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1.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 251, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053897

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Complementary and Integrative Medicine (CIM) is often taken up by individuals seeking relief from different diseases. This study investigates the prevalence and associated factors of CIM use in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: In this telephone-based, cross-sectional study, data on CIM usage were collected from COVID-19 patients from February till June 2020 in Fars province, Iran using a researcher-made checklist. Additionally, we asked about the patients' attitudes toward these treatments. RESULTS: Out of 453 patients diagnosed with COVID-19, 400 (88.30%) responded to our calls and agreed to participate in the study. Among them, 276 patients reported using CIM to treat COVID-19 [prevalence: 69% (95% CI: 64.2 to 73.5)]. The most frequently used herbal medicine among COVID-19 patients was ginger (n = 273, 98.9%), thyme (n = 263, 95.3%), and black cumin (n = 205, 74.3%). Most of these patients were recommended to use herbal medicine by their families and friends (n = 96, 34.8%). Univariable logistic regression revealed that age under 50 years old, residency in urban areas (including the capital of the province and small cities), employment, academic education, and being an outpatient were statistically significant factors resulting in CIM usage. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that CIM use among outpatients was 3.65 times more than among inpatients. In addition, patients under 50 years old used CIM 85% more than older patients. Ultimately, only 9 (3.3%) patients consulted with their doctors regarding these medications. No side effects due to CIM use were reported. CONCLUSION: Many patients with COVID-19 used CIM, but few consulted with their physicians in this regard. Therefore, physicians should ask their patients about CIM usage, and patients should also report their use of CIM therapies during their medical visits. Furthermore, age and hospitalization status affected CIM use among patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Integrative Medicine , Complementary Therapies/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Prevalence
2.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 234, 2022 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009387

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic lockdown has had a profound impact on physical and mental well-being throughout the world. Previous studies have revealed that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequently used for, and can be potential beneficial for strengthening physical mental resilience. The aims of this study were therefore to determine the prevalence and reasons for use of CAM during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic among a representative sample of the Norwegian population, and further determine self-reported effects and adverse effects of the CAM modalities used. METHODS: Computer assisted telephone interviews using a COVID-adapted I-CAM-Q questionnaire were conducted with 1008 randomly selected Norwegians aged 16 and above using multistage sampling during April and May 2020 applying age and sex quotas for each area. Frequencies, Pearson's chi-square tests, Fisher exact tests, and independent sample t-test were used to identify the users of CAM, what they used, why they used it and whether they experienced effect and/or adverse effects of the modalities used, and further to describe differences in sociodemographic factors associated with CAM use. Cronbach's alpha tests were used to test for internal consistency in the different groups of CAM. Significance level was set to p < 0.05. RESULTS: The study revealed that two thirds of the respondents (67%) had used CAM within the first 3 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular CAM modalities that did not involve a provider. Most used were natural remedies and dietary supplement (57%, mainly vitamins and minerals), but self-help practices like yoga and meditation were also widely used (24%). Women used CAM modalities significantly more than men (77% vs. 58%). Most of the respondents found the modalities they used beneficial, and few reported adverse effects of the treatments. CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of the Norwegian population used CAM during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic with high satisfaction and few reported adverse effects. CAM was rarely used to prevent or treat COVID-19, but rather to treat a long-term health condition, and to improve well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Norway/epidemiology , Pandemics
3.
Otolaryngol Clin North Am ; 55(5): 1035-1044, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008015

ABSTRACT

The use of complementary and integrative medicine has increased . It is estimated that one-third of the population of the United States uses some form of alternative medicine. Physicians should consider integrative medicine therapies . Alternative medical therapies for the common cold and influenza include herbal supplements, dietary supplements, diet, and other adjunct therapies. However, it is important to research and study these therapies. Therefore, communication with patients and other health care providers is important. This will ensure effective and positive patient care experiences. Further randomized clinical trials are necessary to further establish the role of various alternative options.


