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1.
Prim Health Care Res Dev ; 23: e56, 2022 09 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106284

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted healthcare worldwide. It has altered service delivery and posed challenges to practitioners in relation to workload, well-being and support. Within primary care, changes in physicians' activities have been identified and innovative work solutions implemented. However, evidence is lacking regarding the impact of the pandemic on pharmacy personnel who work in primary care. AIM: To explore the impact of the pandemic on the working practice (including the type of services provided) and job satisfaction of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians within Scottish general practice. Due to the stressful nature of the pandemic, we hypothesise that job satisfaction will have been negatively affected. METHODS: An online questionnaire was distributed in May-July 2021, approximately 15 months since initial lockdown measures in the UK. The questionnaire was informed by previous literature and underwent expert review and piloting. Analysis involved descriptive statistics, non-parametric statistical tests and thematic analysis. RESULTS: 180 participants responded (approximated 16.1% response rate): 134 pharmacists (74.4%) and 46 technicians (25.6%). Responses indicated greater involvement with administrative tasks and a reduction in the provision of clinical services, which was negatively perceived by pharmacists. There was an increase in remote working, although most participants continued to have a physical presence within general practices. Face-to-face interactions with patients reduced, which was negatively perceived by participants, and telephone consults were considered efficient yet less effective. Professional development activities were challenged by increased workloads and reduced support available. Although workplace stress was apparent, there was no indication of widespread job dissatisfaction. CONCLUSION: The pandemic has impacted pharmacists and technicians, but it is unknown if changes will be permanent, and there is a need to understand which changes should continue. Future research should explore the impact of altered service delivery, including remote working, on patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmacy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Primary Health Care
2.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 557-562, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100778

ABSTRACT

The world is amidst the COVID-19 pandemic that has used social distancing as a tool for containing the virus from spreading exponentially among other individuals. Previous literature suggests that human contact and attachment is a key for well-being which is why punishments like solitary confinement in detention centers like jail has always been debated as being torturous (Wolfendal 2020). With this notion, anxiety and stress may become more prevalent in individuals who experience self-isolation or are under a forced lockdown. For health-care workers like doctors and psychologists, who advocate for physical health, mental health and wellbeing; the challenges might increase during the pandemic phase as they are expected to go through the crises just like others while simultaneously contributing in rendering services related to dealing with physical and psychological health issues present in patients and clients with their continued practice from either on-site or online platforms. Although all health care professional's training inoculates the ill effects of compassion fatigue by other's overwhelming situations and discussions but they might still be prone to vicarious burnout, trauma and stress. Hence, they may become exposed to being at risk of experiencing anxiety more than the general population. This review discusses facets of the importance of self-care as mental health first aid tool for health care professionals including doctors and psychologists using research and supportive techniques to help them process stress and anxiety during and after the global pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care
3.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 536-548, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many research has indicated that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, health care workers are under greatly increased pressure and at increased risk for the development of mental health problems. Furthermore, previous research has indicated that psychiatrists are exposed to a number of unique stressors that may increase their risk for poor mental health. The aims of the present study were to assess the level of COVID-19 related concerns, psychological distress and life satisfaction among psychiatrists and other physicians during the first period of the pandemic and to examine whether individual differences in COVID-19 concerns, psychological flexibility, psychological resilience and coping behaviors account for differences in mental health indicators. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The sample consisted of N=725 physicians, among whom 22.8% were psychiatrists. This study was conducted online during the first lockdown in Croatia and collected data regarding COVID-19 related concerns, coping behaviors and mental health indicators (Psychological Distress and Life Satisfaction). RESULTS: Physicians of other specialties had higher scores on a measure of COVID-19 anxiety than psychiatrists (p=0.012). In addition, a number of differences in coping behaviors are evident. Specifically, psychiatrists were less likely than physicians of other specializations to believe that being informed about COVID-19 is an effective coping strategy (p=0.013), but more prone to using sedatives and drugs as a coping strategy (p=0.002; p=0.037). CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatrists are at special risk for substance abuse. Younger age, psychological inflexibility, low resilience and greater COVID-19 concerns might act as specific risk factors for distress. Our findings highlight the need for promoting a healthy lifestyle and psychological flexibility as universal protective factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Psychiatry , Communicable Disease Control , Croatia , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Protective Factors , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Medwave ; 22(9): e2591, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100304

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Understanding the psychological and behavioral reactions to emerging infectious diseases is crucial in managing outbreaks. This study sought to explain family members' experiences of individual memories and coping with the COVID-19 lockdown. Methods: An exploratory, descriptive and qualitative research was conducted by content analysis in Lorestan province, Iran. The purposive sampling was continued by achieving data saturation, reaching 29 samples. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted to family members who stayed at home during the COVID-19-induced lockdown. The data was collected from October 2020 to February 2021. Content analysis presented by Graneheim and Lundman was used to analyze the data. Results: The findings of this study contained 100 codes and five categories with its respective subcategories. Categories included taking advantage of opportunities (increasing intimate communication in the family; compensation and progress), coping mechanisms (creating fun and creativity at home; trying to spend leisure time; sports, reading books, music; increasing patience and tolerance; and forced Internet communications), social aspects (positive and negative), outcomes (gratefulness, pleasure, and happiness; concerns; psychological aspects; and damage and challenge to the foundation of families), and economic aspects (cost savings; recession/job loss/financial downturn; and low-income families' unaffordability to prepare electronics for education). Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic and its induced-lockdown have affected various aspects of family life and its pros and cons have been presented by the participants. Policymakers must design and implement programs in line with this change in the public's lifestyles so that families are not damaged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Family/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Qualitative Research
6.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev ; 23(5): 1497-1504, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100936

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A systematic review and meta-analysis were carried out to assess the pooled proportion of women screened for cervical cancer before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: After ruling out registered or ongoing systematic reviews in the PROSPERO database regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in cervical cancer screening, the protocol of our systematic review and meta-analysis was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42021279305). The electronic databases were searched for articles published in English between January 2020 and October 2021and the study was designed based on PRISMA guidelines updated in 2020. Meta-analysis was accomplished in STATA version 13.0 (College Station, Texas 77,845 USA). The pooled proportion of women who had undergone cervical cancer screening was reported with 95% CI. In order to quantify the heterogeneity, Chi2 statistic (Q statistic) and I2 index were used. RESULTS: The meta-analysis included seven studies from Slovenia, Italy, Ontario (Canada), Scotland, Belgium, and the USA, comprising 403,986 women and 199,165 women who were screened for cervical cancer before the COVID-19 pandemic in 2019 and during the pandemic in 2020, respectively. The pooled proportion of women screened for cervical cancer in 2019 was 9.79% (95% CI 6.00%-13.59%, 95% prediction interval 0.42%-23.81%). During the pandemic, the pooled proportion of screened women declined to 4.24% (95% CI 2.77%-5.71%, 95% prediction interval 0.9%-17.49%). CONCLUSION: There was a substantial drop in the cervical cancer screening rate due to lockdowns and travel restrictions to curb the COVID-19 pandemic. Scaling up cervical cancer screening strategies is essential to prevent the long-term impact of cervical cancer burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology
11.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 30(1): 12, 2022 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098408

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given that Swedish authorities have been widely viewed as having practiced an unusual approach to the COVID-19 pandemic and given that Sweden is notable for a low incidence of trauma, we wanted to learn how the pandemic may have affected the number of trauma admissions in Sweden. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on the Swedish trauma registry (Svenska Traumaregistret). The study period was March 1, 2020 to June 30, 2020. As a basis for comparison, the record for the same time during the previous year, 2019 was used. RESULTS: During the four months of the first wave of COVID-19, 2020 there was a decline of 24.2% in the total number of trauma patients in Sweden. There was no significant change in 30-day mortality rates, 4.7% 2019 and 5.1% 2020, (p = 0.30). The number of injuries per patient was higher during the pandemic 3.8 injuries 2019 and 4.1 injuries 2020 (p = 0.02). The NISS 6, 2019 and 8, 2020 was higher during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: As a consequence of what were seen by many as all too lenient actions taken to deal with COVID-19 in Sweden during spring 2020, there was still a reduction in trauma admissions most likely due to an adherence to the voluntary recommendations, the reduction was not as prominent as what was seen in many countries with harsher restrictions and lockdowns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sweden/epidemiology
12.
BMC Emerg Med ; 22(1): 176, 2022 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The collateral damage of SARS-CoV-2 is a serious concern in the Emergency Medicine (EM) community, specifically in relation to delayed care increasing morbidity and mortality in attendances unrelated to COVID-19. The objectives of this study are to describe the profile of patients attending an Irish ED prior to, and during the pandemic, and to investigate the factors influencing ED utilisation in this cohort. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study with recruitment at three time-points prior to the onset of COVID-19 in December 2019 (n = 47) and February 2020 (n = 57) and post-Lockdown 1 in July 2020 (n = 70). At each time-point all adults presenting over a 24 h period were eligible for inclusion. Clinical data were collected via electronic records and a questionnaire provided information on demographics, healthcare utilisation, service awareness and factors influencing the decision to attend the ED. Data analysis was performed in SPSS and included descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: The demographic and clinical profile of patients across time-points was comparable in terms of age (p = 0.904), gender (p = 0.584) and presenting complaint (p = 0.556). Median length of stay in the ED decreased from 7.25 h (IQR 4.18-11.22) in February to 3.86 h (IQR 0.41-9.14) in July (p ≤ 0.005) and differences were observed in disposition (p ≤ 0.001). COVID-19 influenced decision to attend the ED for 31% of patients with 9% delaying presentation. Post-lockdown, patients were less likely to attend the ED for reassurance (p ≤ 0.005), for a second opinion (p ≤ 0.005) or to see a specialist (p ≤ 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Demographic and clinical presentations of ED patients prior to the first COVID-19 lockdown and during the reopening phase were comparable, however, COVID-19 significantly impacted health-seeking behaviour and operational metrics in the ED at this phase of the pandemic. These findings provide useful information for hospitals with regard to pandemic preparedness and also have wider implications for planning of future health service delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Communicable Disease Control , Retrospective Studies
13.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(10)2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097968

