "non-deferrable." Two (0.6%) were hospitalized for COVID-19 while waiting for an outpatient visit. Twenty-five of 88 (28.4%) deferrable patients cancelled their appointment as felt no longer necessary. A total of 45 of 148 (30.4%) non deferrable patients (mean age, 46 years; 31% females) underwent in-office procedures, most often related to anal abscess and/or fistula (48.9%). Final diagnosis of malignancy occurred in four cases. A 55% increase in the number of in-office procedures was noted compared to the previous year. None of the attending patients nor staff members resulted COVID-19 positive during the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the uncertainties accompanying the use of remote consultations in proctology, the results of this study may inform the development of strategies for restructuring activities in response to future emergencies of this magnitude.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Surgery , Remote Consultation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Surgery ; 172(1): 83-88, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The need to continue providing care to patients during the corona virus disease 2019 pandemic facilitated telemedicine's rapid adoption, including in surgical clinic settings. Our purpose was to evaluate integration of telemedicine into an academic colorectal surgery practice and assess physician experiences providing telemedicine care. METHODS: Patients seen in colorectal surgery clinic by telemedicine and in person from March 31, 2020 to August 31, 2020 were evaluated. Demographic and clinical outcomes were assessed for patients. Physician responses to a survey were collected. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty-one telemedicine visits were performed by 4 physicians, comprising 20% of visits during the study period. Patients were 47.6% male and 90.9% Caucasian. In addition, 85.7% were established patients and 21.2% were postoperative visits. Diagnoses evaluated by telemedicine included benign and malignant anorectal and colorectal disease as well as inflammatory bowel disease. All providers reported being able to provide adequate care via telemedicine and were planning to continue providing telemedicine. Patients seen via telemedicine were more likely to be Caucasian and less likely to be African American (P < .001) and more likely to be established patients than those seen in person (P < .001). CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine was most successfully used to facilitate care for established patients, particularly the long-term care of colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. We identified significant differences in ethnicity between patients seen via telemedicine and those seen in person. Telemedicine represents an exciting advancement in patient care, although ongoing study is required regarding providing access to this technology to all colorectal surgery patients, particularly minority populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Surgery , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Telemedicine , Female , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/surgery , Male , Pandemics
6.
BMJ Open ; 11(11): e045526, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501709

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol provides optimised care guidelines for patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. To ensure high compliance with active ERAS elements, patients must be educated to actively participate in the perioperative care pathway. Mobile health is a rapidly expanding area of the digital health sector that is effective in educating and engaging patients during follow-up. iColon is a mobile application designed by the Operative Unit of General Surgery of IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital of Negrar of Valpolicella, which is specifically targeted at patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. iColon is organised into ERAS phases, and it provides real-time feedback to surgeons about a patient's adherence to perioperative active ERAS elements. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We hypothesise that by providing a patient-focused mobile application, compliance with active ERAS elements could be improved.The first coprimary objective is to build patient confidence in using the mobile application, iColon, during perioperative care. The second coprimary objective is to establish patient compliance with active ERAS elements.Secondary objectives include examining: length of stay, 30-day readmission rate, postoperative complications and patient satisfaction of received care.This study is a prospective observational real-world study of patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery who are following the ERAS protocol and using iColon during perioperative periods between September 2020 and December 2022.By educating and engaging patients in the ERAS protocol, the mobile application, iColon, should stimulate patients to be more proactive in managing their healthcare by complying more closely with active ERAS elements. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has been approved by the local Ethics Committee with the protocol number 29219 of 25 May 2020. The results will be actively disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and various community engagement activities.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Surgery , Digestive System Surgical Procedures , Mobile Applications , Humans , Length of Stay , Observational Studies as Topic , Perioperative Care , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control
10.
Updates Surg ; 74(1): 163-170, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326858

