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1.
Dig Dis Sci ; 67(2): 390-396, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718797

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Over the last few decades, advances have been made regarding gender equality starting from medical students to trainees, to leadership in academics. The female representation in specialty academic conferences not only reflects the existing gender disparities in that specialty but also can influence young female trainees to join that field. Digestive Disease Week (DDW) is the premier digestive disease event. We aimed to calculate the proportion of female representation among speakers and moderators at the DDW meetings held from 2018 to 2020. METHODS: The data for DDW 2018-2020 were collected via the online web-based planner. The gender of speakers of presentations and moderators of sessions were identified by a google search. We further categorized the data by each participating society (AGA, ASGE, AASLD, and SSAT), by presentation track, by session track, and total overall representation in each year. RESULTS: Despite the subject of the gender gap being in focus, the proportion of female moderators and speakers was low in DDW in the last 3 years. The female speakers constituted 31.6% in 2018, 33.8% in 2019 and 34.6% in 2020. There was slightly improved female representation in sessions of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Stomach, and Small Bowel Disorders, Microbiome in GI & Liver disease, and Basic Science over the last 3 years. CONCLUSION: Based on our study and those referenced in this article, we believe that strategies to promote the inclusivity of female moderators and speakers at DDW provide a huge opportunity to influence gender equity within GI.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic/trends , Gastroenterology/trends , Physicians, Women/trends , Digestive System Diseases , Humans , Societies, Medical
2.
Fluids Barriers CNS ; 19(1): 19, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1717977

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Scientific conferences are vital communication events for scientists in academia, industry, and government agencies. In the brain barriers research field, several international conferences exist that allow researchers to present data, share knowledge, and discuss novel ideas and concepts. These meetings are critical platforms for researchers to connect and exchange breakthrough findings on a regular basis. Due to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, all in-person meetings were canceled in 2020. In response, we launched the Brain Barriers Virtual 2020 (BBV2020) seminar series, the first stand-in virtual event for the brain barriers field, to offer scientists a virtual platform to present their work. Here we report the aggregate attendance information on two in-person meetings compared with BBV2020 and comment on the utility of the virtual platform. METHODS: The BBV2020 seminar series was hosted on a Zoom webinar platform and was free of cost for participants. Using registration- and Zoom-based data from the BBV2020 virtual seminar series and survey data collected from BBV2020 participants, we analyzed attendance trends, global reach, participation based on career stage, and engagement of BBV2020. We compared these data with those from two previous in-person conferences, a BBB meeting held in 2018 and CVB 2019. RESULTS: We found that BBV2020 seminar participation steadily decreased over the course of the series. In contrast, live participation was consistently above 100 attendees and recording views were above 200 views per seminar. We also found that participants valued BBV2020 as a supplement during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. Based on one post-BBV2020 survey, the majority of participants indicated that they would prefer in-person meetings but would welcome a virtual component to future in-person meetings. Compared to in-person meetings, BBV2020 enabled participation from a broad range of career stages and was attended by scientists in academic, industry, and government agencies from a wide range of countries worldwide. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a virtual event such as the BBV2020 seminar series provides easy access to science for researchers across all career stages around the globe. However, we recognize that limitations exist. Regardless, such a virtual event could be a valuable tool for the brain barriers community to reach and engage scientists worldwide to further grow the brain barriers research field in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Central Nervous System , Congresses as Topic , Videoconferencing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(3): 124-126, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702215

ABSTRACT

The Association for Leadership Science in Nursing's 2021 conference provided an opportunity to further enhance professional understanding of the difficulties facing nurse leaders as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to create unimaginable challenges. Presentations provided evidence in support of courageous caring leadership interventions.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic , Societies, Nursing , Health Equity , Humans , Leadership , Professional Role
5.
Ann N Y Acad Sci ; 1507(1): 70-83, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673249

ABSTRACT

For many years, it was believed that the aging process was inevitable and that age-related diseases could not be prevented or reversed. The geroscience hypothesis, however, posits that aging is, in fact, malleable and, by targeting the hallmarks of biological aging, it is indeed possible to alleviate age-related diseases and dysfunction and extend longevity. This field of geroscience thus aims to prevent the development of multiple disorders with age, thereby extending healthspan, with the reduction of morbidity toward the end of life. Experts in the field have made remarkable advancements in understanding the mechanisms underlying biological aging and identified ways to target aging pathways using both novel agents and repurposed therapies. While geroscience researchers currently face significant barriers in bringing therapies through clinical development, proof-of-concept studies, as well as early-stage clinical trials, are underway to assess the feasibility of drug evaluation and lay a regulatory foundation for future FDA approvals in the future.


Subject(s)
Aging/genetics , Aging/metabolism , Congresses as Topic/trends , Longevity/physiology , Research Report , Autophagy/physiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Metabolomics/methods , Metabolomics/trends , Nervous System Diseases/genetics , Nervous System Diseases/metabolism , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Stem Cell Transplantation/trends
6.
Alzheimers Dement ; 17(11): 1868-1871, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669365
7.
Ann N Y Acad Sci ; 1506(1): 74-97, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612914

ABSTRACT

Single cell biology has the potential to elucidate many critical biological processes and diseases, from development and regeneration to cancer. Single cell analyses are uncovering the molecular diversity of cells, revealing a clearer picture of the variation among and between different cell types. New techniques are beginning to unravel how differences in cell state-transcriptional, epigenetic, and other characteristics-can lead to different cell fates among genetically identical cells, which underlies complex processes such as embryonic development, drug resistance, response to injury, and cellular reprogramming. Single cell technologies also pose significant challenges relating to processing and analyzing vast amounts of data collected. To realize the potential of single cell technologies, new computational approaches are needed. On March 17-19, 2021, experts in single cell biology met virtually for the Keystone eSymposium "Single Cell Biology" to discuss advances both in single cell applications and technologies.