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic reversed much of global progress made in combatting tuberculosis, with South Africa experiencing one of the largest impacts on tuberculosis detection. The aim of this paper is to share our experiences in applying learning health systems (LHS) thinking to the codevelopment of an intervention improving an integrated response to COVID-19 and tuberculosis in a South African district. A sequential partially mixed-methods study was undertaken between 2018 and 2021 in the district of Amajuba in KwaZulu-Natal. Here, we report on the formulation of a Theory of Change, codesigning and refining proposed interventions, and piloting and evaluating codesigned interventions in primary healthcare facilities, through an LHS lens. Following the establishment and formalisation of a district Learning Community, diagnostic work and a codevelopment of a theory of change, intervention packages tailored according to pandemic lockdowns were developed, piloted and scaled up. This process illustrates how a community of learning can generate more responsive, localised interventions, and suggests that the establishment of a shared space of research governance can provide a degree of resilience to facilitate adaption to external shocks. Four main lessons have been gleaned from our experience in adopting an LHS approach in a South African district, which are (1) the importance of building and sustaining relationships, (2) the utility of colearning, coproduction and adaptive capacity, (3) the centrality of theory-driven systems strengthening and (4) reflections on LHS as a framework.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Learning Health System , Tuberculosis , Humans , South Africa , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control
14.
Span J Psychol ; 24: e13, 2021 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096600

ABSTRACT

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the consequences of conspiracy theories and the COVID-19 pandemic raised this interest to another level. In this article, I will outline what we know about the consequences of conspiracy theories for individuals, groups, and society, arguing that they are certainly not harmless. In particular, research suggests that conspiracy theories are associated with political apathy, support for non-normative political action, climate denial, vaccine refusal, prejudice, crime, violence, disengagement in the workplace, and reluctance to adhere to COVID-19 recommendations. In this article, I will also discuss the challenges of dealing with the negative consequences of conspiracy theories, which present some opportunities for future research.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Health Behavior , Politics , Prejudice , Vaccination Refusal , Apathy , Attitude , Climate Change , Crime , Culture , Denial, Psychological , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Personnel Loyalty , SARS-CoV-2 , Violence
15.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(2): 140-144, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096528

ABSTRACT

India is a de facto continent in the garb of a country. COVID-19 is an unprecedented global pandemic spanning continents. Being the second most populous country in the world, experts regard how India deals with the outbreak will have enormous impact on the world's ability to deal with it. The country has been in lockdown since March 25, 2020 until the current time of early May 2020, and despite several challenges, there has been early success. The major conflict now is the health benefits weighed up against the deleterious social and economic consequences of prolonged lockdown, that is, life versus livelihood. This unprecedented calamity could potentially cause or exacerbate various psychiatric disorders. It is recognized that lifestyle changes and limited screen time may help reduce mental health difficulties. Considering the physical barriers to consultation, development of telemedicine services is needed. This pandemic, like other previous pandemics, will pass, and until this happens, we must remain extremely vigilant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , India/epidemiology , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2
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