Subject(s)
Common Cold , Complementary Therapies , Influenza, Human , Integrative Medicine , Common Cold/therapy , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Influenza, Human/therapy , United States
4.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 118(10): 179, 2021 03 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383846
5.
J Altern Complement Med ; 27(8): 623-626, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338078
6.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0262703, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938409

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The novel coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) has taken an immense physical, social, and emotional toll on frontline healthcare workers. Research has documented higher levels of anxiety, depression, and burnout among healthcare workers during the pandemic. Thus, creative interventions are needed now more than ever to provide brief, accessible support to frontline workers. Virtual reality is a rapidly growing technology with potential psychological applications. In this study, we piloted a three-minute Tranquil Cinematic-VR simulation of a nature scene to lower subjective stress among frontline healthcare workers in COVID-19 treatment units. We chose to film a nature scene because of the extensive empirical literature documenting the benefits of nature exposure and health. METHODS: A convenience sample of frontline healthcare workers, including direct care providers, indirect care providers, and support or administrative services, were recruited from three COVID-19 units located in the United States. Inclusion criteria for participation included adults aged 18 years and older who could read and speak in English and were currently employed by the healthcare system. Participants viewed a 360-degree video capture of a lush, green nature preserve in an Oculus Go or Pico G2 4K head-mounted display. Prior to viewing the simulation, participants completed a brief demographic questionnaire and the visual analogue scale to rate their subjective stress on a 10-point scale, with 1 = 'Not at all stressed' to 10 = 'Extremely stressed.' We conducted paired t-tests to examine pre- and post-simulation changes in subjective stress as well as Kruskal-Wallis tests and Mann-Whitney U tests to examine differences by demographic variables. All analyses were conducted in SPSS statistical software version 28.0. We defined statistical significance as a p-value less than .05. RESULTS: A total of 102 individuals consented to participate in the study. Eighty-four (82.4%) participants reported providing direct patient care, 73 (71.6%) identified as women, 49 (48.0%) were between the ages of 25-34 years old, and 35 (34.3%) had prior experience with VR. The pre-simulation mean stress score was 5.5±2.2, with a range of 1 to 10. Thirty-three (32.4%) participants met the 6.8 cutoff for high stress pre-simulation. Pre-simulation stress scores did not differ by any demographic variables. Post-simulation, we observed a significant reduction in subjective stress scores from pre- to post-simulation (mean change = -2.2±1.7, t = 12.749, p < .001), with a Cohen's d of 1.08, indicating a very large effect. Further, only four (3.9%) participants met the cutoff for high stress after the simulation. Post-simulations scores did not differ by provider type, age range, gender, or prior experience with virtual reality. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this pilot study suggest that the application of this Tranquil Cinematic-VR simulation was effective in reducing subjective stress among frontline healthcare workers in the short-term. More research is needed to compare the Tranquil Cinematic-VR simulation to a control condition and assess subjective and objective measures of stress over time.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/therapy , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Virtual Reality , Adult , Anxiety , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Complementary Therapies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Young Adult
7.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 295: 366-369, 2022 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1924038

ABSTRACT

In this study, we addressed the alternative medications that have been targeted in the clinical trials (CTs) to be evidenced as an adjuvant treatment against COVID-19. Based on the outcomes from CTs, we found that dietary supplements such as Lactoferrin, and Probiotics (as SivoMixx) can play a role enhancing the immunity thus can be used as prophylactics against COVID-19 infection. Vitamin D was proven as an effective adjuvant treatment against COVID-19, while Vitamin C role is uncertain and needs more investigation. Herbals such as Guduchi Ghan Vati can be used as prophylactic, while Resveratrol can be used to reduce the hospitalization risk of COVID-19 patients. On the contrary, there were no clinical improvements demonstrated when using Cannabidiol. This study is a part of a two-phase research study. In the first phase, we gathered evidence-based information on alternative therapeutics for COVID-19 that are under CT. In the second phase, we plan to build a mobile health application that will provide evidence based alternative therapy information to health consumers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Ascorbic Acid , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clinical Trials as Topic , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Phytotherapy , Resveratrol/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D/therapeutic use
8.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 18(1): 29, 2022 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779659