Subject(s)
Cell Differentiation/physiology , Cellular Reprogramming/physiology , Congresses as Topic/trends , Embryonic Development/physiology , Research Report , Single-Cell Analysis/trends , Animals , Cell Lineage/physiology , Humans , Macrophages/physiology , Single-Cell Analysis/methods
10.
Clin Invest Med ; 44(3): E4-10, 2021 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604134

ABSTRACT

The 2020 Annual General Meeting (AGM) and Young Investigators' Forum of the Canadian Society for Clinical Investigation / Société Canadienne de Recherches Clinique (CSCI/SCRC) and Clinician Investigator Trainee Association of Canada/Association des Cliniciens-Chercheurs en Formation du Canada (CITAC/ACCFC) was the first meeting to be hosted virtually. The theme was "Navigating Uncertainty, Embracing Change and Empowering the Next Generation of Clinician-Scientists", and the meeting featured lectures and workshops that were designed to provide knowledge and skills for professional development of clinician investigator trainees. The opening remarks were given by Jason Berman (President of CSCI/SCRC), Tina Marvasti (President of CITAC/ACCFC) and Nicola Jones (University of Toronto Clinician Investigator Program Symposium Chair). Dr. Michael Strong, President of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, delivered the keynote presentation titled "CIHR's COVID-19 Response and Strategic Planning". Dr. John Bell (University of Ottawa) received the CSCI Distinguished Scientist Award, Dr. Stanley Nattel (Université de Montréal) received the CSCI-RCPSC Henry Friesen Award (RCPSC; Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada) and Dr. Meghan Azad (University of Manitoba) received the CSCI Joe Doupe Young Investigator Award. Each scientist delivered talks on their award-winning research. The interactive workshops were "Developing Strategies to Maintain Wellness", "Understanding the Hidden Curriculum: Power and Privilege in Science and Medicine", "Hiring a Clinician Scientist Trainee: What Leaders Are Looking For" and "COVID-19: A Case Study for Pivoting Your Research". The AGM included presentations from clinician investigator trainees nationwide. Over 70 abstracts were showcased, most are summarized in this review, and six were selected for oral presentations.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Research Personnel , Canada , Congresses as Topic , Humans
12.
Ther Apher Dial ; 25(4): 376, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575949
13.
Virology ; 566: 114-121, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556999

ABSTRACT

This communication summarizes the presentations given at the 1st international conference of the World Society for Virology (WSV) held virtually during 16-18 June 2021, under the theme of tackling global viral epidemics. The purpose of this biennial meeting is to foster international collaborations and address important viral epidemics in different hosts. The first day included two sessions exclusively on SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19. The other two days included one plenary and three parallel sessions each. Last not least, 16 sessions covered 140 on-demand submitted talks. In total, 270 scientists from 49 countries attended the meeting, including 40 invited keynote speakers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Congresses as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Societies, Scientific , Virology
16.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e790-e793, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517507

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global burden of neurosurgical disease is substantial, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Medical conferences are important in connecting those from LMICs to those from high-income countries for support and serve as an educational and networking tool. In this study, we sought to quantitatively assess the incorporation of global neurosurgery topics in international conferences related to the neurosurgical specialty. METHODS: A database of major international neurosurgical conferences, from the conference of a group of 9 major neurosurgical societies, that had global neurosurgery featured from 2015 to 2020 was created. We then did a retrospective analysis to study the characteristics of these conferences ranging from geographic location to number to different components of the conferences. RESULTS: There was an increase in the number of conferences with global neurosurgery since 2015. This, in addition to the occurrence of 3 wholly global neurosurgery-related conferences in recent years, is promising and suggests growth in the field. However, 52.6% of conferences took place in North American or European countries, the majority of which were high-income countries. Furthermore, a majority of the presence of global neurosurgery was in the form of individual talks (54.5%) as opposed to plenaries or sessions. CONCLUSIONS: The preponderance of conferences in North America and Europe can pose barriers for those from LMICs including travel time, expenses, and visa problems. As global neurosurgery becomes an increasing part of the global health movement, we hope that these barriers are addressed. Conferences may become an even stronger tool to promote equity in neurosurgical education and practice.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic/trends , Global Health/trends , Internationality , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Cohort Studies , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Retrospective Studies
19.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3182-3183, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505577

ABSTRACT

Gregory Quirk has worked in New York, Honduras, and Puerto Rico with a decades-long commitment to mentorship and the global promotion of neuroscience. In an interview with Neuron, he talks about his upcoming move to the University of the Philippines and how virtual meetings are making us rethink collaborations and interactions with members of the community.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic , Mentoring , Mentors , Neurosciences , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3190-3192, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505576

ABSTRACT

In Korea, the pandemic has elevated scientists as trusted sources for both policy decisions and dinner table conversation. In an interview with Neuron, Eunji Cheong discusses how we need to support future generations by fostering scientific thinking, patience, and flexibility.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences , Policy Making , Professional Role , Thinking , COVID-19 , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2 , Women, Working , Work-Life Balance
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