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1.
Public Health Rep ; 137(2): 352-361, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622163

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to assess an intervention that was created by a community-academic partnership to address COVID-19 health inequities. We evaluated a community-engaged bidirectional pandemic crisis and emergency risk communication (CERC) framework with immigrant and refugee populations during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A 17-year community-engaged research partnership adopted a CERC framework in March 2020 to address COVID-19 prevention, testing, and socioeconomic impacts with immigrant and refugee groups in southeast Minnesota. The partnership used bidirectional communication between communication leaders and their social networks to refine messages, leverage resources, and advise policy makers. We conducted a mixed-methods evaluation for intervention acceptability, feasibility, reach, adaptation, and sustainability through multisource data, including email communications, work group notes, semistructured interviews, and focus groups. RESULTS: The intervention reached at least 39 000 people in 9 months. It was implemented as intended and perceived efficacy was high. Frequent communication between community and academic partners allowed the team to respond rapidly to concerns and facilitated connection of community members to resources. Framework implementation also led to systems and policy changes to meet the needs of immigrant and refugee populations. CONCLUSIONS: Community-engaged CERC is feasible and sustainable and can reduce COVID-19 disparities through shared creation and dissemination of public health messages, enhanced connection to existing resources, and incorporation of community perspectives in regional pandemic mitigation policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Community Participation/methods , Community-Based Participatory Research/organization & administration , Emigrants and Immigrants , Health Communication/methods , Program Evaluation , Refugees , Humans , Minnesota , SARS-CoV-2
2.
rev. colomb. cienc. soc ; 12(2): 778-804, 2021.
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1573042

ABSTRACT

El objetivo de este trabajo fue realizar una aproximación conceptual y análisis de prácticas que permitan problematizar la inclusión de estrategias comunitarias en abordajes integrales de salud mental. Desde una perspectiva cualitativa, este escrito es producto de un proceso de articulación conceptual y sistematización derivado de un análisis reflexivo sobre prácticas de salud mental desarrolladas en el primer nivel de atención en la ciudad y provincia de Buenos Aires desde el año 2010. Se reconoce la fragilización de redes comunitarias como una problemática colectiva en salud mental, y se propone a la promoción en salud mental como estrategia central que permite, desde una perceptiva no normativa e integral, el desarrollo de acciones participativas y el fortalecimiento de lazos comunitarios solidarios como recursos colectivos para el cuidado de la salud mental. Se abordan ejes problemáticos relevados en la implementación de dichas prácticas y su relación con una vigente tensión entre los modelos biomédico e integral de atención. Se articulan reflexiones relacionadas a la pandemia por COVID-19, evidenciando una necesidad actual de profundizar el desarrollo de estrategias comunitarias en salud mental.


The objective of this work was to carry out a conceptual approach and analysis of practices that allow problematizing the inclusion of community strategies in comprehensive mental health approaches. From a qualitative perspective, this paper is the result of a process of conceptual articulation and systematization derived from a reflexive analysis of mental health practices developed in the first level of care in the City and Province of Buenos Aires since 2010. The fragilization of community networks is recognized as a collective mental health problem, and mental health promotion is proposed as a central strategy that allows, from a non-normative and comprehensive perspective, the development of participatory actions and the strengthening of supportive community bonds, as collective resources for mental health care. It addresses problematic axes revealed in the implementation of such practices and their relationship with a current tension between the biomedical and integral models of care. Reflections related to the COVID-19 pandemic are articulated, evidencing a current need to deepen the development of community strategies in mental health.


Subject(s)
Humans , Patients/psychology , Psychology, Social , Community Participation/methods , Patient Care
3.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(5): 368-369, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298398
5.
J Health Commun ; 25(10): 827-830, 2020 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236160

