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1.
Vaccine ; 41(26): 3907-3914, 2023 06 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239182

ABSTRACT

Health care providers' recommendations can play an important role in individuals' vaccination decisions. Despite being one of the most popular complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), naturopathy is understudied in relation to vaccination decisions. We sought to address this gap through this study of vaccination perspectives of naturopathy practitioners in the province of Quebec, Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews with 30 naturopaths. Thematic analysis was conducted. Main themes were developed deductively (i.e., based on prior literature) and expanded through inductive coding of the data. Participants noted that they discuss vaccination in their practice, but only when clients asked questions or wanted advice. Naturopaths described refraining from explicitly recommending for or against vaccination. Instead, they focus on empowering their clients to make their own informed decision regarding vaccination. Most participants noted that they direct clients towards sources of information so that clients could decide for themselves, but some mentioned they discussed with clients what they considered to be risks associated with vaccination, as well as its benefits. These discussions were framed through a personalized and individual approach with clients.


Subject(s)
Complementary Therapies , Naturopathy , Humans , Quebec , Canada , Vaccination
2.
Asian Nurs Res (Korean Soc Nurs Sci) ; 17(2): 110-117, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237067

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to examine the performance of early warning scoring systems regarding adverse events of unanticipated clinical deterioration in complementary and alternative medicine hospitals. METHODS: A medical record review of 500 patients from 5-year patient data in two traditional Korean medicine hospitals was conducted. Unanticipated clinical deterioration events included unexpected in-hospital mortality, cardiac arrest, and unplanned transfers to acute-care conventional medicine hospitals. Scores of the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), National Early Warning Score (NEWS), and National Early Warning Score 2 (NEWS2) were calculated. Their performance was evaluated by calculating areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for the event occurrence. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the factors associated with event occurrence. RESULTS: The incidence of unanticipated clinical deterioration events was 1.1% (225/21101). The area under the curve of MEWS, NEWS, and NEWS2 was .68, .72, and .72 at 24 hours before the events, respectively. NEWS and NEWS2, with almost the same performance, were superior to MEWS (p = .009). After adjusting for other variables, patients at low-medium risk (OR = 3.28; 95% CI = 1.02-10.55) and those at medium and high risk (OR = 25.03; 95% CI = 2.78-225.46) on NEWS2 scores were more likely to experience unanticipated clinical deterioration than those at low risk. Other factors associated with the event occurrence included frailty risk scores, clinical worry scores, primary medical diagnosis, prescribed medicine administration, acupuncture treatment, and clinical department. CONCLUSIONS: The three early warning scores demonstrated moderate-to-fair performance for clinical deterioration events. NEWS2 can be used for early identification of patients at high risk of deterioration in complementary and alternative medicine hospitals. Additionally, patient, care, and system factors need to be considered to improve patient safety.


Subject(s)
Clinical Deterioration , Complementary Therapies , Humans , Retrospective Studies , ROC Curve , Hospitals , Complementary Therapies/adverse effects
3.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 9264, 2023 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245092

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to clarify the impact of adverse reactions on immune dynamics. We investigated the pattern of systemic adverse reactions after the second and third coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccinations and their relationship with immunoglobulin G against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 spike 1 protein titers, neutralizing antibody levels, peak cellular responses, and the rate of decrease after the third vaccination in a large-scale community-based cohort in Japan. Participants who received a third vaccination with BNT162b2 (Pfizer/BioNTech) or mRNA-1273 (Moderna), had two blood samples, had not had COVID-19, and had information on adverse reactions after the second and third vaccinations (n = 2198) were enrolled. We collected data on sex, age, adverse reactions, comorbidities, and daily medicine using a questionnaire survey. Participants with many systemic adverse reactions after the second and third vaccinations had significantly higher humoral and cellular immunity in the peak phase. Participants with multiple systemic adverse reactions after the third vaccination had small changes in the geometric values of humoral immunity and had the largest geometric mean of cellar immunity in the decay phase. Systemic adverse reactions after the third vaccination helped achieve high peak values and maintain humoral and cellular immunity. This information may help promote uptake of a third vaccination, even among those who hesitate due to adverse reactions.


