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1.
PLoS Med ; 18(12): e1003872, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581903

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The United States (US) Expanded Access Program (EAP) to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) convalescent plasma was initiated in response to the rapid spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of COVID-19. While randomized clinical trials were in various stages of development and enrollment, there was an urgent need for widespread access to potential therapeutic agents. The objective of this study is to report on the demographic, geographical, and chronological characteristics of patients in the EAP, and key safety metrics following transfusion of COVID-19 convalescent plasma. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mayo Clinic served as the central institutional review board for all participating facilities, and any US physician could participate as a local physician-principal investigator. Eligible patients were hospitalized, were aged 18 years or older, and had-or were at risk of progression to-severe or life-threatening COVID-19; eligible patients were enrolled through the EAP central website. Blood collection facilities rapidly implemented programs to collect convalescent plasma for hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Demographic and clinical characteristics of all enrolled patients in the EAP were summarized. Temporal patterns in access to COVID-19 convalescent plasma were investigated by comparing daily and weekly changes in EAP enrollment in response to changes in infection rate at the state level. Geographical analyses on access to convalescent plasma included assessing EAP enrollment in all national hospital referral regions, as well as assessing enrollment in metropolitan areas and less populated areas that did not have access to COVID-19 clinical trials. From April 3 to August 23, 2020, 105,717 hospitalized patients with severe or life-threatening COVID-19 were enrolled in the EAP. The majority of patients were 60 years of age or older (57.8%), were male (58.4%), and had overweight or obesity (83.8%). There was substantial inclusion of minorities and underserved populations: 46.4% of patients were of a race other than white, and 37.2% of patients were of Hispanic ethnicity. Chronologically and geographically, increases in the number of both enrollments and transfusions in the EAP closely followed confirmed infections across all 50 states. Nearly all national hospital referral regions enrolled and transfused patients in the EAP, including both in metropolitan and in less populated areas. The incidence of serious adverse events was objectively low (<1%), and the overall crude 30-day mortality rate was 25.2% (95% CI, 25.0% to 25.5%). This registry study was limited by the observational and pragmatic study design that did not include a control or comparator group; thus, the data should not be used to infer definitive treatment effects. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the EAP provided widespread access to COVID-19 convalescent plasma in all 50 states, including for underserved racial and ethnic minority populations. The study design of the EAP may serve as a model for future efforts when broad access to a treatment is needed in response to an emerging infectious disease. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT#: NCT04338360.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Compassionate Use Trials/methods , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Distribution Systems/organization & administration , Registries , Transfusion Reaction/complications , Transfusion Reaction/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/adverse effects , Immunization, Passive/methods , Inpatients , Male , Medically Underserved Area , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Safety , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , United States
2.
Drug Discov Today ; 26(2): 593-603, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065014

ABSTRACT

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Expanded Access (EA) Program, which allows for compassionate uses of unapproved therapeutics and diagnostics outside of clinical trials, has gained significant traction during the Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. While development of vaccines has been the major focus, uncertainties around new vaccine safety and effectiveness have spawned interest in other pharmacological options. Experimental drugs can also be approved under the FDA Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) program, designed to combat infectious disease and other threats. Here, we review the US experience in 2020 with pharmacological EA and EUA approvals during the pandemic. We also provide a description of, and clinical rationale for, each of the EA- or EUA-approved drugs (e.g. remdesivir, convalescent plasma, propofol 2%, hydroxychloroquine, ruxolitinib, bamlanivimab, baricitinib, casirivimab plus imdevimab) during the pandemic and concluding reflections on the EA program and its potential future uses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Compassionate Use Trials , Antiviral Agents/classification , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Compassionate Use Trials/methods , Compassionate Use Trials/trends , Drug Approval , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
5.
Curr Drug Targets ; 22(13): 1536-1547, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999942