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a hard-hit area during the COVID-19 pandemic, Belgium knew the highest mortality among people from sub-Saharan African descent, compared to any other group living in the country. After migration, people often maintain traditional perceptions and habits regarding health and healthcare, resulting in a high prevalence of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine use among different migrant communities in northern urban settings. Despite being the largest community of sub-Saharan African descent in Belgium, little is known on ethnobotanical practices of the Belgian Congolese community. We therefore conducted an exploratory study on the use of medicinal plants in the context of COVID-19 and perceptions on this new disease among members of the Congolese community in Belgium. METHODS: We conducted 16 in-depth semi-structured interviews with people of Congolese descent currently living in Belgium. Participants were selected using purposive sampling. Medicinal plant use in the context of COVID-19 was recorded through free-listing. Data on narratives, ideas and perceptions on the origin, cause/aetiology and overall measures against COVID-19 (including vaccination) were collected. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four overarching themes emerged from our data. Firstly, participants perceived the representation of the severity of COVID-19 by the Belgian media and government-and by extend by all governmental agencies in the global north-as exaggerated. As a result, traditional and complementary treatments were seen as feasible options to treat symptoms of the disease. Fifteen forms of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine were documented, of which thirteen were plants. Participants seem to fold back on their Congolese identity and traditional knowledge in seeking coping strategies to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, institutional postcolonial distrust did not only seem to lead to distrust in official messages on the COVID-19 pandemic but also to feelings of vaccination hesitancy. CONCLUSION: In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, participants in our study retreated to, reshaped and adapted traditional and culture-bound knowledge. This study suggests that the fragile and sensitive relationship between sub-Saharan African migrant groups and other social/ethnic groups in Belgium might play a role in their sensitivity to health-threatening situations, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Plants, Medicinal , Belgium , Ethnobotany , Humans , Pandemics
9.
Rev Esc Enferm USP ; 56: e20210362, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765572

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify the possible repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic on the workers' health, the care strategies used, and the provision of Integrative and Complementary Practices in health services in the context of COVID-19. METHOD: Descriptive study, with a qualitative approach, which used a focus group for data collection and content analysis according to Bardin. RESULTS: Eleven health professionals from the city of Registro (SP) participated and, based on the information analysis, four categories emerged: (1) Changes in work routine caused by the pandemic and the feelings they generate in health professionals; (2) Integrative and Complementary Practices as a self-care strategy in the pandemic; (3) Provision of Integrative and Complementary Practices during the pandemic; and (4) Occupational health as the focus and strategy motivator to resume the provision of Integrative and Complementary Practices in the municipality. CONCLUSION: This study allowed the identification of the impact of the pandemic, especially on workers' mental health, which influenced the search for care strategies that included the Integrative and Complementary Practices. Professionals with this training began to offer the Integrative and Complementary Practices in the service to other workers, given the interruption of their provision to the population due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Occupational Health , Humans , Pandemics , Primary Health Care
10.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 43, 2022 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759738

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Major life changing events such as the COVID-19 pandemic may have major impact on one's health and general well-being. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictive factors, including gender specific differences, of Complementary Medicine (CM) use (including CM consultations, self-care management and self-help techniques) during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 in the Netherlands. METHODS: CM use was studied among a random representative sample (n = 1004) of the adult Dutch population using an online survey conducted from 22-27 May 2020. The survey included a modified version of I-CAM-Q and additional questions on demographic characteristics, reasons for CM use, perceived effectiveness and side effects. RESULTS: 68.0% of the participants reported to have used CM (CM consultations (13.3%), self-management strategies (59.4%), self-help techniques (30.0%)). Most frequently reported reason of CM use was to improve general well-being (61.6%), prevention and/or treatment of COVID-19 was only reported by 10%. Perceived effectiveness of CM was high and number of experienced side effects low. Being a women, worried to get infected with COVID-19, higher education and living in northern/ middle region of the Netherlands were predictive factors to use CM. CONCLUSIONS: In the Netherlands, specific groups (e.g. women/ highly educated) use CM, mainly to improve general wellbeing, and seem to benefit of it during the first months of the pandemic. The high perceived effectiveness and low reporting of side effects should encourage medical professionals and policy makers for more openness towards considering CM as being part of an integrative approach to public health in times life changing events occur.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Adult , Female , Humans , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Evid Based Integr Med ; 26: 2515690X211020685, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691167

ABSTRACT

The retrospective cohort study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of Ayurveda treatment exposure as an add-on to conventional care in early stage COVID-19 patients admitted at Samaras COVID care center, Ahmedabad, India. Conventional care included Vitamin-c, Azithromycin, and Paracetamol. Ayurveda formulations used as add-on were Dashamula and Pathyadi decoctions along with Trikatu powder, Sanshamani tablet, AYUSH-64 tablet AND Yastimadhu Ghana tablet for oral administration. Considering Add-on Ayurveda medicines as exposure of interest, patients who received Add-on Ayurveda medicines at least for 7 days were included in the exposed group while those who received only conventional care in unexposed group. Data was collected through record review and telephonic interviews. The outcomes of interest were the development of symptoms, duration of symptomatic phase in those progressing to symptomatic stage and mortality. Total 762 participants were included-[541 (71%) in the exposed group and 221 (29%) in the unexposed. Progression to symptomatic phase did not differ significantly between groups [27.6% in exposed, 24.6% in unexposed, adjusted RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.6-1.2]. The total duration of symptomatic phase among those progressing to the symptomatic stage was significantly decreased in the exposed group (x¯ = 3.66 ± 1.55 days in exposed (n = 133); x¯ = 5.34 ± 3.35 days in unexposed (n = 61), p < 0.001). No mortality was observed in either of the groups. Ayurveda Treatment as adjunctive to conventional care reduced the duration of symptomatic phase in early stage COVID-19 as compared to standalone conventional care. Add-on Ayurveda treatment has promising potential for management of early stage COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acetaminophen/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Medicine, Ayurvedic/methods , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , Antipyretics/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Complementary Therapies/methods , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome
12.
Rev Med Suisse ; 18(764-5): 40-44, 2022 Jan 19.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1644189

ABSTRACT

To illustrate the novelties in integrative and complementary medicine in 2021, the authors present a selection of six articles. One of them is specifically related to COVID-19. The other articles deal with themes that are always relevant and where complementary approaches represent a real added value. Two articles focus on low back pain, a common problem in primary care medicine. The others examine acupuncture in the oncological context, the use of therapeutic suggestions in an operative context, and Tai Chi. The authors thus provide an overview of the range of possible complementary therapeutic approaches that are increasingly supported by evidence, inviting them to be better integrated into clinical practice.


Pour illustrer les nouveautés en médecine intégrative et complémentaire en 2021, les auteur·e·s présentent une sélection de six articles. L'un s'intéresse plus spécifiquement au Covid-19. Les autres touchent des thématiques qui restent toujours d'actualité et où des approches complémentaires peuvent représenter une réelle plus-value. Deux articles ont pour thème les lombalgies, problématique courante en médecine de premier recours. Les autres examinent l'acupuncture dans le contexte oncologique, l'utilisation de suggestions thérapeutiques dans un contexte opératoire, et le Tai Chi. Les auteur·e·s donnent ainsi un aperçu de l'éventail d'approches thérapeutiques complémentaires possibles et de plus en plus soutenues par la science, invitant à les intégrer de mieux en mieux dans la pratique clinique.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Integrative Medicine , Humans
13.
J Integr Med ; 20(1): 45-51, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616618

