Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
4.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(3)2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119288

ABSTRACT

A woman in her 70s presented to the emergency department with fever, fluctuating cognition and headache. A detailed examination revealed neurological weakness to the lower limbs with atonia and areflexia, leading to a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, alongside a concurrent COVID-19 infection. The patient required critical care escalation for respiratory support. After stepdown to a rehabilitation ward, she had difficulties communicating due to new aphonia, hearing loss and left third nerve palsy. The team used written communication with the patient, and with this the patient was able to signal neurological deterioration. Another neurological examination noted a different pattern of weakness to the lower limbs, along with new urinary retention, and spinal arachnoiditis was identified. After more than 10 weeks in the hospital, the patient was discharged. Throughout this case, there were multiple handovers between teams and specialties, all of which were underpinned by good communication and examination to achieve the best care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Meningitis, Escherichia coli/complications , Aged , Amoxicillin/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/therapy , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Coinfection , Combined Modality Therapy , Communication , Confusion/etiology , Critical Care , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Fever/etiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Meningitis, Escherichia coli/diagnostic imaging , Meningitis, Escherichia coli/drug therapy , Patient Care Team , Physical Therapy Modalities , Physician-Patient Relations , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
7.
Neurologia (Engl Ed) ; 35(9): 621-627, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-759217

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We analysed the neurological complications of patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection who required intensive care unit (ICU) admission. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, observational, descriptive study of consecutive patients admitted to the ICU due to severe respiratory symptoms secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection between 1 April and 1 June 2020. RESULTS: We included 30 patients with neurological symptoms; 21 were men (72.40%), and mean age (standard deviation [SD]) was 57.41 years (11.61). The mean duration of ICU stay was 18.83 days (14.33). The neurological conditions recorded were acute confusional syndrome in 28 patients (93.33%), neuromuscular disease in 15 (50%), headache in 5 (16.66%), cerebrovascular disease in 4 (13.33%), and encephalopathies/encephalitis in 4 (13.33%). CSF analysis results were normal in 6 patients (20%). Brain MRI or head CT showed alterations in 20 patients (66.6%). EEG was performed in all patients (100%), with 8 (26.66%) showing abnormal findings. In 5 of the 15 patients with clinical myopathy, diagnosis was confirmed with electroneuromyography. We found a correlation between older age and duration of ICU stay (P=.002; 95%CI: 4.032-6.022; OR: 3,594). CONCLUSIONS: Severe COVID-19 mainly affects men, as observed in other series. Half of our patients presented acute myopathy, and almost all patients left the ICU with acute confusional syndrome, which fully resolved; no correlation was found with EEG or neuroimaging findings. Older age is associated with longer ICU stay.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Critical Illness , Muscular Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acute Disease , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Confusion/epidemiology , Confusion/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Muscular Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Neuroimaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
8.
Neurol Sci ; 41(10): 2681-2684, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-716315

