Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Indian J Public Health ; 66(2): 147-151, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1954316

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite several efforts to limit the viral transmission, the COVID-19 vaccine has been the only "the ray of hope" to end the pandemic. However, vaccine hesitancy could reduce coverage and hinder herd immunity. People's intention to get vaccinated can be shaped by several factors, including risk perception which, in turn, is influenced by effect. The need to acquaint oneself to the beliefs, concerns, and circumstances of one's own population in the community becomes important for successful implementation of the program. Therefore, the present study was conducted to gain insights into perceptions of vaccination. Objectives: The objective is to understand the felicitating factors and hindering factors for acceptance of vaccines by the population among people aged 50 years in urban field practice area of the Department of Community Medicine in a Tertiary care teaching hospital, Hyderabad. Subjects and Methods: Data were extracted from audio recording of five focus group discussions that were conducted in the urban field practice care of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Hyderabad through open-ended questions. Categories, subcategories, and themes were created by deductive approach. Results: The motivating factors for vaccine acceptance were found to be fear of getting disease, wanting to return normalcy, and trust in treating doctors, whereas, barriers were fear of death due to vaccine, opacity in vaccine details, anxiety, and misinterpretation of adverse events. Conclusion: Having a clear understanding about the belief system of the target population could help in designing the guidelines for vaccination program to escalate the immunization and increase the acceptance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Community Medicine , Focus Groups , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , India , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Phobic Disorders , Tertiary Healthcare , Vaccination
2.
Braz J Infect Dis ; 26(2): 102347, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748190

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several therapies have been used or proposed for the treatment of COVID-19, although their effectiveness and safety have not been properly evaluated. The purpose of this document is to provide recommendations to support decisions about the drug treatment of outpatients with COVID-19 in Brazil. METHODS: A panel consisting of experts from different clinical fields, representatives of the Brazilian Ministry of Health, and methodologists (37 members in total) was responsible for preparing these guidelines. A rapid guideline development method was used, based on the adoption and/or adaptation of recommendations from existing international guidelines combined with additional structured searches for primary studies and new recommendations whenever necessary (GRADE-ADOLOPMENT). The rating of quality of evidence and the drafting of recommendations followed the GRADE method. RESULTS: Ten technologies were evaluated, and 10 recommendations were prepared. Recommendations were made against the use of anticoagulants, azithromycin, budesonide, colchicine, corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine/chloroquine alone or combined with azithromycin, ivermectin, nitazoxanide, and convalescent plasma. It was not possible to make a recommendation regarding the use of monoclonal antibodies in outpatients, as their benefit is uncertain and their cost is high, with limitations of availability and implementation. CONCLUSION: To date, few therapies have demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of outpatients with COVID-19. Recommendations are restricted to what should not be used, in order to provide the best treatment according to the principles of evidence-based medicine and to promote resource savings by aboiding ineffective treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Communicable Diseases , Emergency Medicine , Geriatrics , Azithromycin , Brazil , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Community Medicine , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Outpatients , Vascular Surgical Procedures
3.
Hong Kong Med J ; 26(4): 355-357, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468755
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463647

ABSTRACT

Stress is one of the most common problems among healthcare professionals, as they are exposed to potentially stressful and emotionally challenging situations in the workplace. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) training programs have been shown to decrease stress. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an abbreviated 4-weeks MBSR training program in relation to a standard 8-weeks one on the stress levels. A controlled and randomized clinical trial was designed, in which 112 tutors and resident intern specialists in Family and Community Medicine and Nursing of six Spanish National Health System teaching units (TUs) participated. Participants included in the experimental groups (EGs) received a MBRS training program (standard or abbreviated), while control group (CG) participants did not receive any intervention. The stress levels were assessed by the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ) in three different moments during the study: before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Adjusted covariance analysis (ANCOVA), using pretest scores as the covariate, showed a significant reduction in stress (F(2,91) = 5.165; p = 0.008; η2 = 0.102) in the post-test visit, attributable to the implementation of the standard training program, but without the maintenance of its effects over time. No significant impact of the abbreviated training program on stress levels was observed in the intergroup comparison. A standard 8-weeks MBSR training program aimed at tutors and resident intern specialists in Family and Community Medicine and Nursing produces significant improvements in stress levels compared with the abbreviated intervention and no intervention. New studies about abbreviated training programs are needed to provide effective treatments which improve well-being of these professionals.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Community Medicine , Empathy , Humans , Spain , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(8)2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194645