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Some epidemic diseases such as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have caused many physical, psychological, and social challenges, despite the existence of treatment strategies. Many people are looking for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to prevent such diseases. The present study was performed to determine how some types of CAM were being used during the COVID-19 epidemic in Iran. METHODS: The present study had a cross-sectional descriptive correlational design. All Iranian residents above 17 years old were eligible to participate in the study. A total of 782 participants completed a demographic information questionnaire, a questionnaire about their use of CAMs and a questionnaire about their satisfaction with the CAMs they used. Web-based sampling was conducted from 20 April 2020 to 20 August 2020. RESULTS: Of the participants, 84% used at least one type of CAM during the COVID-19 outbreak. The most used CAMs were dietary supplements (61.3%), prayer (57.9%), and herbal medicines (48.8%). The majority of the participants (50%-66%) have used CAMs to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 or to reduce anxiety caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. CAM use was associated with sex, having children, place of residence, COVID-19 status, and source of gathering information about CAM (P < 0.05). All 32 participants who had been infected with COVID-19 used at least one type of CAM for treatment or alleviation of the disease symptoms. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 outbreak, some types of CAM, particularly nutritional supplements, medicinal herbs, and prayer, were commonly used to prevent COVID-19 and reduce pandemic-related anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Iran , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 145: 112243, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432984

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this pilot clinical study, we report the beneficial effects of beta glucans derived from two strains AFO-202 and N-163 of a black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans on the biomarkers for cytokine storm and coagulopathy in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A total of 24 RT-PCR positive COVID-19 patients were recruited and randomly divided into three groups (Gr): Gr. 1 control (n = 8) - Standard treatment; Gr. 2: Standard treatment + AFO-202 beta glucan (n = 8); and Gr. 3, Standard treatment + combination of AFO-202 and N-163 beta glucans (n = 8) for 30 days. RESULTS: There was no mortality or requirement of ventilation of the subjects in any of the groups. There was a decrease in D-Dimer values (751 ng/ml to 143.89 ng/ml) and IL-6 values (7.395-3.16 pg/ml) in Gr. 1 in 15 days but the levels increased to abnormal levels on day 30 (D-Dimer: 202.5 ng/ml; IL-6 55.37 pg/ml); which steadily decreased up to day 30 in groups 2 (D-dimer: 560.99 ng/dl to 79.615; IL-6: 26.18-3.41 pg/ml) and 3 (D-dimer: 1614 ng/dl to 164.25 ng/dl; IL-6: 6.25-0.5 pg/ml). The same trend was observed with ESR. LCR and LeCR increased while NLR decreased significantly in Gr. 3. CD4 + and CD8 + T cell count showed relatively higher increase in Gr.3. There was no difference in CRP within the groups. CONCLUSION: As these beta glucans are well known food supplements with a track record for safety, larger multi-centric clinical studies are recommended to validate their use as an adjunct in the management of COVID-19 and the ensuing long COVID-19 syndrome.


Subject(s)
Aureobasidium , COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Interleukin-6/analysis , beta-Glucans/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Complementary Therapies/methods , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Dietary Supplements , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
16.
Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am ; 32(2): 393-403, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392484

ABSTRACT

Complementary and integrative health (CIH) modalities have therapeutic value in the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of chronic pain patients. Evidence of such has been seen with the Whole Health Model at the (Veterans Affairs) VA Healthcare system. CIH therapies, including yoga, tai chi, mindfulness meditation, hypnosis, self-massage, and acupressure, are significantly effective for managing chronic pain with little to no negative effects, and can be easily incorporated into telemedicine care with great potential benefit. The future of wellness in telemedicine is evolving with great potential, and needs further attention to addressing barriers of care.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain/therapy , Complementary Therapies/methods , Health Services Accessibility , Integrative Medicine/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Veterans Health Services , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
18.
Molecules ; 26(13)2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304692

ABSTRACT

Respiratory tract infections are underestimated, as they are mild and generally not incapacitating. In clinical medicine, however, these infections are considered a prevalent problem. By 2030, the third most comprehensive reason for death worldwide will be chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to the World Health Organization. The current arsenal of anti-inflammatory drugs shows little or no benefits against COPD. For thousands of years, herbal drugs have been used to cure numerous illnesses; they exhibit promising results and enhance physical performance. Ginseng is one such herbal medicine, known to alleviate pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8) formed by macrophages and epithelial cells. Furthermore, the mechanisms of action of ginsenoside are still not fully understood. Various clinical trials of ginseng have exhibited a reduction of repeated colds and the flu. In this review, ginseng's structural features, the pathogenicity of microbial infections, and the immunomodulatory, antiviral, and anti-bacterial effects of ginseng were discussed. The focus was on the latest animal studies and human clinical trials that corroborate ginseng's role as a therapy for treating respiratory tract infections. The article concluded with future directions and significant challenges. This review would be a valuable addition to the knowledge base for researchers in understanding the promising role of ginseng in treating respiratory tract infections. Further analysis needs to be re-focused on clinical trials to study ginseng's efficacy and safety in treating pathogenic infections and in determining ginseng-drug interactions.


Subject(s)
Ginsenosides/pharmacology , Panax/chemistry , Phytotherapy/methods , Respiratory Tract Infections/drug therapy , Animals , Complementary Therapies , Humans
19.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253890, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During COVID-19, the public actively sought non-pharmacological and self-management approaches to prevent infection. Little is known on the use of traditional, complementary and integrative medicine (TCIM) by the public as preventive measures. This study investigated the prevalence and patterns of TCIM use during the pandemic, and identified factors associated with its use among the general population in Hong Kong. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted from November to December 2020. The survey solicited information on the respondents' sociodemographic characteristics, risk perception of the pandemic, and use of TCIM before and during the pandemic. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine predictors of TCIM use. RESULTS: In total, 632 responses (completion rate = 88.1%) were analyzed. TCIM was used by 44.0% of respondents during the pandemic. The most popular forms of TCIM were vitamins or other dietary supplements (n = 160, 25.3%) and Chinese herbal medicine (n = 122, 19.3%) during the pandemic. The most frequently reported indication was strengthening the immune system, especially for vitamins or other dietary supplements (n = 142/160, 88.8%). Respondents who reported using TCIM were more likely to be female (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29-2.59), had higher education attainment (aOR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.39-3.59), and older-aged (age >55 years: aOR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.04-3.02). Respondents who resided in districts with moderate to high number of confirmed COVID-19 cases (aOR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.07-2.42) and had a higher level of risk perception (aOR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.07) were also more likely to use TCIM. CONCLUSION: TCIM was used commonly in Hong Kong during the COVID-19 pandemic. While vaccination and social distancing remain the mainstay of controlling the pandemic, professional bodies should proactively consider public preferences and provide information regarding the effectiveness and safety of TCIM for COVID-19 prevention and treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Complementary Therapies , Integrative Medicine , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dietary Supplements , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Young Adult
20.
Front Immunol ; 12: 637553, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247858

ABSTRACT

Plants have been extensively studied since ancient times and numerous important chemical constituents with tremendous therapeutic potential are identified. Attacks of microorganisms including viruses and bacteria can be counteracted with an efficient immune system and therefore, stimulation of body's defense mechanism against infections has been proven to be an effective approach. Polysaccharides, terpenoids, flavonoids, alkaloids, glycosides, and lactones are the important phytochemicals, reported to be primarily responsible for immunomodulation activity of the plants. These phytochemicals may act as lead molecules for the development of safe and effective immunomodulators as potential remedies for the prevention and cure of viral diseases. Natural products are known to primarily modulate the immune system in nonspecific ways. A number of plant-based principles have been identified and isolated with potential immunomodulation activity which justify their use in traditional folklore medicine and can form the basis of further specified research. The aim of the current review is to describe and highlight the immunomodulation potential of certain plants along with their bioactive chemical constituents. Relevant literatures of recent years were searched from commonly employed scientific databases on the basis of their ethnopharmacological use. Most of the plants displaying considerable immunomodulation activity are summarized along with their possible mechanisms. These discussions shall hopefully elicit the attention of researchers and encourage further studies on these plant-based immunomodulation products as potential therapy for the management of infectious diseases, including viral ones such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Complementary Therapies/methods , Phytotherapy/methods , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Animals , Humans , Immunomodulation , Plants, Medicinal , Terpenes/therapeutic use
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