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2.
Educ Prim Care ; 33(2): 69-76, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366928

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) are developed to support the practical application of competency frameworks in postgraduate medical education (PGME) programmes. EPAs are used for the assessment of the trainees' competence development, which takes place by means of an entrustment decision, aiming to stimulate learning and independent practice in trainees. In this pilot study, we explore the feasibility and validity of EPA-based assessment in a General Practice (GP) training programme. METHODS: We used questionnaires to evaluate trainers' and trainees' experiences with the use of six EPAs for trainee learning, assessment and independent practice at the Out-of-Hours GP Center. Data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Additionally, we examined the inter-item correlation between scores on EPA-based assessment and competency-based assessment using Spearman's Rho. RESULTS: EPA-based assessment provided opportunities for giving concrete feedback and substantiating competency-based assessment. No consistent correlation between EPA-based assessment and competency-based assessment could be detected. Only later in the course of the training programme a correlation was found between the EPA scores and the degree of independence of trainees. DISCUSSION: Results of this pilot study confirm the theories behind EPAs, as well as earlier research on EPAs in the workplace regarding trainee learning, assessment and independent practice. An important limitation of this study was the COVID-19 pandemic, as it influenced the results through reduced inclusion and follow-up, and through the impact on the workplace and trainee learning possibilities. Further research is needed to determine how EPAs support independent practice of trainees, as well as the assessment of trainee competency development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , Internship and Residency , Clinical Competence , Competency-Based Education/methods , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects
3.
Acad Med ; 96(7S): S6-S8, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286597

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 exposed the reactive nature of the medical education community in response to a disruption that, at one time, may have seemed preposterous. In this article, the author reflected on the impact of an unpredictable plight on a system of medical education that (1) is continuous but doesn't function as a continuum and (2) requires adaptation but is steeped in a fixed mindset and structure that resists change. As a result, innovations which were previously considered impossible, such as time variable education and training, were forced into being. Inspired by the changes brought about by the pandemic, the ensuing decade is explored through a lens of possible futures to envision a path forward based on resilience rather than reactivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Competency-Based Education/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Models, Educational , Organizational Innovation , Competency-Based Education/methods , Creativity , Education, Medical/methods , Humans , Resilience, Psychological , Systems Analysis , United States
4.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1529-1533, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226568

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 crisis has seriously affected academic medical centers (AMCs) on multiple levels. Combined with many trends that were already under way pre pandemic, the current situation has generated significant disruption and underscored the need for change within and across AMCs. In this article, the authors explore some of the major issues and propose actionable solutions in 3 areas of concentration. First, the impact on medical students is considered, particularly the trade-offs associated with online learning and the need to place greater pedagogical emphasis on virtual care delivery and other skills that will be increasingly in demand. Solutions described include greater utilization of technology, building more public health knowledge into the curriculum, and partnering with a wide range of academic disciplines. Second, leadership recruiting, vital to long-term success for AMCs, has been complicated by the crisis. Pressures discussed include adapting to the dynamics of competitive physician labor markets as well as attracting candidates with the skill sets to meet the requirements of a shifting AMC leadership landscape. Solutions proposed in this domain include making search processes more focused and streamlined, prioritizing creativity and flexibility as core management capabilities to be sought, and enhancing efforts with assistance from outside advisors. Finally, attention is devoted to the severe financial impact wrought by the pandemic, creating challenges whose resolution is central to planning future AMC directions. Specific challenges include recovery of lost clinical revenue and cash flow, determining how to deal with research funding, and the precarious economic balancing act engendered by the need to continue distance education. A full embrace of telehealth, collaborative policy-making among the many AMC constituencies, and committing fully to being in the vanguard of the transition to value-based care form the solution set offered.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/psychology , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Students, Medical/psychology , Academic Medical Centers/economics , Biomedical Technology/instrumentation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Competency-Based Education/methods , Creativity , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/economics , Humans , Leadership , Policy Making , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Telemedicine
5.
J Postgrad Med ; 67(1): 18-23, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061064

ABSTRACT

The uncertainty in all spheres of higher education due to the COVID-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on teaching-learning and assessments in medical colleges across the globe. The conventional ways of assessment are now neither possible nor practical for certifying medical graduates. This has necessitated thoughtful considerations in making adjustments to the assessment system, with most institutions transitioning to online assessments that so far have remained underutilized. Programmatic assessment encourages the deliberate and longitudinal use of diverse assessment methods to maximize learning and assessment and at present can be utilized optimally as it ensures the collection of multiple low-stake assessment data which can be aggregated for high-stake pass/fail decisions by making use of every opportunity for formative feedback to improve performance. Though efforts have been made to introduce programmatic assessment in the competency-based undergraduate curriculum, transitioning to online assessment can be a potential opportunity if the basic tenets of programmatic assessment, choice of online assessment tools, strategies, good practices of online assessments and challenges are understood and explored explicitly for designing and implementing online assessments. This paper explores the possibility of introducing online assessment with face-to-face assessment and structuring a blended programmatic assessment in competency-based medical education.


Subject(s)
Competency-Based Education/methods , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Humans , India
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(21)2020 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895363

ABSTRACT

Due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, there are many restrictions in effect in clinical nursing practice. Since effective educational strategies are required to enhance nursing students' competency in clinical practice, this study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of simulation problem-based learning (S-PBL). A quasi-experimental control group pretest-post-test design was used. Nursing students were allocated randomly to the control group (n = 31) and the experimental group (n = 47). Students in the control group participated in a traditional maternity clinical practicum for a week, while students in the experimental group participated S-PBL for a week. The students in the experimental group were trained in small groups using a childbirth patient simulator (Gaumard® Noelle® S554.100, Miami, USA) based on a standardized scenario related to obstetric care. The students' learning attitude, metacognition, and critical thinking were then measured via a self-reported questionnaire. Compared with the control group, the pre-post difference in learning attitude and critical thinking increased significantly (p < 0.01) in the experimental group. S-PBL was found to be an effective strategy for improving nursing students' learning transfer. Thus, S-PBL that reflects various clinical situations is recommended to improve the training in maternal health nursing.


Subject(s)
Competency-Based Education/methods , Metacognition , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Simulation Training/methods , Students, Nursing/psychology , Thinking , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Preceptorship , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Biochem Mol Biol Educ ; 48(6): 670-674, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-866029

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak has shut down universities and prompted the teaching faculty to move to online resources. In view of upcoming of new Medical Council of India (MCI) curriculum and outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic, keeping pace with medical education became a challenge. To keep on par with learning activities of undergraduate students during this period, the teaching faculty adopted the use of online resources. E-learning tools were utilized to engage first-year undergraduate students and satisfy majority of aspects of Competency-Based Undergraduate Medical Curriculum/Education (CBMC/E) in Biochemistry.


Subject(s)
Biochemistry/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Competency-Based Education/methods , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Pandemics , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Clinical Competence , Competency-Based Education/standards , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Educational Measurement , Humans , India/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching Materials
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