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Cerebral infarction in COVID-19 patients might be associated with a hypercoagulable state related to a systemic inflammatory response. Its diagnosis might be challenging. We present two critically ill patients with COVID-19 who presented acutely altered mental status as the main manifestation of multiple strokes. METHODS: Clinical presentation and diagnostic work-up of the patients. RESULTS: Two patients in their sixties were hospitalized with a bilateral pneumonia COVID-19. They developed respiratory failure and were admitted to ICU for mechanical ventilation and intense medical treatment. They were started on low-molecular-weight heparin since admission. Their laboratory results showed lymphopenia and increased levels of C-reactive protein and D-dimer. Case 1 developed hypofibrinogenemia and presented several cutaneous lesions with biopsy features of thrombotic vasculopathy. Case 2 was performed a CT pulmonary angiogram at ICU showing a bilateral pulmonary embolism. When waking up, both patients were conscious but with a remarkable global altered mental status without focal neurological deficits. A brain MRI revealed multiple acute bilateral ischemic lesions with areas of hemorrhagic transformation in both patients (case 1: affecting the left frontal and temporal lobes and both occipital lobes; case 2: affecting both frontal and left occipital lobes). Cardioembolic source and acquired antiphospholipid syndrome were ruled out. COVID-19-associated coagulopathy was suspected as the possible main etiology of the strokes. CONCLUSION: Acutely altered mental status might be the main manifestation of multiple brain infarctions in critically ill COVID-19 patients. It should be specially considered in those with suspected COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. Full-dose anticoagulation and clinical-radiological monitoring might reduce their neurological consequences.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Confusion/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Critical Illness/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Acute Disease , Aged , COVID-19 , Confusion/diagnostic imaging , Confusion/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Can J Neurol Sci ; 48(1): 66-76, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Growing evidence showed that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection may present with neurological manifestations. This review aimed to determine the neurological manifestations and complications in COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis that included cohort and case series/reports involving a population of patients confirmed with COVID-19 infection and their neurologic manifestations. We searched the following electronic databases until April 18, 2020: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and World Health Organization database (PROSPERO registration number: CRD42020180658). RESULTS: From 403 articles identified, 49 studies involving a total of 6,335 confirmed COVID-19 cases were included. The random-effects modeling analysis for each neurological symptom showed the following proportional point estimates with 95% confidence intervals: "headache" (0.12; 0.10-0.14; I2 = 77%), "dizziness" (0.08; 0.05-0.12; I2 = 82%), "headache and dizziness" (0.09; 0.06-0.13; I2 = 0%), "nausea" (0.07; 0.04-0.11; I2 = 79%), "vomiting" (0.05; 0.03-0.08; I2 = 74%), "nausea and vomiting" (0.06; 0.03-0.11; I2 = 83%), "confusion" (0.05; 0.02-0.14; I2 = 86%), and "myalgia" (0.21; 0.18-0.25; I2 = 85%). The most common neurological complication associated with COVID-19 infection was vascular disorders (n = 23); other associated conditions were encephalopathy (n = 3), encephalitis (n = 1), oculomotor nerve palsy (n = 1), isolated sudden-onset anosmia (n = 1), Guillain-Barré syndrome (n = 1), and Miller-Fisher syndrome (n = 2). Most patients with neurological complications survived (n = 14); a considerable number of patients died (n = 7); and the rest had unclear outcomes (n = 12). CONCLUSION: This review revealed that neurologic involvement may manifest in COVID-19 infection. What has initially been thought of as a primarily respiratory illness has evolved into a wide-ranging multi-organ disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Anosmia/etiology , Anosmia/physiopathology , Brain Diseases/etiology , Brain Diseases/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/physiopathology , Cerebral Infarction/etiology , Cerebral Infarction/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Confusion/etiology , Confusion/physiopathology , Dizziness/etiology , Dizziness/physiopathology , Encephalitis/etiology , Encephalitis/physiopathology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Myalgia/etiology , Nausea/etiology , Nausea/physiopathology , Oculomotor Nerve Diseases/etiology , Oculomotor Nerve Diseases/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/etiology , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/physiopathology , Vomiting/etiology , Vomiting/physiopathology
10.
Neurophysiol Clin ; 50(3): 155-165, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613786

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Although rare, neurological manifestations in SARS-CoV-2 infection are increasingly being reported. We conducted a retrospective systematic study to describe the electroencephalography (EEG) characteristics in this disease, looking for specific patterns. METHODS: EEGs performed in patients with positive PCR for SARS-CoV-2 between 25/03/2020 and 06/05/2020 in the University Hospital of Bicêtre were independently reviewed by two experienced neurologists. We used the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society's terminology for the description of abnormal patterns. EEGs were classified into five categories, from normal to critically altered. Interobserver reliability was calculated using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Medical records were reviewed to extract demographics, clinical, imaging and biological data. RESULTS: Forty EEGs were reviewed in 36 COVID-19 patients, 18 in intensive care units (ICU) and 22 in medicine units. The main indications were confusion or fluctuating alertness for 23 (57.5%) and delayed awakening after stopping sedation in ICU in six (15%). EEGs were normal to mildly altered in 23 (57.5%) contrary to the 42.5% where EEG alterations were moderate in four (10%), severe in eight (20%) and critical in five (12.5%). Generalized periodic discharges (GPDs), multifocal periodic discharges (MPDs) or rhythmic delta activity (RDA) were found in 13 recordings (32.5%). EEG alterations were not stereotyped or specific. They could be related to an underlying morbid status, except for three ICU patients with unexplained encephalopathic features. CONCLUSION: In this first systematic analysis of COVID-19 patients who underwent EEG, over half of them presented a normal recording pattern. EEG alterations were not different from those encountered in other pathological conditions.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Confusion/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delayed Emergence from Anesthesia/etiology , Electroencephalography , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arousal/physiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Brain Waves/physiology , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Confusion/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Deep Sedation , Delayed Emergence from Anesthesia/physiopathology , Dementia/complications , Dementia/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL