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1.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0267315, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883694

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers (HCWs) faced a range of stressors during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, contributing to psychological stress. We use a psychological trauma framework to characterize the mental health burden for clinical and non-clinical healthcare worker occupations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective was to measure and characterize risk factors for trauma and anxiety-related mental health problems among HCWs at a public hospital in the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City (NYC). This study reports findings from a cross-sectional survey of NYC HCWs shortly after the initial 2020 infection surge. Over 800 hospital employees completed the survey that assessed professional quality of life indicators (compassion satisfaction [CS], burnout [BO], secondary traumatic stress [STS]), Coronavirus Anxiety (CS), Obsession with Coronavirus (OC), and PTSD symptoms. The survey also assessed pandemic-related work and life circumstances such as "do you have a family member or friend who tested positive for COVID". Relatively small percentages of HCWs endorsed probable Coronavirus Anxiety (6%), PTSD (13%), and Coronavirus Obsession (21%). We observed higher proportions of Burnout (29%), Moderate or High Secondary Traumatic Stress (45%), and High Compassion Satisfaction (52%). Adjusted regression models showed important implications for prior behavioral/emotional health concerns among HCWs, providing care for a patient that died from COVID-19, and other characteristics. This study supports prior studies documenting the mental health consequences for the healthcare workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study builds on that base by including non-clinical staff in the sample and assessing pandemic life-stressors such as caring for sick family members.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Job Satisfaction , New York City/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , Quality of Life/psychology
2.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(6): 330-333, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879518

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Growing workload demands of nursing faculty has led to an academic work environment that is stressful with loss of work life balance and occupational burnout. METHOD: Full-time faculty were surveyed prior to the pandemic at a private school of nursing using the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL), Bride Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS), Conner-Davidson Resilience-10 (CDRS-10), and Trauma Informed Climate Scale (TICS-10). RESULTS: The ProQOL revealed moderate faculty burnout scores (mean score, 25.8). The STSS identified two thirds of faculty experienced secondary traumatic stress in various degrees, with one third of faculty respondents experiencing high to severe STSS symptoms. The CDRS-10 identified 42% of faculty scored within the lowest quartile and 13% of faculty scored within the highest quartile. CONCLUSION: Faculty must be provided a safe work environment to limit burn-out, promote resilience, and support work life balance to address the current nursing faculty shortage. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(6):330-333.].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Compassion Fatigue , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 26(3): 318-323, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875050

ABSTRACT

Oncology nurses are at risk for compassion fatigue, which is often assessed using the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL). Nursing researchers and leaders use the ProQOL to determine risk for compassion fatigue or effectiveness of interventions to reduce compassion fatigue. However, the ProQOL was designed for social workers, and research has shown it to be less suitable to assess the work of nurses. This article synthesizes a realist review of the literature about instruments measuring nurses' professional quality of life (QOL). The following three themes emerged: (a) a robust body of literature aimed at defining professional QOL, (b) a limited historical context of the ProQOL instrument, and (c) newer instruments. Findings suggest that the ProQOL-21 and the Risk Factors for Compassion Fatigue Inventory are more specific to nursing and better suited to measure nurses' perceived professional QOL.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Compassion Fatigue , Nurses , Empathy , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Quality of Life , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Acta Biomed ; 93(S2): e2022190, 2022 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1848025

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE WORK: During COVID-19 first wave,  healthcare professionals were exposed to a major psychological pressure related to uncertainty, a lack of therapies or a vaccine and shortages of healthcare resources. They developed higher levels of Burnout and  Compassion Fatigue, and similar levels of Compassion Satisfaction. Aim is evaluating in Italian nurses Compassion Satisfaction and Compassion Fatigue and impacting individual and relational variables. METHODS: A multi-methods approach was used. Qualitative data were collected through 2 focus group. Quantitative data were collected through a web survey composed by an ad hoc questionnaire developed from the focus group results, the Professional Quality of Life Scale-5 and the Resilience Scale (RS-14). RESULTS: In the qualitative phase 6 categories emerged. From the quantitative analysis the sample reported a moderate level of Compassion Satisfaction, a low level of Burnout  and a moderate level of Secondary Traumatic Stress. Compassion Satisfaction had as predictors resilience (ß = .501), followed by feeling part of the team (ß = .406) and collaboration with colleagues (ß = .386). Secondary Traumatic Stress had as predictors the impact of PPE (ß = .269), and feeling Covid-related individual sufferance (ß = .212). The only predictor of Burnout was resilience (ß = -2195). Conclusions: During COVID-19 first wave Italian nurses were exposed to a higher risk of Secondary Traumatic Stress, mainly impacted by frustration, loss of control, loss of possibility to properly care for patients, and personal threat. Relational and team support had a crucial role in sustaining Compassion Satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Empathy , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Patient Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , Quality of Life/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Acta Biomed ; 93(S2): e2022150, 2022 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1848021

