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1.
Lancet ; 397(10279): 1116-1126, 2021 03 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525995

ABSTRACT

Men who have sex with men (MSM) in the USA were the first population to be identified with AIDS and continue to be at very high risk of HIV acquisition. We did a systematic literature search to identify the factors that explain the reasons for the ongoing epidemic in this population, using a social-ecological perspective. Common features of the HIV epidemic in American MSM include role versatility and biological, individual, and social and structural factors. The high-prevalence networks of some racial and ethnic minority men are further concentrated because of assortative mixing, adverse life experiences (including high rates of incarceration), and avoidant behaviour because of negative interactions with the health-care system. Young MSM have additional risks for HIV because their impulse control is less developed and they are less familiar with serostatus and other risk mitigation discussions. They might benefit from prevention efforts that use digital technologies, which they often use to meet partners and obtain health-related information. Older MSM remain at risk of HIV and are the largest population of US residents with chronic HIV, requiring culturally responsive programmes that address longer-term comorbidities. Transgender MSM are an understudied population, but emerging data suggest that some are at great risk of HIV and require specifically tailored information on HIV prevention. In the current era of pre-exposure prophylaxis and the undetectable equals untransmittable campaign, training of health-care providers to create culturally competent programmes for all MSM is crucial, since the use of antiretrovirals is foundational to optimising HIV care and prevention. Effective control of the HIV epidemic among all American MSM will require scaling up programmes that address their common vulnerabilities, but are sufficiently nuanced to address the specific sociocultural, structural, and behavioural issues of diverse subgroups.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/drug therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , HIV Infections/transmission , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Minority Groups/psychology , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Partners/psychology , Transgender Persons/psychology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
2.
Kardiologiia ; 61(9): 20-32, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in Russian, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527055

ABSTRACT

Aim      To study the effect of regular drug therapy for cardiovascular and other diseases preceding the COVID-19 infection on severity and outcome of COVID-19 based on data of the ACTIVE (Analysis of dynamics of Comorbidities in paTIents who surVived SARS-CoV-2 infEction) registry.Material and methods  The ACTIVE registry was created at the initiative of the Eurasian Association of Therapists. The registry includes 5 808 male and female patients diagnosed with COVID-19 treated in a hospital or at home with a due protection of patients' privacy (data of nasal and throat smears; antibody titer; typical CT imaging features). The register territory included 7 countries: the Russian Federation, the Republic of Armenia, the Republic of Belarus, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, the Republic of Moldova, and the Republic of Uzbekistan. The registry design: a closed, multicenter registry with two nonoverlapping arms (outpatient arm and in-patient arm). The registry scheduled 6 visits, 3 in-person visits during the acute period and 3 virtual visits (telephone calls) at 3, 6, and 12 mos. Patient enrollment started on June 29, 2020 and was completed on October 29, 2020. The registry completion is scheduled for October 29, 2022. The registry ID: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04492384. In this fragment of the study of registry data, the work group analyzed the effect of therapy for comorbidities at baseline on severity and outcomes of the novel coronavirus infection. The study population included only the patients who took their medicines on a regular basis while the comparison population consisted of noncompliant patients (irregular drug intake or not taking drugs at all despite indications for the treatment).Results The analysis of the ACTIVE registry database included 5808 patients. The vast majority of patients with COVID-19 had comorbidities with prevalence of cardiovascular diseases. Medicines used for the treatment of COVID-19 comorbidities influenced the course of the infectious disease in different ways. A lower risk of fatal outcome was associated with the statin treatment in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD); with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI)/angiotensin receptor antagonists and with beta-blockers in patients with IHD, arterial hypertension, chronic heart failure (CHF), and atrial fibrillation; with oral anticoagulants (OAC), primarily direct OAC, clopidogrel/prasugrel/ticagrelor in patients with IHD; with oral antihyperglycemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM); and with long-acting insulins in patients with type 1 DM. A higher risk of fatal outcome was associated with the spironolactone treatment in patients with CHF and with inhaled corticosteroids (iCS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Conclusion      In the epoch of COVID-19 pandemic, a lower risk of severe course of the coronavirus infection was observed for patients with chronic noninfectious comorbidities highly compliant with the base treatment of the comorbidity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Noncommunicable Diseases , Adult , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(8): 544-549, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526211

