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1.
J Immunol ; 208(2): 321-327, 2022 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708204

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have demonstrated that 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) exerted key roles in various pulmonary diseases, but the evidence for its role in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) was lacking. The goal of this research was to evaluate the correlations of serum 8-OHdG with the severity and prognosis among patients with CAP through a prospective cohort study. A total of 239 patients with CAP and 239 healthy participants were enrolled. Fasting blood samples were collected. 8-OHdG and inflammatory cytokines were measured by ELISA. On admission, serum 8-OHdG was significantly increased in patients with CAP compared with control subjects. Besides, serum 8-OHdG was incrementally increased in line with CAP severity scores. Pearson correlative analysis found that serum 8-OHdG was correlated with clinical characteristics and inflammatory cytokines in patients with CAP. Linear and logistic regression analysis showed that serum 8-OHdG was positively associated with CAP severity scores. Furthermore, the prognostic outcomes were tracked. Higher serum 8-OHdG on admission increased the risks for intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, vasoactive agent usage, death, and longer hospital stay among patients with CAP. Serum 8-OHdG combination with confusion, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age ≥65 y or pneumonia severity index had stronger predictive powers for death than single 8-OHdG, CAP severity scores, or several inflammatory cytokines in patients with CAP. These results indicated that serum 8-OHdG is positively associated with the severity and poor prognosis in patients with CAP, demonstrating that 8-OHdG may be involved in the pathophysiology process of CAP.


Subject(s)
8-Hydroxy-2'-Deoxyguanosine/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/pathology , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Cytokines/blood , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Pneumonia/pathology , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data
2.
J Int Med Res ; 48(8): 300060520949039, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). METHODS: We analyzed the electronic medical records of 405 hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in the Third Hospital of Wuhan. RESULTS: The patients' median age was 56 years, 54.1% were female, 11.4% had a history of smoking, and 10.6% had a history of drinking. All cases of COVID-19 were community-acquired. Fever (76.8%) and cough (53.3%) were the most common clinical manifestations, and circulatory system diseases were the most common comorbidities. Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 61.2% of the patients, and 2.9% of the patients were asymptomatic. Computed tomography showed ground-glass opacities in most patients (72.6%) and consolidation in 30.9%. Lymphopenia (72.3%) and hypoproteinemia (71.6%) were observed in most patients. About 20% of patients had abnormal liver function. Patients with severe disease had significantly more prominent laboratory abnormalities, including an abnormal lymphocyte count and abnormal C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, D-dimer, and albumin levels. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 causes a variety of severe respiratory illnesses similar to those caused by SARS-CoV-1. Older age, chronic comorbidities, and laboratory abnormalities are associated with disease severity.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/physiology , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , China , Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis , Community-Acquired Infections/pathology , Community-Acquired Infections/virology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/pathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
3.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 10: 322, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-623310

ABSTRACT

Background: Corona virus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious respiratory disease that has spread rapidly across the world. Many studies have already evaluated the clinical features of COVID-19, but how it compares with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-negative community-acquired pneumonia (SN-CAP) is still unclear. Moreover, COVID-19 mortality is correlated with disease severity, but indicators for severity grading have not been specified. We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 in comparison with SN-CAP and find indicators for disease severity in COVID-19. Methods: Patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and SN-CAP were enrolled. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory data were analyzed. Results: The numbers of COVID-19 and SN-CAP patients enrolled were 304 and 138, respectively. The age of the patients was not significantly different between the groups. Compared with SN-CAP, COVID-19 patients had more symptoms of fever and dyspnea; and showed significant difference in blood count results. Computed tomography (CT) imaging of COVID-19 patients showed patchy ground-glass opacities that correlated with disease severity, whereas the CT imaging of SN-CAP patients showed patchy high-density shadows. COVID-19 patients were classified into moderate, severe, and critically severe groups. The severe and critically severe groups had elevated levels of white blood cells (WBC), neutrophils, platelets, C-reaction protein (CRP), lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), troponin-I, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). However, they had decreased levels of lymphocytes, lymphocyte ratio, and albumin. Compared with the younger patients, the older COVID-19 individuals had more chronic diseases and significantly elevated levels of WBC, neutrophil, and CRP levels. Conclusion: SN-CAP showed more inflammatory reaction than COVID-19. Old people with chronic diseases are more susceptible to COVID-19 and have a high likelihood of developing severe and critically severe infection. Levels of WBC, lymphocytes, neutrophils, CRP, NLR, PLR, troponin-I, creatinine, and BUN are important indicators for severity grading in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Bacterial/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Bacterial/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus , Blood Chemical Analysis , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Community-Acquired Infections/mortality , Community-Acquired Infections/pathology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/cytology , Pandemics , Platelet Count , Pneumonia, Bacterial/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
4.
J Clin Pathol ; 73(12): 840-844, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-623167

ABSTRACT

Here, we report the pathological findings of nine complete autopsies of individuals who died in community settings in the UK, three of which were positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), three tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 but are likely false negatives, and three died of other respiratory infections. Autopsy revealed firm, consolidated lungs or lobar pneumonia. Histology of the lungs showed changes of diffuse alveolar damage with fibrin membrane formation, thickened alveolar walls and interstitium with lymphocytic infiltrate, and type 2 pneumocyte hyperplasia with shedding into the alveolar space. This series is the first in the world to describe autopsy findings in individuals dying suddenly in the community, not previously known to have COVID-19 infection, and the first autopsy series in the UK. During a time when testing in the UK is currently primarily offered to patients in hospital or symptomatic key workers, with limited testing available in community settings, it highlights the importance of testing for COVID-19 at autopsy. Two deaths occurred in care homes where a diagnosis of COVID-19 allowed the health protection team to provide support in that 'closed setting' to reduce the risks of onward transmission. This work highlights the need for frequent COVID-19 testing in the management of patients in community settings. Comprehensive virology and microbiology assessment is pivotal to correctly identify the cause of death, including those due to COVID-19 infection, and to derive accurate death statistics.


Subject(s)
Autopsy , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/pathology , Lung/pathology , Myocardium/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis , Community-Acquired Infections/mortality , Community-Acquired Infections/pathology , False Positive Reactions , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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