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Perceived COVID-19-related stigmatizations have a strong impact on healthcare workers' wellbeing and quality of professional life, decreasing satisfaction and increasing fatigue. This work aims to investigate the role of professional identification in moderating the impact of COVID-19-related stigma on quality of professional life in a sample of healthcare professionals working in hospital. METHODS: A cross-sectional design in which a web-based questionnaire was sent to professionals was used to collect answers from 174 participants, most of whom women and nurses. RESULTS: Perceived stigma was negatively related with compassion satisfaction and positively related with an increase in both burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Professional identification had a positive correlation with satisfaction and a negative correlation with burnout, but this was not directly related with secondary traumatic stress. Importantly, stigma and identification interacted so that stigma decreased compassion satisfaction only when identification was low, and increased secondary traumatic stress only when identification was high. No interaction effect appeared with respect to burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Experience of stigmatization has the potential to decrease the quality of professional life of healthcare professionals. Professional identification seems to help professional to maintain higher level of compassion satisfaction and reduced burnout. However, professional identification seems also be associated with vicarious trauma experienced following stigma. (www.actabiomedica.it).


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Empathy , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Quality of Life , Stereotyping , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820262

ABSTRACT

Social workers during the COVID-19 pandemic are at risk due to exposure to varied populations in need, which may impact their resilience, burnout, secondary trauma, and compassion satisfaction. The study assessed resilience at work, burnout, secondary trauma, and compassion satisfaction among social workers in Israel during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (May to June 2020). A convenience sample of 332 social workers (291 women (87.6%)) filled out an online, structured questionnaire that included demographics, a professional quality of life scale (ProQOL) (including three subscales), and resilience at work (RAW) (including seven subscales). The overall mean of the RAW was medium (M = 71, SD ± 8.9) compared to standardized scores. The mean scores of two of the subscales of the RAW, maintaining perspective and staying healthy, were low. The mean scores of the sub-scales of ProQOL were: compassion satisfaction was close to the 50th percentile (M = 48.25); burnout (M = 30.18) and secondary trauma (M = 26.27) were below the 25th percentile. Significant low to medium positive associations were found between all the dependent variables, except for staying healthy. A negative association was identified between compassion satisfaction and burnout, as well as between compassion satisfaction and secondary trauma. High levels of compassion satisfaction and contentment, low levels of secondary trauma, and having a managerial position were predicted to be 40% of the RAW. Lower levels of maintaining perspective, secondary trauma, and being younger predicted 27% of burnout. Higher levels of finding your calling, living authentically, maintaining perspective, interacting cooperatively, being older, and not being a manager predicted 58% of compassion satisfaction. Lower levels of burnout, maintaining perspective, and being younger predicted 36% of secondary trauma. As the COVID-19 pandemic still challenges most societies, policymakers should consider ways to integrate mechanisms that will enhance social workers' resilience at work.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Empathy , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Quality of Life , Social Workers , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(5): 280-285, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806726

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of classical music virtual reality (VR) on burnout, secondary traumatic stress, anxiety, and capacity for developing caring relationships with patients among healthcare workers (HCWs). BACKGROUND: COVID-19 accentuated the importance of promoting the well-being of frontline workers. Efforts to address the mental health needs of HCWs are likely to positively impact patient outcomes. METHODS: Healthcare workers completed 3 sessions of VR. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare premeasure versus postmeasure on the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL), State Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Caring Ability Inventory. Analysis of variance was performed to identify associations between the intervention and differences in scores for each ProQOL domain. Bonferroni correction adjusted for multiple comparisons. Fisher's t test was used for categorical analysis. RESULTS: Seventy-one HCWs completed the study. There was a significant reduction in burnout after the experience, compared with baseline. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that classical music VR may reduce burnout in HCWs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Music , Virtual Reality , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Child , Compassion Fatigue/prevention & control , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Quality of Life
8.
Neuroimage ; 255: 119185, 2022 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778386

ABSTRACT

As characterized by repeated exposure of others' trauma, vicarious traumatization is a common negative psychological reaction during the COVID-19 pandemic and plays a crucial role in the development of general mental distress. This study aims to identify functional connectome that encodes individual variations of pandemic-related vicarious traumatization and reveal the underlying brain-vicarious traumatization mechanism in predicting general distress. The eligible subjects were 105 general university students (60 females, aged from 19 to 27 years) undergoing brain MRI scanning and baseline behavioral tests (October 2019 to January 2020), whom were re-contacted for COVID-related vicarious traumatization measurement (February to April 2020) and follow-up general distress evaluation (March to April 2021). We applied a connectome-based predictive modeling (CPM) approach to identify the functional connectome supporting vicarious traumatization based on a 268-region-parcellation assigned to network memberships. The CPM analyses showed that only the negative network model stably predicted individuals' vicarious traumatization scores (q2 = -0.18, MSE = 617, r [predicted, actual] = 0.18, p = 0.024), with the contributing functional connectivity primarily distributed in the fronto-parietal, default mode, medial frontal, salience, and motor network. Furthermore, mediation analysis revealed that vicarious traumatization mediated the influence of brain functional connectome on general distress. Importantly, our results were independent of baseline family socioeconomic status, other stressful life events and general mental health as well as age, sex and head motion. Our study is the first to provide evidence for the functional neural markers of vicarious traumatization and reveal an underlying neuropsychological pathway to predict distress symptoms in which brain functional connectome affects general distress via vicarious traumatization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Connectome , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Mental Health , Pandemics
9.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(4): 892-900, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741461

ABSTRACT

AIM: To test a model that examines the direct and indirect effects of work-related stress on job-related affective well-being through compassion fatigue. BACKGROUND: Despite the danger of infection, nurses' dedication to their work appears to be an innate desire to provide care for patients with COVID-19. Nonetheless, the universal effort to control the outbreak has led to extended work hours and workload, which has been defined as the primary contributor to work-related stress among nurses and might impact their job-related affective well-being. METHOD: We used a cross-sectional exploratory design. Data were collected using an online survey from 161 nurses working in the Saudi health care system. The survey included obtaining information on demographics and work-related stress using Professional Quality of Life Scale version 5 to measure compassion fatigue as well as a job-related affective well-being scale. RESULTS: Work-related stress had significant negative direct effects on job-related affective well-being and positive effects on compassion fatigue. Compassion fatigue had significantly negative direct effects on job-related affective well-being. Work-related stress exerted negative indirect effects on job-related affective well-being through compassion fatigue, which partially mediated the relationship. CONCLUSION: The findings supported the model and added to our understanding regarding the impact of work-related stress on nurses. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Stress reduction is an important element in improving staff outcomes as well as job-related affective well-being.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/etiology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Empathy , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Pediatr Emerg Care ; 38(3): e1058-e1062, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713811

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The medical profession, with its remarkable physical and emotional demands, predisposes physicians to compassion fatigue (CF) and burnout (BO). Although these conditions have been studied individually, little attention has been paid to how pediatric emergency physicians experience these conditions in the context of an Asian emergency setting especially during a global pandemic In our study, we aim to understand the experiences of individual physicians and describe the potential triggers or protective factors of compassion satisfaction, BO, and compassion satisfaction among physicians in an Asian pediatric emergency department during a pandemic. METHODS: A qualitative, individual interview methodology was used. From March to April 2020, we enrolled 20 physicians involved in frontline care during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the pediatric emergency department to participate. Semistructured interviews were conducted, audiotaped, and transcribed in verbatim, with identifiers removed. Themes were identified, and data were analyzed using qualitative data analysis and iterative data analysis. RESULTS: We recruited 20 physicians. Three themes emerged from data analysis. First, we showed how workplace conditions are protective, including work morale, leadership and management, and social support received. Second, workload affected participants emotionally and in terms of its heavier quantity and longer hours. Finally, intrinsic factors that were protective in developing CF or BO include having professional autonomy, experience, work-life balance, and having emotional resilience to develop self-care. Cultural influences affect emotional regulation and can lead to negative coping with negative peer pressure. In general, participants quantified their levels of satisfaction at work as average to above average. However, they highlighted experiencing greater stress during COVID-19 with the underlying fear of contagion and infection. CONCLUSIONS: Being a pediatric emergency physician puts one at greater risk of experiencing CF and BO because of work and nonwork stressors, especially during a global pandemic, influenced by sociocultural factors. A positive and supportive work environment should be created while providing culturally adapted strategies to improve individual physician resilience to maintain their well-being.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Empathy , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
AACN Adv Crit Care ; 33(2): 134-142, 2022 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706452

ABSTRACT

In caring for patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, nurses are experiencing a crisis of emotional highs and lows that will have lasting implications for their professional and personal well-being. As a result, much attention has been focused on nurse burnout, but the range of nurses' experiences is more nuanced, complicated, and profound. With the recognition that the nursing workforce was already experiencing burnout before the pandemic, this article explores how individuals respond to disasters and the detrimental effects of the repeated surges of critically ill patients, which have led nurses to experience an extended period of disillusionment that includes secondary traumatic stress, cumulative grief, and moral distress. This article describes the range of psychological responses to the COVID-19 pandemic so that nurse leaders can better identify resources and interventions to support nurses.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics
12.
Psychol Trauma ; 14(3): 507-515, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692651

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study examines the relationships between multiple COVID-19 related stressors and experiences of secondary traumatic stress (STS) and burnout (BO). METHOD: This sample (N = 550) of professionals and caregivers from a foster care system in the United States completed an online survey regarding their experiences of COVID-19 related stress in multiple domains (disruptions in routines, income/employment, food access, medical/mental health care access, access to social support, worries about COVID, family conflict/violence, and COVID diagnoses). The survey also included established measures of STS and BO. RESULTS: A subset of COVID-19 stressors was found to account for 27.4% of the variance in STS and 24.7% of the variance in BO scores in regression analyses. Significant correlates for STS included worries about COVID, family conflict/violence and food access, while only worries about COVID and family conflict/violence were significant in the model testing BO. Part of the sample (N = 64) had participated in a related 2019 study of STS and BO and were included in comparison analyses of these conditions before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results for T1 and T2 comparisons yielded significant increases in STS related symptoms of intrusion and alterations in cognitions and mood, with differences in total STS scores trending toward significance. No significant differences were found in BO scores. CONCLUSIONS: These findings and associated implications are discussed for groups of caregivers and helping professionals with preexisting high levels of indirect trauma exposure in a pandemic context. This study provides some guidance on how to identify those at risk for increased distress in their helping roles and considerations for implementing support strategies during a pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
13.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(1): 46-49, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A private university nursing program established the Initiative for Vital Practice in response to increasing levels of compassion fatigue (CF) and burnout among faculty and staff during an undergraduate program revision and accompanying leadership transitions. METHOD: A pilot mixed-method project evaluated self-management practices meant to mitigate CF among faculty and staff. RESULTS: Faculty and staff (N = 34) identified four primary risk factors for CF, including physical symptoms (14 of 34 = 41%); feeling trapped in work (14 of 34 = 41%); lacking time away from work (11 of 34 = 32%); and inability to work hard enough (10 of 34 = 29%). Individual and organizational stressors and alleviators were analyzed; aggregate scores for three Professional Quality of Life scales presented at a "moderate level." CONCLUSION: Preliminary results establish a baseline to measure the effect of burnout and secondary stress and guide further development of our organizational framework and initiative. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(1):46-49.].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Compassion Fatigue , Empathy , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Leadership , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Am J Emerg Med ; 52: 99-104, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549622

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aims to determine the secondary traumatic stress (STS), anxiety, and depression levels of the emergency healthcare workers (HCWs) and to identify the factors associated with the mental health of the emergency HCWs. METHODS: This prospective cross-sectional study was performed between April 1 and May 1, 2021. Emergency nurses and auxiliary staff who gave informed consent were included in the study. Participants who answered the questions incompletely were excluded from the study. Demographic information, working and living conditions, STS, anxiety, depression scores, and coping strategies were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 363 HCWs were included in the study. STS was detected in 261 (71.9%) of the participants, anxiety in 148 (40.8%), and depression in 203 (55.9%) participants. Vaccination against COVID-19 was not associated with STS, anxiety, and depression among emergency HCWs (p > 0.05). Having financial difficulties was the most important factor in the development of anxiety, depression, and STS (OR: 3.68 (95% CI 1.96-6.90), p < 0.001; OR: 4.36 (95% CI 2.52-7.53), p < 0.001; OR: 5.35 (95% CI 3.06-9.37), p < 0.001, respectively). We found significantly reduced levels of STS, anxiety, and depression among participants reporting coping strategies that engaging in hobbies, healthy nutrition, and reading books. CONCLUSION: High levels of STS, anxiety, and depression were determined among emergency nurses and auxiliary staff during the pandemic. Poor job satisfaction and financial difficulties were associated with the mental health of emergency HCWs. The mental health of the emergency HCWs should be evaluated regularly. In addition to professional psychological support, social and financial support should be provided as well.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/etiology , Depression/etiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Psychosocial Support Systems , Recreation , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
16.
Sch Psychol ; 36(6): 504-515, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514397

ABSTRACT

Guided by the job demands-resources model and social-cognitive theory, we examined how educator perceived school connectedness and their attempts to connect with school members (i.e., administrators, staff, students, and families) concurrently and interactively influenced educators' compassion fatigue and online teaching self-efficacy during distance learning in the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Participants were 321 educators in a large, urban school district in northern California. Results of linear regression modeling suggested that educators with longer years of working in education and White educators reported higher levels of compassion fatigue than their counterparts. White educators also reported a lower level of online teaching self-efficacy than their counterparts. With the control of educators' gender, race/ethnicity, and years of teaching in education, educators' self-reported school connectedness is negatively associated with compassion fatigue. Educators' attempts to connect with students not only positively associated with compassion fatigue but also intensified the negative association between school connectedness and compassion fatigue. Moreover, educators' school connectedness and attempts to connect with administrators and staff both positively associated with online teaching self-efficacy. Also, educators' attempts to connect with families mitigated the positive association between school connectedness and online teaching self-efficacy. The findings highlight the importance of promoting educators' school connectedness in improving educators' occupational wellbeing. It also highlights that educators' school connectedness and their attempts to connect with certain group of school members mutually and interactively influence educators' compassion fatigue and online teaching self-efficacy. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Efficacy
17.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259658, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503743

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate nurses' behavioral intention toward caring for COVID-19 patients on mechanical ventilation, as well as the factors affecting their intention. BACKGROUND: COVID-19 patients undergoing mechanical ventilation have many care needs and pose more challenges for nurses, which might adversely affect nurses' intention toward caring behavior. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted by using simple random sampling to recruit 598 nurses from five tertiary hospitals in Sichuan Province, China. The participants responded to an online questionnaire that included questions on demographic characteristics; the Attitude, Subjective Norms, and Behavioral Intention of Nurses toward Mechanically Ventilated Patients (ASIMP) questionnaire; the Nursing Professional Identity Scale (NPIS); and the Compassion Fatigue-Short Scale (CF-Short Scale). ANOVA, Spearman correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression were performed to analyze the data. RESULTS: The mean total behavioral intention score was 179.46 (± 14.83) out of a total score of 189.00, which represented a high level of intention toward caring for patients on mechanical ventilation. Multiple linear regression revealed that subjective norms (ß = 0.390, P<0.001), perceived behavioral control (ß = 0.149, P<0.001), professional identity (ß = 0.101, P = 0.009), and compassion fatigue (ß = 0.088 P = 0.024) were significant predictors of nurses' behavioral intention. CONCLUSIONS: Most nurses have a positive behavioral intention to care for COVID-19 patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. The findings in this study provide some insight for developing effective and tailored strategies to promote nurses' behavioral intention toward caring for ventilated patients under the pandemic situation.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/therapy , Nurses , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Adult , Behavior , China/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Pandemics , Regression Analysis , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
18.
J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci ; 60(6): 646-654, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498362