ABSTRACT

Standard biomarkers have been widely used for COVID-19 diagnosis and prognosis. We hypothesize that thrombogenicity metrics measured by thromboelastography will provide better diagnostic and prognostic utility versus standard biomarkers in COVID-19 positive patients. In this observational prospective study, we included 119 hospitalized COVID-19 positive patients and 15 COVID-19 negative patients. On admission, we measured standard biomarkers and thrombogenicity using a novel thromboelastography assay (TEG-6s). In-hospital all-cause death and thrombotic occurrences (thromboembolism, myocardial infarction and stroke) were recorded. Most COVID-19 patients were African--Americans (68%). COVID-19 patients versus COVID-19 negative patients had higher platelet-fibrin clot strength (P-FCS), fibrin clot strength (FCS) and functional fibrinogen level (FLEV) (P ≤ 0.003 for all). The presence of high TEG-6 s metrics better discriminated COVID-19 positive from negative patients. COVID-19 positive patients with sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score at least 3 had higher P-FCS, FCS and FLEV than patients with scores less than 3 (P ≤ 0.001 for all comparisons). By multivariate analysis, the in-hospital composite endpoint occurrence of death and thrombotic events was independently associated with SOFA score more than 3 [odds ratio (OR) = 2.9, P = 0.03], diabetes (OR = 3.3, P = 0.02) and FCS > 40 mm (OR = 3.4, P = 0.02). This largest observational study suggested the early diagnostic and prognostic utility of thromboelastography to identify COVID-19 and should be considered hypothesis generating. Our results also support the recent FDA guidance regarding the importance of measurement of whole blood viscoelastic properties in COVID-19 patients. Our findings are consistent with the observation of higher hospitalization rates and poorer outcomes for African--Americans with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Early Diagnosis , European Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data , Female , Fibrin/analysis , Fibrin Clot Lysis Time , Fibrinogen/analysis , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperlipidemias/epidemiology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology , Treatment Outcome
4.
Lab Med ; 52(5): 493-498, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526169

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the role of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We included 110 patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Biochemical biomarkers, including MR-proADM, were measured at admission. The association of plasma MR-proADM levels with COVID-19 severity, defined as a requirement for mechanical ventilation or in-hospital mortality, was evaluated. RESULTS: Patients showed increased levels of MR-proADM. In addition, MR-proADM was higher in patients who died during hospitalization than in patients who survived (median, 2.59 nmol/L; interquartile range, 2.3-2.95 vs median, 0.82 nmol/L; interquartile range, 0.57-1.03; P <.0001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed good accuracy of MR-proADM for predicting mortality. A MR-proADM value of 1.73 nmol/L was established as the best cutoff value, with 90% sensitivity and 95% specificity (P <.0001). CONCLUSION: We found that MR-proADM could represent a prognostic biomarker of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adrenomedullin/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hypertension/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Protein Precursors/blood , Aged , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Hypertension/blood , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/virology , Interleukin-6/blood , Lung Diseases/blood , Lung Diseases/mortality , Lung Diseases/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Selection , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Triage/methods
5.
Epidemiol Prev ; 45: In press, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524743

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, specific characteristics of the infected subjects appeared to be associated with a severe disease, leading to hospitalization or death. OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the association between three components of the metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), alone and in combination, and risk of hospitalization in subjects with nasopharyngeal swab-confirmed COVID-19. DESIGN: cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: the study subjects were all COVID-19 cases diagnosed in the area of the Agency for Health Protection of the Metropolitan Area of Milan (Lombardy Region, Northern Italy) between 10.02.2020 and 25.04.2020, whose data were gathered with an ad hoc information system developed at the beginning of the pandemic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: the association between metabolic syndrome components (alone and in combination) and hospitalization (both in any ward and in intensive care unit) was measured by means of cause-specific Cox models with gender, age, and comorbidities as potential confounders. RESULTS: the cohort included 15,162 subjects followed from diagnosis up to 20.07.2020. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of hospitalization in any ward estimated by the Cox model were 1.26 for uncomplicated diabetes mellitus (95%CI 1.18-1.34); 1.21 for complicated diabetes mellitus (95%CI 1.05-1.39); 1.07 for dyslipidaemia (95%CI 1.00-1.14); and 1.11 for hypertension (95%CI 1.05-1.17). When all components coexisted in the same subject, the HR was 1.46 (95%CI 1.31-1.62). A significant increase in risk of hospitalization in intensive care unit was found for uncomplicated diabetes mellitus (HR 1.38; 95%CI 1.15-1.66). CONCLUSIONS: this population-based study confirms that metabolic syndrome components increase the risk of hospitalization for COVID-19. The HR increases in an additive manner when the three components are simultaneously present.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Metabolic Syndrome , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Ophthalmology ; 128(11): 1620-1626, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510165

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Routine use of face masks for patients and physicians during intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections has increased with the emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. This study evaluates the impact of universal face mask use on rates and outcomes of post-injection endophthalmitis (PIE). DESIGN: Retrospective, multicenter, comparative cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Eyes receiving intravitreal anti-VEGF injections from October 1, 2019, to July 31, 2020, at 12 centers. METHODS: Cases were divided into a "no face mask" group if no face masks were worn by the physician or patient during intravitreal injections or a "universal face mask" group if face masks were worn by the physician, ancillary staff, and patient during intravitreal injections. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of endophthalmitis, microbial spectrum, and visual acuity (VA). RESULTS: Of 505 968 intravitreal injections administered in 110 547 eyes, 85 of 294 514 (0.0289%; 1 in 3464 injections) cases of presumed endophthalmitis occurred in the "no face mask" group, and 45 of 211 454 (0.0213%; 1 in 4699) cases occurred in the "universal face mask" group (odds ratio [OR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.51-1.18; P = 0.097). In the "no face mask" group, there were 27 cases (0.0092%; 1 in 10 908 injections) of culture-positive endophthalmitis compared with 9 cases (0.004%; 1 in 23 494) in the "universal face mask" group (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.99; P = 0.041). Three cases of oral flora-associated endophthalmitis occurred in the "no face mask" group (0.001%; 1 in 98 171 injections) compared with 1 (0.0005%; 1 in 211 454) in the "universal face mask" group (P = 0.645). Patients presented a mean (range) 4.9 (1-30) days after the causative injection, and mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) VA at endophthalmitis presentation was 2.04 (~20/2200) for "no face mask" group compared with 1.65 (~20/900) for the "universal face mask" group (P = 0.022), although no difference was observed 3 months after treatment (P = 0.764). CONCLUSIONS: In a large, multicenter, retrospective study, physician and patient face mask use during intravitreal anti-VEGF injections did not alter the risk of presumed acute-onset bacterial endophthalmitis, but there was a reduced rate of culture-positive endophthalmitis. Three months after presentation, there was no difference in VA between the groups.


Subject(s)
Angiogenesis Inhibitors/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Endophthalmitis/prevention & control , Eye Infections, Bacterial/prevention & control , N95 Respirators , Comorbidity , Endophthalmitis/epidemiology , Endophthalmitis/etiology , Eye Infections, Bacterial/epidemiology , Eye Infections, Bacterial/etiology , Follow-Up Studies , Incidence , Intravitreal Injections/adverse effects , Retinal Diseases/drug therapy , Retinal Diseases/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/antagonists & inhibitors
8.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 1136, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504761

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of biometric covariates on risk for adverse outcomes of COVID-19 disease was assessed by numerous observational studies on unstratified cohorts, which show great heterogeneity. However, multilevel evaluations to find possible complex, e.g. non-monotonic multi-variate patterns reflecting mutual interference of parameters are missing. We used a more detailed, computational analysis to investigate the influence of biometric differences on mortality and disease evolution among severely ill COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We analyzed a group of COVID-19 patients requiring Intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. For further analysis, the study group was segmented into six subgroups according to Body mass index (BMI) and age. To link the BMI/age derived subgroups with risk factors, we performed an enrichment analysis of diagnostic parameters and comorbidities. To suppress spurious patterns, multiple segmentations were analyzed and integrated into a consensus score for each analysis step. RESULTS: We analyzed 81 COVID-19 patients, of whom 67 required mechanical ventilation (MV). Mean mortality was 35.8%. We found a complex, non-monotonic interaction between age, BMI and mortality. A subcohort of patients with younger age and intermediate BMI exhibited a strongly reduced mortality risk (p < 0.001), while differences in all other groups were not significant. Univariate impacts of BMI or age on mortality were missing. Comparing MV with non-MV patients, we found an enrichment of baseline CRP, PCT and D-Dimers within the MV group, but not when comparing survivors vs. non-survivors within the MV patient group. CONCLUSIONS: The aim of this study was to get a more detailed insight into the influence of biometric covariates on the outcome of COVID-19 patients with high degree of severity. We found that survival in MV is affected by complex interactions of covariates differing to the reported covariates, which are hidden in generic, non-stratified studies on risk factors. Hence, our study suggests that a detailed, multivariate pattern analysis on larger patient cohorts reflecting the specific disease stages might reveal more specific patterns of risk factors supporting individually adapted treatment strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Clin Microbiol Rev ; 34(3)2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501524