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is revolutionizing healthcare delivery. The aim of the study was to reach consensus among experts on the possible applications of telemedicine in colorectal surgery. A group of 48 clinical practice recommendations (CPRs) was developed by a clinical guidance group based on coalescence of evidence and expert opinion. The Telemedicine in Colorectal Surgery Italian Working Group included 54 colorectal surgeons affiliated to the Italian Society of Colo-Rectal Surgery (SICCR) who were involved in the evaluation of the appropriateness of each CPR, based on published RAND/UCLA methodology, in two rounds. Stakeholders' median age was 44.5 (IQR 36-60) years, and 44 (81%) were males. Agreement was obtained on the applicability of telemonitoring and telemedicine for multidisciplinary pre-operative evaluation. The panel voted against the use of telemedicine for a first consultation. 15/48 statements deemed uncertain on round 1 and were re-elaborated and assessed by 51/54 (94%) panelists on round 2. Consensus was achieved in all but one statement concerning the cost of a teleconsultation. There was strong agreement on the usefulness of teleconsultation during follow-up of patients with diverticular disease after an in-person visit. This e-consensus provides the boundaries of telemedicine in colorectal surgery in Italy. Standardization of infrastructures and costs remains to be better elucidated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Surgery , Telemedicine , Adult , Consensus , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Chirurg ; 92(10): 924-928, 2021 Oct.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309023

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has led to far-reaching changes in the treatment reality in practically all fields of medicine. OBJECTIVE: Recommendations on the perioperative management with respect to SARS-CoV­2 and presentation of the impact of the pandemic on colorectal surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A systematic literature search was carried out. RESULTS: Perioperative SARS-CoV­2 infections lead to a clearly increased postoperative mortality and must be avoided by a structured bundle of measures. The worldwide limitations on screening investigations and treatment options can in the medium term result in an increased mortality due to colorectal cancer. In emergency treatment there was also a substantial reduction in case numbers with the danger of delayed interventions. CONCLUSION: A rapid normalization of clinical treatment pathways in colorectal surgery is necessary to avoid long-term negative sequelae for patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Surgery , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J. coloproctol. (Rio J., Impr.) ; 41(2): 111-116, June 2021. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1303813

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world health scenario, causing numerous problems related to the overload of services. In this scenario, the approach to oncological diseases becomes a challenge, considering the risk of progression of cancer disease and death due to delay in diagnosis and treatment. Faced with this exceptional situation, coloproctology services have been forced to change their routine to adapt to the new reality, considering risks and benefits in the conduct of these patients. Thus, the experience of the coloproctology service at the Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, state of São Paulo, Brazil, during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic is described, evaluating the possibility of maintaining elective oncological surgeries through selection by directed anamnesis. Method: Retrospective cohort study with prospective collection comparing colorectal surgery for cancer before and during the pandemic from December 2019 to July 2020. Results: In total, 81 patients were included. During the pandemic, 41 patients were operated on with 2 perioperative contaminations by COVID-19. Both length of stay and complications were not different between groups. Conclusion: Since there was no increase in COVID-19 morbidity and mortality in elective oncology surgeries with patients screened for guided anamnesis, it is worth considering this method for maintaining surgical procedures even in the event of apandemic. (AU)


A pandemia do COVID-19 modificou o cenário mundial da saúde, ocasionando inúmeros problemas relacionados à sobrecarga dos serviços. Neste contexto, a abordagem das doenças oncológicas se tornou um desafio, tendo em vista que o atraso no diagnóstico e no tratamento oncológico resulta emmaior risco de progressão de doença e óbito. Frente a esta situação excepcional, os serviços de coloproctologia foram obrigados a mudar a rotina, considerando riscos e benefícios na condução dos pacientes. Assim, descreve-se a experiência do serviço de coloproctologia da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, durante o início da pandemia de COVID-19, avaliando a possibilidade de manutenção das cirurgias eletivas oncológicas através da seleção por anamnese dirigida. Método: Coorte retrospectiva com coleta prospectiva comparando cirurgias colorretais oncológicas realizadas de dezembro de 2019 a julho de 20202, comparando casos operados antes e durante a pandemia. Resultados: No total, 81 pacientes foram incluídos. Durante a pandemia, 41 pacientes foram operados, com duas contaminações perioperatórias por COVID-19. Nem o tempo de internação nem as complicações foram diferentes entre os grupos. Conclusão: Uma vez que não houve aumento da morbimortalidade por COVID-19 nas cirurgias oncológicas eletivas com pacientes triados por anamnese dirigida, vale considerar este método para a manutenção dos procedimentos cirúrgicos mesmo em vigência da pandemia. (AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Elective Surgical Procedures , Colorectal Surgery , COVID-19/physiopathology , Postoperative Complications
14.
Minerva Surg ; 77(1): 30-34, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281003