ABSTRACT

In an era of Freddie Gray and Black Lives Matter, a long history of structural racism, combined with disproportionate rates of COVID-19, the African American community has seen a lot of reasons to demand social justice, equal treatment and immediate access to solutions to health disparities. Despite the promise of COVID-19 vaccines, the community is highly distrustful of the vaccine and institutions given a history of mistreatment and many other current concerns. Trusted messengers such as Black pastors are crucial to protecting the community that faces a disproportionate amount of disease. We present a framework to build trust and acceptance including understanding history and context; listening and empathy; engaging pastors as trusted messengers; creating partnerships with shared responsibility and power; and co-creation of solutions with faith leaders and their community, governments and institutions to create sustainable, long-term change. Efforts to support vaccine acceptance must be customized to the variety of needs and realities of the African American community, not just the topic of concern to the institution. Evaluations are needed to help ensure the community is engaged and feeling heard. Pastors and other religious leaders can work with government and institutions to bring information, facilitate discussion, build trust and develop measurable improvement efforts. Although acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines may not be achieved overnight, the process of focusing on issues that are important to the community is an important step in laying the foundation for both COVID-19 vaccines and future interventions.


Subject(s)
African Americans/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Clergy , Community Participation/methods , Health Status Disparities , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , African Americans/education , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Health Communication/methods , Humans , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Racism , Trust
6.
Health Secur ; 19(1): 13-20, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165304

ABSTRACT

Risk communication and community engagement are critical elements of epidemic response. Despite progress made in this area, few examples of regional feedback mechanisms in Africa provide information on community concerns and perceptions in real time. To enable humanitarian responders to move beyond disseminating messages, work in partnership with communities, listen to their ideas, identify community-led solutions, and support implementation of solutions systems need to be in place for documenting, analyzing, and acting on community feedback. This article describes how the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and its national societies in sub-Saharan Africa have worked to establish and strengthen systems to ensure local intelligence and community insights inform operational decision making. As part of the COVID-19 response, a system was set up to collect, compile, and analyze unstructured community feedback from across the region. We describe how this system was set up based on a system piloted in the response to Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which tools were adapted and shared across the region, and how the information gathered was used to shape and adapt the response of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and the broader humanitarian response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Participation/methods , Feedback , Red Cross , Africa South of the Sahara , Communication , Decision Making, Organizational , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Nutr Educ Behav ; 53(1): 75-78, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059744

ABSTRACT

Brighter Bites is a school-based health promotion program that delivers fresh produce and nutrition education to low-income children and their families across 6 locations in the US. This article provides a perspective on how, despite coronavirus disease 2019-related school closures, Brighter Bites pivoted rapidly to collaborate with medical and public health institutions to improve health and food literacy among their families. Through these partnerships, Brighter Bites was able to rapidly provide accurate, evidence-based information related to coronavirus disease 2019 and other social needs, including food, housing, transportation, and access to health care, to help fill a needed gap in vulnerable communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Food Assistance , Health Education/methods , Health Literacy/methods , Health Promotion/methods , School Health Services , Community Participation/methods , Fruit , Humans , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vegetables
9.
Tunis Med ; 98(10): 657-663, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1040299

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compile the lessons learned in the Greater Maghreb, during the first six months of the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, in the field of "capacity building" of community resilience. METHODS: An expert consultation was conducted during the first week of May 2020, using the "Delphi" technique. An email was sent requesting the formulation of a lesson, in the form of a "Public Health" good practice recommendation. The final text of the lessons was finalized by the group coordinator and validated by the signatories of the manuscript. RESULTS: A list of five lessons of resilience has been deduced and approved : 1. Elaboration of "white plans" for epidemic management; 2. Training in epidemic management; 3. Uniqueness of the health system command; 4. Mobilization of retirees and volunteers; 5. Revision of the map sanitary. CONCLUSION: Based on the evaluation of the performance of the Maghreb fight against COVID-19, characterized by low resilience, this list of lessons could constitute a roadmap for the reform of Maghreb health systems, towards more performance to manage possible waves of COVID-19 or new emerging diseases with epidemic tendency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Health Care Reform , Africa, Northern/epidemiology , Algeria/epidemiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Civil Defense/methods , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Civil Defense/standards , Community Participation/methods , Conflict of Interest , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Delphi Technique , Expert Testimony , Global Health/standards , Health Care Reform/organization & administration , Health Care Reform/standards , Hospital Bed Capacity/standards , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mauritania/epidemiology , National Health Programs/organization & administration , National Health Programs/standards , Pandemics , Public Health/methods , Public Health/standards , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tunisia/epidemiology
11.
Afr Health Sci ; 20(3): 1164-1165, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000472