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a rapidly evolving pandemic worldwide with at least 68 million COVID-19-positive cases and a mortality rate of about 2.2%, as of 10 December 2020. About 20% of COVID-19 patients exhibit moderate to severe symptoms. Severe COVID-19 manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with elevated plasma proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin 1ß (IL-1ß), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10/IP10), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), with low levels of interferon type I (IFN-I) in the early stage and elevated levels of IFN-I during the advanced stage of COVID-19. Most of the severe and critically ill COVID-19 patients have had preexisting comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and respiratory diseases. These conditions are known to perturb the levels of cytokines, chemokines, and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), an essential receptor involved in SARS-CoV-2 entry into the host cells. ACE2 downregulation during SARS-CoV-2 infection activates the angiotensin II/angiotensin receptor (AT1R)-mediated hypercytokinemia and hyperinflammatory syndrome. However, several SARS-CoV-2 proteins, including open reading frame 3b (ORF3b), ORF6, ORF7, ORF8, and the nucleocapsid (N) protein, can inhibit IFN type I and II (IFN-I and -II) production. Thus, hyperinflammation, in combination with the lack of IFN responses against SARS-CoV-2 early on during infection, makes the patients succumb rapidly to COVID-19. Therefore, therapeutic approaches involving anti-cytokine/anti-cytokine-signaling and IFN therapy would favor the disease prognosis in COVID-19. This review describes critical host and viral factors underpinning the inflammatory "cytokine storm" induction and IFN antagonism during COVID-19 pathogenesis. Therapeutic approaches to reduce hyperinflammation and their limitations are also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Interferon Type I/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunization, Passive/methods , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/blood , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(41): e27400, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501201

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To depict the clinical characters and prognosis of coronavirus disease 2019 patients who developed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS).A cohort consisted of 526 patients, which including 109 patients complicated MODS, was retrospectively analyzed to examine the clinical characteristics and risk factors of MODS.Among the 526 novel coronavirus-infected pneumonia patients, 109 patients developed multiple organ failure, the incidence rate was 20.7%. Among all 109 patients with MODS, 81.7% were over 60 years old, and 63.3% were male. The most common symptoms were fever (79.8%), dyspnea (73.4%), and fatigue (55.0%). Compared with patients non-MODS patients, there were 70 cases of MODS patients with one or more underlying diseases (64.2% vs 41.0%, P < .001). Respiratory failure (92.7%), circulatory failure (52.0%), and liver function injury (30.9%) were the most common symptoms within the spectrum of MODS. Invasive ventilator, noninvasive ventilator, and high-flow respiratory support treatment for patients in MODS patients were higher than those in the non-MODS group (P < .001). The antiviral therapy and 2 or more antibacterial drug treatments in MODS patients were higher than those in the non-MODS group (P < .001). The median hospital stay of all patients was 16 days (interquartile range [IQR], 9-26), of which 20 days (IQR, 11.5-30.5) in the MODS patients, which was approximately 4 days longer than that of non-MODS patients. In addition, our data suggested that lymphocyte counts <1.0 ∗ 109/L, Troponin T > 0.014 ng/mL and lower oxygenation index were risk factors for MODS. In the early stage of hospital admission, higher inflammatory indexes and lactic acid concentration were associated with increased risk of death.MODS often leads to poor prognosis in coronavirus disease 2019. Our data suggested the importance of early identification of MODS. We recommend close monitoring and timely supportive therapy for patients with high risks, stopping the disease progression before it was too late.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Pandemics , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 7334, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500696

ABSTRACT

To identify the risk factors of mortality for the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) through a retrospective analysis. The demographic, clinical, laboratory, and chest imaging data of patients admitted to the ICU of Huoshenshan Hospital from February 10 to April 10, 2020 were retrospectively analyzed. Student's t-test and Chi-square test were used to compare the continuous and categorical variables, respectively. The logistic regression model was employed to ascertain the risk factors of mortality. This retrospective study involved 123 patients, including 64 dead and 59 survivors. Among them, 57 people were tested for interleukin-6 (IL-6) (20 died and 37 survived). In all included patients, the oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2) was identified as an independent risk factor (odd ratio [OR] = 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.928-0.994, p = 0.021). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.895 (95% CI: 0.826-0.943, p < 0.0001). Among the patients tested for IL-6, the PaO2/FiO2 (OR = 0.955, 95%CI: 0.915-0.996, p = 0.032) and IL-6 (OR = 1.013, 95%CI: 1.001-1.025, p = 0.028) were identified as independent risk factors. The AUC was 0.9 (95% CI: 0.791-0.964, p < 0.0001) for IL-6 and 0.865 (95% CI: 0.748-0.941, p < 0.0001) for PaO2/FiO2. PaO2/FiO2 and IL-6 could potentially serve as independent risk factors for predicting death in COVID-19 patients requiring intensive care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Interleukin-6/analysis , Aged , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Consumption , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
12.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(20): 23459-23470, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498163

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since April 2021, the SARS-CoV-2 (B.1.167) Delta variant has been rampant worldwide. Recently, this variant has spread in Guangzhou, China. Our objective was to characterize the clinical features and risk factors of severe cases of the Delta variant in Guangzhou. METHODS: A total of 144 patients with the Delta variant were enrolled, and the data between the severe and non-severe groups were compared. Logistic regression methods and Cox multivariate regression analysis were used to investigate the risk factors of severe cases. RESULTS: The severity of the Delta variant was 11.1%. Each 1-year increase in age (OR, 1.089; 95% CI, 1.035-1.147; P = 0.001) and each 1-µmol/L increase in total bilirubin (OR, 1.198; 95% CI, 1.021-1.406; P = 0.039) were risk factors for severe cases. Moreover, the risk of progression to severe cases increased 13.444-fold and 3.922-fold when the age was greater than 58.5 years (HR, 13.444; 95% CI, 2.989-60.480; P = 0.001) or the total bilirubin level was greater than 7.23 µmol/L (HR, 3.922; 95% CI, 1.260-12.207; P = 0.018), respectively. CONCLUSION: Older age and elevated total bilirubin were independent risk factors for severe cases of the Delta variant in Guangzhou, especially if the age was greater than 58.5 years or the total bilirubin level was greater than 7.23 µmol/L.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cough/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index
13.
CMAJ ; 193(42): E1619-E1625, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496561

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Between February and June 2021, the initial wild-type strains of SARS-CoV-2 were supplanted in Ontario, Canada, by new variants of concern (VOCs), first those with the N501Y mutation (i.e., Alpha/B1.1.17, Beta/B.1.351 and Gamma/P.1 variants) and then the Delta/B.1.617 variant. The increased transmissibility of these VOCs has been documented, but knowledge about their virulence is limited. We used Ontario's COVID-19 case data to evaluate the virulence of these VOCs compared with non-VOC SARS-CoV-2 strains, as measured by risk of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death. METHODS: We created a retrospective cohort of people in Ontario who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and were screened for VOCs, with dates of test report between Feb. 7 and June 27, 2021. We constructed mixed-effect logistic regression models with hospitalization, ICU admission and death as outcome variables. We adjusted models for age, sex, time, vaccination status, comorbidities and pregnancy status. We included health units as random intercepts. RESULTS: Our cohort included 212 326 people. Compared with non-VOC SARS-CoV-2 strains, the adjusted elevation in risk associated with N501Y-positive variants was 52% (95% confidence interval [CI] 42%-63%) for hospitalization, 89% (95% CI 67%-117%) for ICU admission and 51% (95% CI 30%-78%) for death. Increased risk with the Delta variant was more pronounced at 108% (95% CI 78%-140%) for hospitalization, 235% (95% CI 160%-331%) for ICU admission and 133% (95% CI 54%-231%) for death. INTERPRETATION: The increasing virulence of SARS-CoV-2 VOCs will lead to a considerably larger, and more deadly, pandemic than would have occurred in the absence of the emergence of VOCs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Age Distribution , COVID-19/transmission , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data
14.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(10): e1009360, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496326