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Early in December 2019, mass sufferers due to Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia (SARS-CoV-2) in Wuhan (China) roused worldwide concern. Hardly any drugs showed the light of hope concerning the depletion in the period of treatment, and virological suppression became ineffective. Furthermore, numerous sufferers have undergone off-label use or compassionate use treatments as well as antiretroviral, antiparasitic agents, anti-inflammatory compounds, and convalescent plasma in either oral/parenteral route. This study aims to compile and analyze the effectiveness of Remdesivir and Hydroxychloroquine and give an insight into their drug profile in the treatment and management of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Relevant literature was searched from PubMed, Crossref, Springer, Bentham Sciences, Google Scholar, DOAJ, ScienceDirect, and MEDLINE by using keywords like COVID-19, SARS-- COV-2, Remdesivir, and Hydroxychloroquine. Appropriate peer-reviewed articles were studied and compiled for this review paper. The figures were prepared by using ChemOffice 2016 (Chem- Draw Professional 2016) and Microsoft Office. RESULTS: This study indicates that 5 out of 10 works of literature find that Remdesivir leads to a reduction in recovery time, and the remaining 5 pieces of literature found Remdesivir to have no variance and have limitations. However, 6 out of 12 articles presented an increased chance of survival or reduction in recovery time due to hydroxychloroquine, while the remaining 6 presented hydroxychloroquine having no effect. CONCLUSION: There is a need to assess more pharmacokinetics and randomized controlled trials (RCT) for Remdesivir and Hydroxychloroquine. Studies should be conducted in different combinations along with Hydroxychloroquine and Remdesivir to obtain better results.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Compassionate Use Trials/methods , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Hydroxychloroquine/metabolism
7.
Clin Microbiol Rev ; 34(1)2020 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962931

ABSTRACT

Patients and physicians worldwide are facing tremendous health care hazards that are caused by the ongoing severe acute respiratory distress syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. Remdesivir (GS-5734) is the first approved treatment for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is a novel nucleoside analog with a broad antiviral activity spectrum among RNA viruses, including ebolavirus (EBOV) and the respiratory pathogens Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), SARS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2. First described in 2016, the drug was derived from an antiviral library of small molecules intended to target emerging pathogenic RNA viruses. In vivo, remdesivir showed therapeutic and prophylactic effects in animal models of EBOV, MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, the substance failed in a clinical trial on ebolavirus disease (EVD), where it was inferior to investigational monoclonal antibodies in an interim analysis. As there was no placebo control in this study, no conclusions on its efficacy in EVD can be made. In contrast, data from a placebo-controlled trial show beneficial effects for patients with COVID-19. Remdesivir reduces the time to recovery of hospitalized patients who require supplemental oxygen and may have a positive impact on mortality outcomes while having a favorable safety profile. Although this is an important milestone in the fight against COVID-19, approval of this drug will not be sufficient to solve the public health issues caused by the ongoing pandemic. Further scientific efforts are needed to evaluate the full potential of nucleoside analogs as treatment or prophylaxis of viral respiratory infections and to develop effective antivirals that are orally bioavailable.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Alanine/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Compassionate Use Trials/methods , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Administration Schedule , Ebolavirus/drug effects , Ebolavirus/growth & development , Ebolavirus/pathogenicity , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/mortality , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/pathology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/virology , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/growth & development , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS Virus/growth & development , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/mortality , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
8.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 20(1): 206, 2020 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical progress of patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 is often associated with severe pneumonia which may require intensive care, invasive ventilation, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The length of intensive care and the duration of these supportive therapies are clinically relevant outcomes. From the statistical perspective, these quantities are challenging to estimate due to episodes being time-dependent and potentially multiple, as well as being determined by the competing, terminal events of discharge alive and death. METHODS: We used multistate models to study COVID-19 patients' time-dependent progress and provide a statistical framework to estimate hazard rates and transition probabilities. These estimates can then be used to quantify average sojourn times of clinically important states such as intensive care and invasive ventilation. We have made two real data sets of COVID-19 patients (n = 24* and n = 53**) and the corresponding statistical code publically available. RESULTS: The expected lengths of intensive care unit (ICU) stay at day 28 for the two cohorts were 15.05* and 19.62** days, while expected durations of mechanical ventilation were 7.97* and 9.85** days. Predicted mortality stood at 51%* and 15%**. Patients mechanically ventilated at the start of the example studies had a longer expected duration of ventilation (12.25*, 14.57** days) compared to patients non-ventilated (4.34*, 1.41** days) after 28 days. Furthermore, initially ventilated patients had a higher risk of death (54%* and 20%** vs. 48%* and 6%**) after 4 weeks. These results are further illustrated in stacked probability plots for the two groups from time zero, as well as for the entire cohort which depicts the predicted proportions of the patients in each state over follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The multistate approach gives important insights into the progress of COVID-19 patients in terms of ventilation duration, length of ICU stay, and mortality. In addition to avoiding frequent pitfalls in survival analysis, the methodology enables active cases to be analyzed by allowing for censoring. The stacked probability plots provide extensive information in a concise manner that can be easily conveyed to decision makers regarding healthcare capacities. Furthermore, clear comparisons can be made among different baseline characteristics.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/therapeutic use , Algorithms , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Compassionate Use Trials/methods , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Care/methods , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Models, Theoretical , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis , Survival Rate , Time Factors
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