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objective of the article is to understand the need and importance of risk communication and community engagement in containing the COVID-19 outbreak. INTRODUCTION: The Corona Virus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, which has been designated as a public health emergency of international concern has created a sense of fear and apprehension among the community across the world. METHODS: Acknowledging all these alarming facts, we cannot deny that we have to intensify our efforts and all the national policy makers should recognize the infection as of utmost public health priority and be prepared to respond to the potential outbreak within their own boundaries. RESULTS: Based on the earlier outbreaks of the infectious diseases in the current decades, risk communication and community engagement have been identified as one of the crucial and integral elements of a successful response to the public health emergencies. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, risk communication and community engagement are an essential and challenging aspects of the containment of the COVID-19 outbreak and thus we have to try our best to establish a better system to ensure that risk communication is well in place and utilized effectively to engage the community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communication , Community Participation/methods , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Risk , Health Promotion/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Healthc (Amst) ; 9(1): 100495, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966583

ABSTRACT

The United States currently has one of the highest numbers of cumulative COVID-19 cases globally, and Latino and Black communities have been disproportionately affected. Understanding the community-level factors that contribute to disparities in COVID-19 case and death rates is critical to developing public health and policy strategies. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of U.S. counties and found that a 10% point increase in the Black population was associated with 324.7 additional COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population and 14.5 additional COVID-19 deaths per 100,000. In addition, we found that a 10% point increase in the Latino population was associated with 293.5 additional COVID-19 cases per 100,000 and 7.6 additional COVID-19 deaths per 100,000. Independent predictors of higher COVID-19 case rates included average household size, the share of individuals with less than a high school diploma, and the percentage of foreign-born non-citizens. In addition, average household size, the share of individuals with less than a high school diploma, and the proportion of workers that commute using public transportation independently predicted higher COVID-19 death rates within a community. After adjustment for these variables, the association between the Latino population and COVID-19 cases and deaths was attenuated while the association between the Black population and COVID-19 cases and deaths largely persisted. Policy efforts must seek to address the drivers identified in this study in order to mitigate disparities in COVID-19 cases and deaths across minority communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Community Participation/methods , Mortality/ethnology , /statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Community Participation/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mortality/trends , United States/epidemiology , United States/ethnology
13.
Healthc Q ; 23(3): 15-23, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948241

ABSTRACT

The East Toronto Health Partners (ETHP) include more than 50 organizations working collaboratively to create an integrated system of care in the east end of Toronto. This existing partnership proved invaluable as a platform for a rapid, coordinated local response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Months after the first wave of the pandemic began, with the daily numbers of COVID-19 cases finally starting to decline, leaders from ETHP provided preliminary reflections on two critical questions: (1) How were existing integration efforts leveraged to mobilize a response during the COVID-19 crisis? and (2) How can the response to the initial wave of COVID-19 be leveraged to further accelerate integration and better address subsequent waves and system improvements once the pandemic abates?


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Community Participation , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Policy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Community Participation/methods , Decision Making, Organizational , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/methods , Global Health , Humans , Ontario , Organizational Innovation , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Public Health Administration/methods , Resource Allocation/methods , Resource Allocation/organization & administration
14.
Healthc Q ; 23(3): 29-33, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948239

ABSTRACT

Recent data from across the globe show that COVID-19 is disproportionately affecting those who are already adversely impacted by social determinants of health. In this paper, we explore how members of the Alliance for Healthier Communities - comprehensive, salary-based primary care organizations in Ontario - anticipated the same and rapidly responded by adapting their services to ensure continued equitable access to primary care services. Lessons from this project could be adapted in other primary care team-based models or partnerships to ensure ongoing support for populations that are most at risk from COVID-19 and the consequences of restricted access to services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Equity , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Participation/methods , Health Equity/organization & administration , Health Promotion/methods , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Needs Assessment , Ontario , Primary Health Care/methods , Systems Analysis
15.
Am J Public Health ; 110(11): 1678-1686, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902177

ABSTRACT

The US public health community has demonstrated increasing awareness of rural health disparities in the past several years. Although current interest is high, the topic is not new, and some of the earliest public health literature includes reports on infectious disease and sanitation in rural places. Continuing through the first third of the 20th century, dozens of articles documented rural disparities in infant and maternal mortality, sanitation and water safety, health care access, and among Black, Indigenous, and People of Color communities. Current rural research reveals similar challenges, and strategies suggested for addressing rural-urban health disparities 100 years ago resonate today. This article examines rural public health literature from a century ago and its connections to contemporary rural health disparities. We describe parallels between current and historical rural public health challenges and discuss how strategies proposed in the early 20th century may inform current policy and practice. As we explore the new frontier of rural public health, it is critical to consider enduring rural challenges and how to ensure that proposed solutions translate into actual health improvements. (Am J Public Health. 2020;110:1678-1686. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305868).


Subject(s)
Public Health/history , Rural Health/history , Child Health/history , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Community Participation/history , Community Participation/methods , Health Planning/history , Health Planning/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/history , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Status Disparities , History, 20th Century , Humans , Maternal Health/history , Nurses, Public Health/history , Nurses, Public Health/organization & administration , Politics
17.
Am J Med Qual ; 36(1): 17-21, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760468

ABSTRACT

The authors developed a process to produce a reliably fitting face mask from materials that were immediately available to health care workers, to reduce the risk of infection. Multiple materials and designs were developed to produce face masks that focused on ease of production, the ability to generate a reliable facial seal, and the ability to tailor the mask for those who did not fit commercially available N95 masks. Two final designs were selected. Mask components were assembled into kits and distributed to community sewists. Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles were developed for quality improvement. A process was successfully developed to produce 5000 face masks in a period of 3 weeks that fit almost all (95%) health care workers who did not fit in a commercially available mask. The process was able to produce quality face masks with specific attention paid to developing masks that would pass qualitative fit testing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Community Participation/methods , Masks/supply & distribution , Humans , Masks/standards
18.
QJM ; 113(10): 717-719, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706429

ABSTRACT

Societies are organizing themselves to keep the COVID-19 virus at bay for the foreseeable future. The World Health Organization (WHO) has proposed that every country implement a comprehensive set of measures to prevent infection, detect cases, interrupt transmission, control clusters, suppress outbreaks and reduce mortality. Throughout the world, four systems capabilities are emerging that are important for societies to get ahead of the virus and become COVID-19 ready. First: understand the pattern of infection locally and act on it effectively: assess the status of the outbreak; act rapidly and robustly to interrupt transmission. Second: enable people to be active participants in their own responses. Third: focus on the places where people are most at risk of infection. Fourth: assess the performance of responses to COVID-19 infection: detecting cases, interrupting chains of transmission, minimizing adverse consequences, protecting the most vulnerable and ensuring opportunities for sustainable livelihoods and well-being for all, leaving no-one behind. These four capabilities are being woven together within societies: successful weaving can be helped through focusing on three interlinked elements: making information available; assessing and reducing risk; and being able to suppress outbreaks rapidly. This means involving everyone in the response and having strong public health defences. Governments, authorities, public health teams, employers and community organizations make it possible for us to stay safe but, in the end, what happens is up to all of us, individually and collectively. If we are to live well with the threat of COVID-19, solidarity really does matter.


Subject(s)
Civil Defense/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Global Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Public Health , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Community Participation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Global Health/standards , Global Health/trends , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Public Health/ethics , Public Health/methods , Public Health/trends , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Responsibility
20.
Cad. Saúde Pública (Online) ; 36(6): e00115020, 2020.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-635097