Subject(s)
BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 , Humans , Antibodies, Viral , BNT162 Vaccine/adverse effects , Complementary Therapies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Vaccination/adverse effects
4.
Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am ; 34(3): 677-688, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314370

ABSTRACT

Physiatry and Integrative Medicine practice approaches the care of patients holistically to achieve recovery and optimal function. The current lack of knowledge on proven treatments for long COVID has resulted in a surge in both demand and use of complementary and integrative health (CIH) treatments. This overview summarizes CIH therapies using the framework of the United States National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, divided into nutritional, psychological, physical, and combinations of these categories. Representative therapies selected based on the availability of published and ongoing research for post-COVID conditions are described.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Integrative Medicine , Humans , United States , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Integrative Medicine/methods , Complementary Therapies/methods
5.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 23(1): 32, 2023 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2310125

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the increased use of social media to share health-related information and the substantial impact that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) can have on individuals' health and wellbeing, currently, to our knowledge, there is no review that compiles research on how social media is used in the context of CAM. The objective of this study was to summarize what are the ways in which social media is used in the context of CAM. METHODS: A scoping review was conducted, following Arksey and O'Malley's five-stage methodological framework. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AMED, and CINAHL databases were systematically searched from inception until October 3, 2020, in addition to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technology in Health (CADTH) website. Eligible studies had to have investigated how at least one social media platform is used in the context of a single or multiple types of CAM treatments. RESULTS: Searches retrieved 1714 items following deduplication, of which 1687 titles and abstracts were eliminated, leaving 94 full-text articles to be considered. Of those, 65 were not eligible, leaving a total of 29 articles eligible for review. Three themes emerged from our analysis: 1) social media is used to share user/practitioner beliefs, attitudes, and experiences about CAM, 2) social media acts as a vehicle for the spread of misinformation about CAM, and 3) there are unique challenges with social media research in the context of CAM. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to social media being a useful tool to share user/practitioner beliefs, attitudes, and experiences about CAM, it has shown to be accessible, effective, and a viable option in delivering CAM therapies and information. Social media has also been shown to spread a large amount of misleading and false information in the context of CAM. Additionally, this review highlights the challenges with conducting social media research in the context of CAM, particularly in collecting a representative sample.


Subject(s)
Complementary Therapies , Social Media , Humans , Canada
6.
Front Immunol ; 14: 1106664, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298551

ABSTRACT

Background: Little is known about the immune determinants for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in individuals vaccinated against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. We therefore attempted to identify differences in humoral and cellular immune responses between patients with non-severe and severe breakthrough COVID-19. Methods: We prospectively enrolled hospitalized patients with breakthrough COVID-19 (severe and non-severe groups) and uninfected individuals who were vaccinated at a similar time (control group). Severe cases were defined as those who required oxygen therapy while hospitalized. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and flow cytometry were used to evaluate humoral and cellular immune responses, respectively. Results: Anti-S1 IgG titers were significantly lower in the severe group than in the non-severe group within 1 week of symptom onset and higher in the non-severe group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, the cellular immune response tended to be diminished in breakthrough cases, particularly in the severe group. In multivariate analysis, advanced age and low anti-S1 IgG titer were associated with severe breakthrough COVID-19. Conclusions: Severe breakthrough COVID-19 might be attributed by low humoral and cellular immune responses early after infection. In the vaccinated population, delayed humoral and cellular immune responses may contribute to severe breakthrough COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Humans , Breakthrough Infections , SARS-CoV-2 , Immunoglobulin G
7.
Front Immunol ; 14: 1130802, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279160

ABSTRACT

Introduction: SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccinations elicit both virus-specific humoral and T-cell responses, but a complex interplay of different influencing factors, such as natural immunity, gender, and age, guarantees host protection. The present study aims to assess the immune dynamics of humoral, T-cell response, and influencing factors to stratify individual immunization status up to 10 months after Comirnaty-vaccine administration. Methods: To this aim, we longitudinally evaluated the magnitude and kinetics of both humoral and T-cell responses by serological tests and enzyme-linked immunospot assay at 5 time points. Furthermore, we compared the course over time of the two branches of adaptive immunity to establish an eventual correlation between adaptive responses. Lastly, we evaluated putative influencing factors collected by an anonymized survey administered to all participants through multiparametric analysis. Among 984 healthcare workers evaluated for humoral immunity, 107 individuals were further analyzed to describe SARS-CoV-2-specific T-cell responses. Participants were divided into 4 age groups: <40 and ≥40 years for men, <48 and ≥48 years for women. Furthermore, results were segregated according to SARS-CoV-2-specific serostatus at baseline. Results: The disaggregated evaluation of humoral responses highlighted antibody levels decreased in older subjects. The humoral responses were higher in females than in males (p=0.002) and previously virus-exposed subjects compared to naïve subjects (p<0.001). The vaccination induced a robust SARS-CoV-2 specific T-cell response at early time points in seronegative subjects compared to baseline levels (p<0.0001). However, a contraction was observed 6 months after vaccination in this group (p<0.01). On the other hand, the pre-existing specific T-cell response detected in natural seropositive individuals was longer-lasting than the response of the seronegative subjects, decreasing only 10 months after vaccination. Our data suggest that T-cell reactiveness is poorly impacted by sex and age. Of note, SARS-CoV-2-specific T-cell response was not correlated to the humoral response at any time point. Discussion: These findings suggest prospects for rescheduling vaccination strategies by considering individual immunization status, personal characteristics, and the appropriate laboratory tests to portray immunity against SARS-CoV-2 accurately. Deepening our knowledge about T and B cell dynamics might optimize the decision-making process in vaccination campaigns, tailoring it to each specific immune response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Male , Humans , Female , Aged , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(12): e33365, 2023 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276407

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, Ayurvedic herbal supplements and homeopathic immune boosters (IBs) were promoted as disease-preventive agents. The present study examined the clinical outcomes among patients with chronic liver disease who presented with complications of portal hypertension or liver dysfunction temporally associated with the use of IBs in the absence of other competing causes. This single-center retrospective observational cohort study included patients with chronic liver disease admitted for the evaluation and management of jaundice, ascites, or hepatic encephalopathy temporally associated with the consumption of IBs and followed up for 180 days. Chemical analysis was performed on the retrieved IBs. From April 2020 to May 2021, 1022 patients with cirrhosis were screened, and 178 (19.8%) were found to have consumed complementary and alternative medicines. Nineteen patients with cirrhosis (10.7%), jaundice, ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, or their combination related to IBs use were included. The patients were predominantly male (89.5%). At admission, 14 (73.75%) patients had jaundice, 9 (47.4%) had ascites, 2 (10.5%) presented with acute kidney injury, and 1 (5.3%) had overt encephalopathy. Eight patients (42.1%) died at the end of the follow up period. Hepatic necrosis and portal-based neutrophilic inflammation were the predominant features of liver biopsies. IB analysis revealed detectable levels of (heavy metals) As (40%), Pb (60%), Hg (60%), and various hepatotoxic phytochemicals. Ayurvedic and Homeopathic supplements sold as IBs potentially cause the worsening of preexisting liver disease. Responsible dissemination of scientifically validated, evidence-based medical health information from regulatory bodies and media may help ameliorate this modifiable liver health burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Hepatic Encephalopathy , Irritable Bowel Syndrome , Jaundice , Humans , Male , Female , Hepatic Encephalopathy/etiology , Pandemics , Ascites/etiology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/complications , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/therapy , Jaundice/complications , Complementary Therapies/adverse effects
9.
Am J Public Health ; 111(4): 739-742, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2281972

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To understand whether and how crowdfunding campaigns are a source of COVID-19-related misinformation.Methods. We searched the GoFundMe crowdfunding platform using 172 terms associated with medical misinformation about COVID-19 prophylaxes and treatments. We screened resulting campaigns for those making statements about the ability of these searched-for or related terms to prevent or treat COVID-19.Results. There were 208 campaigns worldwide that requested $21 475 568, raised $324 305 from 4367 donors, and were shared 24 158 times. The most discussed interventions were dietary supplements and purported immune system boosters (n = 231), followed by other forms of complementary and alternative medicine (n = 24), and unproven medical interventions (n = 15). Most (82.2%) of the campaigns made definitive efficacy claims.Conclusions. Campaigners focused their efforts on dietary supplements and immune system boosters. Campaigns for purported COVID-19 treatments are particularly concerning, but purported prophylaxes could also distract from known effective preventative approaches. GoFundMe should join other online and social media platforms to actively restrict campaigns that spread misinformation about COVID-19 or seek to better inform campaigners about evidence-based prophylaxes and treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Crowdsourcing/economics , Healthcare Financing , Social Media , Complementary Therapies , Dietary Supplements , Humans
10.
J Integr Complement Med ; 28(7): 549-551, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239981
11.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 18(1): 29, 2022 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841015

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a hard-hit area during the COVID-19 pandemic, Belgium knew the highest mortality among people from sub-Saharan African descent, compared to any other group living in the country. After migration, people often maintain traditional perceptions and habits regarding health and healthcare, resulting in a high prevalence of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine use among different migrant communities in northern urban settings. Despite being the largest community of sub-Saharan African descent in Belgium, little is known on ethnobotanical practices of the Belgian Congolese community. We therefore conducted an exploratory study on the use of medicinal plants in the context of COVID-19 and perceptions on this new disease among members of the Congolese community in Belgium. METHODS: We conducted 16 in-depth semi-structured interviews with people of Congolese descent currently living in Belgium. Participants were selected using purposive sampling. Medicinal plant use in the context of COVID-19 was recorded through free-listing. Data on narratives, ideas and perceptions on the origin, cause/aetiology and overall measures against COVID-19 (including vaccination) were collected. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four overarching themes emerged from our data. Firstly, participants perceived the representation of the severity of COVID-19 by the Belgian media and government-and by extend by all governmental agencies in the global north-as exaggerated. As a result, traditional and complementary treatments were seen as feasible options to treat symptoms of the disease. Fifteen forms of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine were documented, of which thirteen were plants. Participants seem to fold back on their Congolese identity and traditional knowledge in seeking coping strategies to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, institutional postcolonial distrust did not only seem to lead to distrust in official messages on the COVID-19 pandemic but also to feelings of vaccination hesitancy. CONCLUSION: In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, participants in our study retreated to, reshaped and adapted traditional and culture-bound knowledge. This study suggests that the fragile and sensitive relationship between sub-Saharan African migrant groups and other social/ethnic groups in Belgium might play a role in their sensitivity to health-threatening situations, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Plants, Medicinal , Belgium , Ethnobotany , Humans , Pandemics
12.
J Integr Complement Med ; 29(2): 127-130, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2160889

ABSTRACT

Background: Complementary and integrative health (CIH) interventions show promise in improving overall wellness and engaging Veterans at risk of suicide. Methods: An intensive 4-week telehealth CIH intervention programming was delivered motivated by the COVID-19 pandemic, and outcomes were measured pre-post program completion. Results: With 93% program completion (121 Veterans), significant reduction in depression and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms were observed pre-post telehealth CIH programing, but not in sleep quality. Improvements in pain symptoms, and stress management skills were observed in Veterans at risk of suicide. Discussion: Telehealth CIH interventions show promise in improving mental health symptoms among at-risk Veterans, with great potential to broaden access to care toward suicide prevention.


Subject(s)
Complementary Therapies , Health Services Accessibility , Telemedicine , Veterans , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Veterans/psychology , Traditional Medicine Practitioners
13.
Biosci Trends ; 16(6): 386-388, 2022 Dec 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2164104

ABSTRACT

The different viral characteristics of the Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 have fundamentally changed people's view concerning COVID-19. Many alternative sampling approaches and therapies have been developed that may be better suited to the Omicron variant, such as a saline gargle to detect SARS-CoV-2 and nasal irrigation with chlorine dioxide. The mechanisms of these methods of sampling and alternative therapies are briefly summarized here. Development of novel alternative sampling/therapeutic approaches for COVID-19 is crucial due to the uncertain future of emerging respiratory viruses, and their efficiency/safety needs to be verified in a post-pandemic era since viral infections of the respiratory tract have a similar route of transmission as SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics
14.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 292, 2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119479

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Belief in complementary and alternative medicine practices is related to reduced preparedness for vaccination. This study aimed to assess home remedy awareness and use in South Tyrol, where vaccination rates in the coronavirus pandemic were lowest in Italy and differed between German- and Italian-speaking inhabitants. METHODS: A population-based survey was conducted in 2014 and analyzed using descriptive statistics, multiple logistic regression, and latent class analysis. RESULTS: Of the representative sample of 504 survey respondents, 357 (70.8%) participants (43.0% male; primary language German, 76.5%) reported to use home remedies. Most commonly reported home remedies were teas (48.2%), plants (21.0%), and compresses (19.5%). Participants from rural regions were less likely (odds ratio 0.35, 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.67), while female (2.62, 1.69-4.10) and German-speaking participants (5.52, 2.91-9.88) were more likely to use home remedies. Latent classes of home remedies were "alcoholic home remedies" (21.4%) and "non-alcohol-containing home remedies" (78.6%). Compared to the "non-alcohol-containing home remedies" class, members of the "alcoholic home remedies" class were more likely to live in an urban region, to be male and German speakers. CONCLUSION: In addition to residence and sex, language group membership associates with awareness and use of home remedies. Home remedies likely contribute to socio-cultural differences between the language groups in the Italian Alps. If the observed associations explain the lower vaccination rates in South Tyrol among German speakers requires further study.