ABSTRACT

The spread of infectious diseases such as COVID-19 presents many challenges to healthcare systems and infrastructures across the world, exacerbating inequalities and leaving the world's most vulnerable populations most affected. Given their density and available infrastructure, refugee and internally displaced person (IDP) settlements can be particularly susceptible to disease spread. In this paper we present an agent-based modeling approach to simulating the spread of disease in refugee and IDP settlements under various non-pharmaceutical intervention strategies. The model, based on the June open-source framework, is informed by data on geography, demographics, comorbidities, physical infrastructure and other parameters obtained from real-world observations and previous literature. The development and testing of this approach focuses on the Cox's Bazar refugee settlement in Bangladesh, although our model is designed to be generalizable to other informal settings. Our findings suggest the encouraging self-isolation at home of mild to severe symptomatic patients, as opposed to the isolation of all positive cases in purpose-built isolation and treatment centers, does not increase the risk of secondary infection meaning the centers can be used to provide hospital support to the most intense cases of COVID-19. Secondly we find that mask wearing in all indoor communal areas can be effective at dampening viral spread, even with low mask efficacy and compliance rates. Finally, we model the effects of reopening learning centers in the settlement under various mitigation strategies. For example, a combination of mask wearing in the classroom, halving attendance regularity to enable physical distancing, and better ventilation can almost completely mitigate the increased risk of infection which keeping the learning centers open may cause. These modeling efforts are being incorporated into decision making processes to inform future planning, and further exercises should be carried out in similar geographies to help protect those most vulnerable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Epidemics , Refugees , SARS-CoV-2 , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Comorbidity , Computational Biology , Computer Simulation , Data Visualization , Disease Progression , Humans , Masks , Physical Distancing , Refugees/statistics & numerical data , Schools , Systems Analysis
15.
Int J Psychiatry Med ; 56(4): 240-254, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495823

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the relationship between perceived social support, coping strategies, anxiety, and depression symptoms among hospitalized COVID-19 patients by comparing them with a matched control group in terms of age, gender, and education level. METHOD: The patient group (n = 84) and the healthy controls (HCs, n = 92) filled in the questionnaire including the socio-demographic form, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, Multidimensional Perceived Social Support Scale, and Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced through the online survey link. RESULTS: The COVID-19 patients had higher perceived social support and coping strategies scores than the HCs. However, anxiety and depression scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. In logistic regression analysis performed in COVID-19 patients, the presence of chest CT finding (OR = 4.31; 95% CI = 1.04-17.95) was a risk factor for anxiety and the use of adaptive coping strategies (OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.73-0.99) had a negative association with anxiety. In addition, the use of adaptive coping strategies (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.79-0.98) and high perceived social support (OR = 0.97; 95% CI = 0.93- 0,99) had a negative association with depression symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Longitudinal studies involving the return to normality phase of the COVID-19 pandemic are needed to investigate the effects of factors such as coping strategies and perceived social support that could increase the psychological adjustment and resilience of individuals on anxiety and depression.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Inpatients/psychology , Social Support , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
17.
J Chin Med Assoc ; 84(9): 813-820, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494058

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (coronavirus disease 2019, COVID-19) is a pandemic disease with rapidly and widely disseminating to the world. Based on experiences about the H1N1, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus pandemics, pregnant women who are infected are disproportionately more likely to develop severe illness and need more hospitalizations, intensive care, and finally die of diseases compared with those nonpregnant counterparts or those pregnant women without infection. Although more than one half of pregnant women with COVID-19 are asymptomatic, and as well as their symptoms are frequently mild, this observation presents a further challenge regarding service provision, prevention, and management, in which this may result in overlooking the risk of COVID-19 during pregnancy. As predictable, despite much advance in critical care in recent decades, during the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, pregnant women with COVID-19 are really at higher risk to progress to severe illness; require hospitalization; need intensive care, such as the use of mechanical ventilation as well as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and of most important, die than their nonpregnant counterparts and pregnant women without COVID-19. The magnitude of the risk to pregnant women further extend to their newborn from COVID-19 with resultant significantly increasing perinatal and neonatal morbidity and mortality rates. The heightened risk of untoward outcomes in pregnant women emphasizes an urgent need of national or international recommendations and guidelines to optimize prevention and management strategies for COVID-19 in pregnancy. Active and passive prevention of COVID-19 is approved as effective strategies for women who attempt to be pregnant or during pregnancy. Understanding that pregnant women who are a vulnerable population is essential to improve the care in the novel and urgent COVID-19 pandemic. The current review is a part I to summarize the up-to-date information about the impact of laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnant women and focus on clinical presentations and untoward pregnancy outcomes of these pregnant women infected with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , SARS-CoV-2 , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , Severity of Illness Index
18.
Am J Epidemiol ; 190(11): 2300-2313, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493670