ABSTRACT

Resumo: Esta comunicação é centrada na nossa pesquisa e intervenção em promoção da saúde com pacientes e comunidades afetadas por diversas doenças infecciosas, no projeto Plataforma de Saberes. Esse projeto é desenvolvido no Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, e promove o envolvimento continuado de pesquisadores e profissionais de saúde na produção colaborativa de conhecimento sobre saúde com pacientes e grupos comunitários, e na sua capacitação como promotores de saúde comunitária. Face ao novo cenário epidêmico, surgiu a demanda de um espaço de diálogo e partilha de conhecimento sobre prevenção da transmissão da COVID-19. Devido à interrupção das atividades regulares do Plataforma de Saberes, foi promovida uma estratégia que servisse de elo integrador entre ciência e sociedade e ajudasse a superar o isolamento social imposto pela pandemia da COVID-19. O grupo de WhatsApp possibilitou aos integrantes do projeto participarem por meio de formulação de perguntas (áudio) sobre a COVID-19, por intermédio da mediação dos líderes de grupos comunitários. Os principais questionamentos dos participantes estão relacionados com fatores de risco; formas de transmissão; imunidade ao novo vírus; cuidados relacionados à prevenção, sintomas e tratamento; COVID-19 e vacina da influenza. O material educativo Cuidar em tempos da COVID-19 foi produzido e compartilhado com os líderes comunitários e disponibilizado aos respectivos grupos, e veio a ser disseminado nas suas comunidades como resposta a uma demanda de conhecimento que responde às preocupações vividas pelos que já se encontram em situação de vulnerabilidade estrutural.


Resumen: Esta comunicación se centra en nuestra investigación e intervención en la promoción de la salud con pacientes y comunidades afectadas por diversas enfermedades infecciosas, en el proyecto Plataforma de Saberes. Este proyecto está desarrollado en el Instituto Nacional de Infectología Evandro Chagas/Fundación Oswaldo Cruz, en Río de Janeiro, Brasil, y promueve la implicación continuada de investigadores y profesionales de salud en la producción colaborativa de conocimiento sobre salud con pacientes y grupos comunitarios, y en su capacitación como promotores de salud comunitaria. Frente al nuevo escenario epidémico, surgió la demanda de un espacio de diálogo e intercambio de conocimiento sobre la prevención de la transmisión de la COVID-19. Debido a la interrupción de las actividades regulares de la Plataforma de Saberes, se promovió una estrategia que sirviese de vínculo integrador entre ciencia y sociedad y ayudase a superar el aislamiento social impuesto por la pandemia de la COVID-19. El grupo de WhatsApp posibilitó a los integrantes del proyecto, que participaran mediante la formulación de preguntas (audio) sobre la COVID-19, a través de la mediación de los líderes de grupos comunitarios. Los principales cuestionamientos de los participantes se relacionaron con factores de riesgo; formas de transmisión; inmunidad ante el nuevo virus; cuidados relacionados con la prevención, síntomas y tratamiento; COVID-19 y vacuna de la gripe. El material educativo Cuidar em tempos da COVID-19 se produjo y se compartió con los líderes comunitarios y fue puesto a disposición de los respectivos grupos, así como difundido en sus comunidades, en respuesta a una demanda de conocimiento que responde a las preocupaciones vividas por los que ya se encuentran en situación de vulnerabilidad estructural.


Abstract: This paper focuses on our research and intervention in health promotion with patients and communities affected by various infectious diseases, in the project Knowledge-Sharing Platform. This project is developed at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases Evandro Chagas in the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and promotes the continuing involvement of health researchers and professionals in the collaborative production of knowledge on health with patients and community groups and in their training as community health promoters. The new epidemic scenario created the demand for a space of dialogue and knowledge-sharing on the prevention of COVID-19 transmission. Due to the interruption of regular activities in the Knowledge-Sharing Platform, a strategy was launched to serve as a link between science and society and help overcome the social isolation imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. The WhatsApp group allowed project members to participate by addressing questions (audio) on COVID-19 through mediation by community group leaders. The main questions by participants related to risk factors, transmission, immunity to the novel coronavirus, care related to prevention, symptoms, and treatment; and COVID-19 and influenza vaccine. The educational material Caring in the Age of COVID-19 was produced and shared with community leaders and distributed to the respective groups and was eventually shared in their communities as a response to a demand for knowledge that responds to the concerns of people already exposed to structural vulnerability.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Information Dissemination/methods , Vulnerable Populations , Pandemics/prevention & control , Social Media , Betacoronavirus , Health Promotion/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Isolation , Brazil/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Community Participation/methods , Access to Information , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19
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