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disrupted healthcare delivery. We aimed to describe a novel strategy to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on a tertiary referral proctology center during the first wave of infection in Italy. METHODS: All patients booked appointments at the Proctology Unit between March 9th and May 4th, 2020 were identified. Patients booked for a first visit underwent a structured remote consultation. Patients with perianal or sacrococcygeal abscesses, major anorectal bleeding, incoercible anal pain and red flags for malignancy were labelled as "non-deferrable." A flowchart was designed to comply with adequate assistance of proctologic patients. Demographics, clinical data and outcomes of in-office procedures were collected. RESULTS: On a total of 548 booked visits, 198 (36.1%) were cancelled before remote consultation. Of the remaining 350, 112 (32.0%) attended a follow-up visit. Among 238 (68.0%) patients undergoing remote consultation, 88 (25.1%) were deemed "deferrable" and 148 (42.3%) "non-deferrable." Two (0.6%) were hospitalized for COVID-19 while waiting for an outpatient visit. Twenty-five of 88 (28.4%) deferrable patients cancelled their appointment as felt no longer necessary. A total of 45 of 148 (30.4%) non deferrable patients (mean age, 46 years; 31% females) underwent in-office procedures, most often related to anal abscess and/or fistula (48.9%). Final diagnosis of malignancy occurred in four cases. A 55% increase in the number of in-office procedures was noted compared to the previous year. None of the attending patients nor staff members resulted COVID-19 positive during the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the uncertainties accompanying the use of remote consultations in proctology, the results of this study may inform the development of strategies for restructuring activities in response to future emergencies of this magnitude.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Surgery , Remote Consultation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Updates Surg ; 73(5): 1775-1786, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274974

ABSTRACT

Several regimens of oral and intravenous antibiotics (OIVA) have been proposed with contradicting results, and the role of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is still controversial. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of oral antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing Surgical Site Infections (SSI) in elective colorectal surgery. In a multicentre trial, we randomized patients undergoing elective colorectal resection surgery, comparing the effectiveness of OIVA versus intravenous antibiotics (IVA) regimens to prevent SSI as the primary outcome (NCT04438655). In addition to intravenous Amoxicillin/Clavulanic, patients in the OIVA group received Oral Neomycin and Bacitracin 24 h before surgery. MBP was administered according to local habits which were not changed for the study. The trial was terminated during the COVID-19 pandemic, as many centers failed to participate as well as the pandemic changed the rules for engaging patients. Two-hundred and four patients were enrolled (100 in the OIVA and 104 in the IVA group); 3 SSIs (3.4%) were registered in the OIVA and 14 (14.4%) in the IVA group (p = 0.010). No difference was observed in terms of anastomotic leak. Multivariable analysis indicated that OIVA reduced the rate of SSI (OR 0.21 / 95% CI 0.06-0.78 / p = 0.019), while BMI is a risk factor of SSI (OR 1.15 / 95% CI 1.01-1.30 p = 0.039). Subgroup analysis indicated that 0/22 patients who underwent OIVA/MBP + vs 13/77 IVA/MBP- experienced an SSI (p = 0.037). The early termination of the study prevents any conclusion regarding the interpretation of the data. Nonetheless, Oral Neomycin/Bacitracin and intravenous beta-lactam/beta-lactamases inhibitors seem to reduce SSI after colorectal resections, although not affecting the anastomotic leak in this trial. The role of MBP requires more investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Surgery , Administration, Oral , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antibiotic Prophylaxis , Bacitracin , Cathartics/therapeutic use , Colectomy , Colorectal Surgery/adverse effects , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Neomycin , Pandemics , Preoperative Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Wound Infection/epidemiology , Surgical Wound Infection/prevention & control
17.
Surg Innov ; 29(1): 35-43, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181067

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The pandemic produced by SARS-CoV-2 has obliged us to set up the tele-assistance to offer a continuity of care. This implies an innovation, being the degree of satisfaction of patients unknown. Methods: A telephonic survey was conducted with the validated in the Spanish tool Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (Telehealth Usability Questionnaire; rating from 1-7) of all candidate patients assisted consecutively in the Coloproctology Unit. We included demographic variables, education level, job status, diagnosis and consultation type. A descriptive study was done. The relationship between the willingness of consultation model in the future (telemedicine vs traditional) and the categorical variables was analysed through the chi-squared test. Results: A total of 115 patients were included. The average age was 59.9 years, being 60% women. The average score in each of the survey items was higher than 6 in all the questions but 1. 26.1% of the surveyed patients confessed being advocated to tele-assistance in the future. The only factors related to greater willingness to tele-assistance were male gender (37% vs 18.8%; P = .03) and a higher academic preparation level in favour of higher technical studies (35.9%) and university studies (32.4%) opposite to the rest (P = .043). The rest of variables studied, job status, labour regimen, diagnostic group and consultation type did not show any relationship. Conclusions: A vast majority of patients answered favourably to almost all the items of the survey. However, only 26.1% of them would choose a model of tele-assistance without restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Surgery , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
18.
Am J Surg ; 222(4): 759-765, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163314