ABSTRACT

To measure disparities in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) hospitalization and intensive care unit (ICU) transfer among racially/ethnically marginalized groups before and after implementation of the California statewide shelter-in-place (SIP) policy, we conducted a retrospective cohort study within a health-care system in California. COVID-19 patients diagnosed from January 1, 2020, to August 31, 2020, were identified from electronic health records. We examined hospitalizations and ICU transfers by race/ethnicity and pandemic period using logistic regression. Among 16,520 people with COVID-19 (mean age = 46.6 (standard deviation, 18.4) years; 54.2% women), during the post-SIP period, patients were on average younger and a larger proportion were Hispanic. In adjusted models, odds of hospitalization were 20% lower post-SIP as compared with the SIP period, yet all non-White groups had higher odds (odds ratios = 1.6-2.1) than non-Hispanic White individuals, regardless of period. Among hospitalized patients, odds of ICU transfer were 33% lower post-SIP than during SIP. Hispanic and Asian patients had higher odds than non-Hispanics. Disparities in hospitalization persisted and ICU risk became more pronounced for Asian and Hispanic patients post-SIP. Policy-makers should consider ways to proactively address racial/ethnic inequities in risk when considering future population-level policy interventions for public health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Continental Population Groups/statistics & numerical data , Health Status Disparities , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , California/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Health Policy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21352, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493207

ABSTRACT

The outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection is determined by multiple factors, including the viral, host genetics, age, and comorbidities. This study investigated the association between prognostic factors and disease outcomes of patients infected by SARS-CoV-2 with multiple S protein mutations. Fifty-one COVID-19 patients were recruited in this study. Whole-genome sequencing of 170 full-genomes of SARS-CoV-2 was conducted with the Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Most patients (47%) had mild symptoms of COVID-19 followed by moderate (19.6%), no symptoms (13.7%), severe (4%), and critical (2%). Mortality was found in 13.7% of the COVID-19 patients. There was a significant difference between the age of hospitalized patients (53.4 ± 18 years) and the age of non-hospitalized patients (34.6 ± 19) (p = 0.001). The patients' hospitalization was strongly associated with hypertension, diabetes, and anticoagulant and were strongly significant with the OR of 17 (95% CI 2-144; p = 0.001), 4.47 (95% CI 1.07-18.58; p = 0.039), and 27.97 (95% CI 1.54-507.13; p = 0.02), respectively; while the patients' mortality was significantly correlated with patients' age, anticoagulant, steroid, and diabetes, with OR of 8.44 (95% CI 1.5-47.49; p = 0.016), 46.8 (95% CI 4.63-472.77; p = 0.001), 15.75 (95% CI 2-123.86; p = 0.009), and 8.5 (95% CI 1.43-50.66; p = 0.019), respectively. This study found the clade: L (2%), GH (84.3%), GR (11.7%), and O (2%). Besides the D614G mutation, we found L5F (18.8%), V213A (18.8%), and S689R (8.3%). No significant association between multiple S protein mutations and the patients' hospitalization or mortality. Multivariate analysis revealed that hypertension and anticoagulant were the significant factors influencing the hospitalization and mortality of patients with COVID-19 with an OR of 17.06 (95% CI 2.02-144.36; p = 0.009) and 46.8 (95% CI 4.63-472.77; p = 0.001), respectively. Moreover, the multiple S protein mutations almost reached a strong association with patients' hospitalization (p = 0.07). We concluded that hypertension and anticoagulant therapy have a significant impact on COVID-19 outcomes. This study also suggests that multiple S protein mutations may impact the COVID-19 outcomes. This further emphasized the significance of monitoring SARS-CoV-2 variants through genomic surveillance, particularly those that may impact the COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods , Hospitalization , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Whole Genome Sequencing/methods , Young Adult
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