Subject(s)
Complementary Therapies , Medicine, Traditional , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
16.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 251, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053897

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Complementary and Integrative Medicine (CIM) is often taken up by individuals seeking relief from different diseases. This study investigates the prevalence and associated factors of CIM use in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: In this telephone-based, cross-sectional study, data on CIM usage were collected from COVID-19 patients from February till June 2020 in Fars province, Iran using a researcher-made checklist. Additionally, we asked about the patients' attitudes toward these treatments. RESULTS: Out of 453 patients diagnosed with COVID-19, 400 (88.30%) responded to our calls and agreed to participate in the study. Among them, 276 patients reported using CIM to treat COVID-19 [prevalence: 69% (95% CI: 64.2 to 73.5)]. The most frequently used herbal medicine among COVID-19 patients was ginger (n = 273, 98.9%), thyme (n = 263, 95.3%), and black cumin (n = 205, 74.3%). Most of these patients were recommended to use herbal medicine by their families and friends (n = 96, 34.8%). Univariable logistic regression revealed that age under 50 years old, residency in urban areas (including the capital of the province and small cities), employment, academic education, and being an outpatient were statistically significant factors resulting in CIM usage. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that CIM use among outpatients was 3.65 times more than among inpatients. In addition, patients under 50 years old used CIM 85% more than older patients. Ultimately, only 9 (3.3%) patients consulted with their doctors regarding these medications. No side effects due to CIM use were reported. CONCLUSION: Many patients with COVID-19 used CIM, but few consulted with their physicians in this regard. Therefore, physicians should ask their patients about CIM usage, and patients should also report their use of CIM therapies during their medical visits. Furthermore, age and hospitalization status affected CIM use among patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Integrative Medicine , Complementary Therapies/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Prevalence
17.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 234, 2022 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009387

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic lockdown has had a profound impact on physical and mental well-being throughout the world. Previous studies have revealed that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequently used for, and can be potential beneficial for strengthening physical mental resilience. The aims of this study were therefore to determine the prevalence and reasons for use of CAM during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic among a representative sample of the Norwegian population, and further determine self-reported effects and adverse effects of the CAM modalities used. METHODS: Computer assisted telephone interviews using a COVID-adapted I-CAM-Q questionnaire were conducted with 1008 randomly selected Norwegians aged 16 and above using multistage sampling during April and May 2020 applying age and sex quotas for each area. Frequencies, Pearson's chi-square tests, Fisher exact tests, and independent sample t-test were used to identify the users of CAM, what they used, why they used it and whether they experienced effect and/or adverse effects of the modalities used, and further to describe differences in sociodemographic factors associated with CAM use. Cronbach's alpha tests were used to test for internal consistency in the different groups of CAM. Significance level was set to p < 0.05. RESULTS: The study revealed that two thirds of the respondents (67%) had used CAM within the first 3 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular CAM modalities that did not involve a provider. Most used were natural remedies and dietary supplement (57%, mainly vitamins and minerals), but self-help practices like yoga and meditation were also widely used (24%). Women used CAM modalities significantly more than men (77% vs. 58%). Most of the respondents found the modalities they used beneficial, and few reported adverse effects of the treatments. CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of the Norwegian population used CAM during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic with high satisfaction and few reported adverse effects. CAM was rarely used to prevent or treat COVID-19, but rather to treat a long-term health condition, and to improve well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Norway/epidemiology , Pandemics
18.
Otolaryngol Clin North Am ; 55(5): 1035-1044, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008015

ABSTRACT

The use of complementary and integrative medicine has increased . It is estimated that one-third of the population of the United States uses some form of alternative medicine. Physicians should consider integrative medicine therapies . Alternative medical therapies for the common cold and influenza include herbal supplements, dietary supplements, diet, and other adjunct therapies. However, it is important to research and study these therapies. Therefore, communication with patients and other health care providers is important. This will ensure effective and positive patient care experiences. Further randomized clinical trials are necessary to further establish the role of various alternative options.


Subject(s)
Common Cold , Complementary Therapies , Influenza, Human , Integrative Medicine , Common Cold/therapy , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Influenza, Human/therapy , United States
19.
J Altern Complement Med ; 27(8): 623-626, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338078
20.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 118(10): 179, 2021 03 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383846
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