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To focus on critical care needs of coronavirus patients, elective operations were postponed and selectively rescheduled. The effect of these measures on patients was unknown. We sought to understand patients' perspectives regarding surgical care during the CoVID-19 pandemic to improve future responses. METHODS: We performed qualitative interviews with patients whose operations were postponed. Interviews explored patient responses to: 1) surgery postponement; 2) experience of surgery; 3) impacts of rescheduling/postponement on emotional/physical health; 4) identifying areas of improvement. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed through an integrated approach. RESULTS: Patient perspectives fell within the following domains: 1) reactions to surgery postponement/rescheduling; 2) experience of surgery during CoVID-19 pandemic; 3) reflections on communication; 4) patient trust in surgeons and healthcare. CONCLUSIONS: We found no patient-reported barriers to rescheduling surgery. Several areas of care which could be improved (communication). There was an unexpected sense of trust in surgeons and the hospital.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/prevention & control , Colorectal Surgery/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Patient Satisfaction , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colorectal Surgery/standards , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Communication , Digestive System Surgical Procedures , Elective Surgical Procedures , Female , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Qualitative Research , Trust , Young Adult
19.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e047235, 2021 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150242

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Prehabilitation in colorectal surgery is evolving and may minimise postoperative morbidity and mortality. With many different healthcare professionals contributing to the prehabilitation literature, there is significant variation in reported primary endpoints that restricts comparison. In addition, there has been limited work on patient-related outcome measures suggesting that patients with colorectal cancer needs and issues are being overlooked. The Defining Standards in Colorectal Optimisation Study aims to achieve international consensus from all stakeholders on key standards to provide a framework for reporting future prehabilitation research. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A systematic review will identify key standards reported in trials of prehabilitation in colorectal surgery. Standards that are important to patients will be identified by a patient and public involvement (PPI) event. The longlist of standards generated from the systematic review and PPI event will be used to develop a three-round online Delphi process. This will engage all stakeholders (healthcare professionals and patients) both nationally and internationally. The results of the Delphi will be followed by a face-to-face interactive consensus meeting that will define the final standards for prehabilitation for elective colorectal surgery. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The University of Glasgow College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences Ethics Committee has approved this protocol, which is registered as a study (200190120) with the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials Initiative. Publication of the standards developed by all stakeholders will increase the potential for comparative research that advances understanding of the clinical application of prehabilitation. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42019120381.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Surgery , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans , Preoperative Exercise , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic
20.
Surgery ; 170(2): 405-411, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144943

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 is revolutionizing healthcare delivery. The aim of this study was to reach a consensus among experts as to the possible applications of telemedicine in the proctologic field. METHODS: A group of 55 clinical practice recommendations was developed by a clinical guidance group based on coalescence of evidence and expert opinion. The Telemedicine in Proctology Italian Working Group included 47 Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery nominated experts evaluating the appropriateness of each clinical practice recommendations based on published RAND/UCLA methodology in 2 rounds. RESULTS: Stakeholder median age was 53 years (interquartile range limits 40-60), and 38 (81%) were men. Nine (19%) panelists reported no experience with telemedicine before the pandemic. Agreement was obtained on a minimum of 3 to 5 years of practice in the proctologic field before starting teleconsultations, which should be regularly paid, with advice and prescriptions incorporated into a formal report sent to the patient by e-mail along with a receipt. Of the panelists, 35 of 47 (74%) agreed that teleconsultation carries the risk of misdiagnosis of cancer, thus recommending an in-person assessment before scheduling any surgery. Fifteen additional clinical practice recommendations were re-elaborated in the second round and assessed by 44 of 47 (93.6%) panelists. The application of telemedicine for the diagnosis of common proctologic conditions (eg, hemorrhoidal disease, anal abscess and fistula, anal condylomas, and anal fissure) and functional pelvic floor disorders was generally considered inappropriate. Teleconsultation was instead deemed appropriate for the diagnosis and management of pilonidal disease. CONCLUSION: This e-consensus revealed the boundaries of telemedicine in Italy. Standardization of infrastructures, logistics, and legality remain to be better elucidated.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Surgery/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
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