ABSTRACT

Compassion Fatigue (CF) is commonly observed in professions associated with human and animal care. The COVID-19 pandemic compelled laboratory animal research institutions to implement new work practices in order to maintain essential animal care operations. These modifications ranged from shift changes to last-resort measures, such as culling animal colonies, to accommodate reduced staffing. Such changes could cause personnel to experience increased stress, isolation, and helplessness-all of which can increase CF risk. In the current study, 200 persons involved with animal research completed an online survey to gauge whether CF among laboratory animal personnel had increased during the pandemic. The survey examined professional quality of life, self-assessed levels of CF, institutional changes, perceived changes in animal welfare, and institutional measures intended to alleviate CF. A total of 86% of participants had experienced CF at some point in their career, with 41% experiencing a CF event (new or worsening symptoms of CF) during the pandemic. In addition, 90% of participants who reported a CF event also reported subsequent effects on their personal or professional lives. Health, employment, and animal-related stress that arose due to the pandemic were all found to influence CF scores significantly. Although 96% of respondents were considered essential workers, 67% did not feel as valued for their work as other essential personnel. Furthermore, 88% of personnel responsible for the euthanasia of healthy animals who experienced a CF event reported that CF also affected their personal life, professional life, or both, and 78% responded that interventions from internal CF programs or leadership did not help to alleviate symptoms of CF. The COVID-19 pandemic and resultant institutional changes will likely have lasting effects on persons and organizations. By determining and subsequently mitigating sources of CF, we can better assist the laboratory animal community during future crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Animals , Animals, Laboratory , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257429, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440987

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light the lacunae in the preparedness of healthcare systems across the globe. This preparedness also includes the safety of healthcare providers (HCPs) at various levels. Sudden spread of COVID-19 infection has created threatening and vulnerable conditions for the HCPs. The current pandemic situation has not only affected physical health of HCPs but also their mental health. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to understand the prevalence and severity of secondary traumatic stress, optimism parameters, along with states of mood experienced by the HCPs, viz., doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals (including Physiotherapist, Lab technicians, Phlebotomist, dieticians, administrative staff and clinical pharmacist), during the COVID-19 lockdown in India. METHODOLOGY: The assessment of level of secondary traumatic stress (STS), optimism/pessimism (via Life Orientation Test-Revised) and current mood states experienced by Indian HCPs in the present COVID-19 pandemic situation was done using a primary data of 2,008 HCPs from India during the first lockdown during April-May 2020. Data was collected through snow-ball sampling technique, reaching out to various medical health care professionals through social media platforms. RESULT: Amongst the study sample 88.2% of doctors, 79.2 of nurses and 58.6% of allied HCPs were found to have STS in varying severity. There was a female preponderance in the category of Severe STS. Higher optimism on the LOTR scale was observed among doctors at 39.3% followed by nurses at 26.7% and allied health care professionals 22.8%. The mood visual analogue scale which measures the "mood" during the survey indicated moderate mood states without any gender bias in the study sample. CONCLUSION: The current investigation sheds light on the magnitude of the STSS experienced by the HCPs in the Indian Subcontinent during the pandemic. This hitherto undiagnosed and unaddressed issue, calls for a dire need of creating better and accessible mental health programmes and facilities for the health care providers in India.


Subject(s)
Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Optimism/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256854, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381286

ABSTRACT

Volunteers have played an important role by supporting essential services that have been overwhelmed during the most critical moments of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Hence, nonprofit organizations may be interested in preventing negative consequences of these volunteers' exposure to potentially traumatic events. The aim of this cross-sectional study was twofold. First, to examine to what extent self-compassion and self-determination would contribute to differentiating between volunteers with different levels of compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and post-traumatic growth. Second, to identify the best predictors of the most extreme levels of each outcome. Participants were 211 Spanish Red Cross volunteers (60.7% women), who completed a survey. They were separately classified into three groups (low, medium, and high) according to the 33rd and 66th percentile scores on each outcome (compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and post-traumatic growth). Univariate analyses of variance and post-hoc comparisons revealed that self-compassion and self-determination contributed differently to distinguishing between levels of each outcome. Volunteers lowest in compassion fatigue stood out for showing fewer non-compassionate strategies and more mindfulness than the other groups. Moreover, those higher in satisfaction compassion also showed lower use of unhealthy strategies and higher scores in all other predictive variables. Volunteers highest in post-traumatic growth showed higher self-kindness and satisfaction of all psychological needs. Binary logistic regressions allowed for the identification of predictors of belonging to the most extreme groups. The protective factors may be useful to guide volunteers' self-care and help them thrive in the face of critical service demands.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Volunteers/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Spain/epidemiology
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