ABSTRACT

Health professionals are among the most vulnerable to work stress and emotional exhaustion problems. These health professionals include tutors and resident intern specialists, due to the growing demand for the former and the high work overload of the latter. Mindfulness training programs can support these professionals during times of crisis, such as the current global pandemic caused by the coronavirus-19 disease. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an abbreviated Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) training program in relation to a standard training program on the levels of mindfulness, self-compassion, and self-perceived empathy in tutors and resident intern specialists of Family and Community Medicine and Nursing. A total of 112 professionals attached to six Spanish National Health System teaching units (TUs) participated in this randomized and controlled clinical trial. Experimental Group (GE) participants were included in the standard or abbreviated MBSR programs. The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), the Self-Compassion Scale short form (SCS-SF), and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) were administered three times during the study: before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Adjusted covariance analysis (ANCOVA), using pretest scores as the covariate, showed a significant increase in mindfulness (F(2,91) = 3.271; p = 0.042; η2 = 0.067) and self-compassion (F(2,91) = 6.046; p = 0.003; η2 = 0.117) in the post-test visit, and in self-compassion (F(2,79) = 3.880; p = 0.025; η2 = 0.089) in the follow-up visit, attributable to the implementation of the standard training program. The standard MBSR and MSC training program improves levels of mindfulness and self-compassion, and promotes long-lasting effects in tutors and resident intern specialists. New studies are needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of abbreviated training programs.


Subject(s)
Empathy , Mindfulness , Community Medicine , Humans , Reference Standards , Spain , Specialization
6.
Recenti Prog Med ; 112(3): 207-215, 2021 03.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123709

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The recent lockdown, resulting from the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, has had a strong social and psychological impact on the most fragile individuals and family structures. In the present work we investigated the experience of families without specific elements of social or health vulnerability during the quarantine period that occurred in the spring of 2020. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between May and July 2020, 22 primary care pediatricians belonging to AUSL Romagna administered to a number of families a questionnaire to detect changes that occurred, during the lockdown, in family environment, school attendance and personal attitudes. RESULTS: A total of 721 questionnaires were collected, analyzing the associations between variables relating to home environment, daily rhythms, school and warning signs in relation to the age of children. As a result of the lockdown, family habits changed in 31% of cases, with a greater presence of the reference figure in 68% of these. Three out of four families reported they had sufficient domestic spaces, and nine out of ten had access to an outdoor, private or condominium space. Daily rhythms were preserved in 56.7% of cases; mood disorders appeared in 30% of adolescent children, followed by sleep, appetite and psychosomatic disorders. One in three children has made progress in terms of evolution and behavior, and one in 5 children has seen their relationships improve. The overall resilience of families during the lockdown period was considered good in 66.3%, sufficient in 31.3% and not satisfactory in only 2.4% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that, in the interviewed families, the simultaneous presence of adults and children at home has generally intensified. Families refer, on the whole, a positive and resilient behavior in the lockdown period, even if initial emotional problems are reported in one out of three children-adolescents. The ability to maintain a family organized structure seems to be partially compromised. Forced cohabitation leads to competition for the same resources of time and space and affects the entire family unit. The school institution emerges as a protective factor for children, young people and also for the well-being of families themselves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Community Medicine , Family Relations/psychology , Pandemics , Pediatricians , Psychology, Adolescent , Psychology, Child , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Attitude , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Crowding/psychology , Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/etiology , Female , Health Care Surveys , Housing , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Mood Disorders/etiology , Parents/psychology , Psychophysiologic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychophysiologic Disorders/etiology , Schools , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
7.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e041641, 2020 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004168

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has certainly resulted in an increased level of anxiety and fear in communities in terms of disease management and infection spread. Due to fear and social stigma linked with COVID-19, many individuals in the community hide their disease and do not access healthcare facilities in a timely manner. In addition, with the widespread use of social media, rumours, myths and inaccurate information about the virus are spreading rapidly, leading to intensified irritability, fearfulness, insomnia, oppositional behaviours and somatic complaints. Considering the relevance of all these factors, we aim to explore the perceptions and attitudes of community members towards COVID-19 and its impact on their daily lives and mental well-being. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This formative research will employ an exploratory qualitative research design using semistructured interviews and a purposive sampling approach. The data collection methods for this formative research will include indepth interviews with community members. The study will be conducted in the Karimabad Federal B Area and in the Garden (East and West) community settings in Karachi, Pakistan. The community members of these areas have been selected purposively for the interview. Study data will be analysed thematically using NVivo V.12 Plus software. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval for this study has been obtained from the Aga Khan University Ethical Review Committee (2020-4825-10599). The results of the study will be disseminated to the scientific community and to the research subjects participating in the study. The findings will help us explore the perceptions and attitudes of different community members towards the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on their daily lives and mental well-being.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Social Perception/psychology , Social Stigma , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Community Medicine/methods , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/trends , Middle Aged , Pakistan/epidemiology , Population Surveillance , Qualitative Research , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL