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5.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(4): 396-407, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506637

ABSTRACT

Online health misinformation is a growing problem, and health information professionals and consumers would benefit from an evaluation of health websites for reliability and trustworthiness. Terms from the Google COVID-19 Search Trends dataset were searched on Google to determine the most frequently appearing consumer health information websites. The quality of the resulting top five websites was evaluated. The top five websites that appeared most frequently were WebMD, Mayo Clinic, Healthline, MedlinePlus, and Medical News Today, respectively. All websites, except Medline Plus, received HONcode certification. Based on DISCERN and CRAAP scores, MedlinePlus was found to be the most reliable health website.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information , Humans , Internet , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine
6.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(20): 6431-6438, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503075

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection can cause smell and taste dysfunction. We aimed to investigate the general community's interest in smell dysfunction (SD) and taste dysfunction (TD) using Google Trends to compare results with more common symptoms associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection, such as fever and cough. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Relative Search Volumes (RSVs) for the English terms "Smell", "Taste", "Fever" and "Cough", filtered by the category "Health", were collected from 2018 through 2020. Moreover, RSVs using synonyms of "Taste" and "Smell" in 5 European languages were analyzed. RESULTS: The worldwide mean RSVs for "Fever", "Cough", "Smell", and "Taste" during 2020 were 49%, 34%, 8% and 9%, respectively. RSVs associated with the search terms "Fever" and "Cough" showed a peak between February and March 2020, as did "Smell" and "Taste". Even though RSVs were much lower, they were highly correlated (r=0.890). RSVs obtained from "Smell" and "Taste" in five European languages (German, English, French, Italian and Spanish) had similar temporal trends. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show the level of the general population's interest for early symptoms, suggesting that their interest in SARS-CoV-2 infection symptoms, such as SD and TD, was scarce but peaked during the pandemic outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Consumer Health Information , Olfaction Disorders/diagnosis , Taste Disorders/diagnosis , Humans
7.
Nutrients ; 13(11)2021 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480893

ABSTRACT

We obtained data from Google Trends and Wikipedia in order to assess whether an analysis of Internet searches could provide information on the Internet users' behaviour/interest in diets. Differences in seasonality, year and before/during COVID-19 pandemic were assessed. From Wikipedia, we extracted the number of times a page is viewed by users, aggregated on monthly and seasonal bases. We also used Google Trends to evaluate the frequency of the users' web searches. The Mediterranean diet was the most frequently (33.9%), followed by the pescatarian diet (9.0%). Statistically, significant seasonal differences were found for the Mediterranean, vegetarian, Atkins, Scarsdale, and zone diets and pescetarianism. The most commonly searched diet and consequent diet-related queries on Google resulted to be: Dukan diet, Dukan and weight loss. Ketogenic, FODMAP and intermittent fasting diets were statistically more frequently searched during the pandemic compared with before. Our data show a different trend of searches based on the seasonality, year and the pandemic. These data could be useful for scientists, practitioners and policy makers because they can inform educational campaigns via the Internet, especially in periods when the population is more receptive.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information/trends , Diet, Healthy/trends , Internet Use/trends , Search Engine/trends , Humans , Italy , Nutritive Value , Seasons , Time Factors , Weight Loss
8.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 6967166, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476881

ABSTRACT

Health big data has already been the most important big data for its serious privacy disclosure concerns and huge potential value of secondary use. Measurements must be taken to balance and compromise both the two serious challenges. One holistic solution or strategy is regarded as the preferred direction, by which the risk of reidentification from records should be kept as low as possible and data be shared with the principle of minimum necessary. In this article, we present a comprehensive review about privacy protection of health data from four aspects: health data, related regulations, three strategies for data sharing, and three types of methods with progressive levels. Finally, we summarize this review and identify future research directions.


Subject(s)
Confidentiality , Health Records, Personal , Privacy , Consumer Health Information , Genomics , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Humans , Information Dissemination , Models, Theoretical , United States
12.
J Healthc Eng ; 2021: 2122095, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438134

ABSTRACT

This study aims to explore phenomena and laws that occur when different users on social network platforms obtain health information by constructing an opinion mining model, analyzing the user's position on selected cases, and exploring the reflection of the phenomenon of truth decay on platforms. It selects group posts regarding the COVID-19 vaccination dispute on the Douban platform, analyzes the positions of different users, and explores phenomena related to users obtaining health information on domestic social platforms according to different topics and information behaviors. The results reveal a linear relationship between the negative and neutral attitudes of netizens on social networking platforms. Moreover, netizens tend to hold subjective language when expressing their views and attitudes, and their views on social platforms will not change easily. The study explores the health information acquisition behavior of netizens on social platforms based on the constructed user opinion mining model. The study is helpful for relevant units and platforms to make scientific decisions and provide guidance according to different positions of Internet users.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information , Social Media , Social Networking , Attitude , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409526

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to explore consumers' experiences before and during the COVID-19 outbreak to improve public health by providing effective consumer health information. METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 20 health information consumers who were 18 or older until data saturation was reached. The selected participants were among users of the Korean National Health Insurance Service (NHIS). The data were collected before the COVID-19 outbreak (September 2014) and during the COVID-19 outbreak (October 2020) to describe experiences and changes before and during the pandemic. Data were analyzed according to the qualitative content analysis method. RESULTS: As a result, 3 main domains and 10 subdomains were derived from classifications, changes, and challenges of online health information seekers. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study guide the understanding of health information seekers for the development of consumer-tailored health information systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information , Humans , National Health Programs , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Health Inf Manag ; 50(1-2): 13-25, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398797

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study examined the health literacy demands of My Health Record (MyHR) in the context of preparing for a government-announced opt-out system by repeating two studies of health information and usability conducted in 2016. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether Australia's MyHR meets the information and usability needs of people at risk of low health literacy and changes since 2016. METHOD: Content analysis: Informed by the 2016 methods and findings, measures of information quality, themes and target audiences were recorded and reported for each online consumer-facing health information resource. Heuristic evaluation: An evaluation of the MyHR and supporting information website was conducted using a predetermined checklist of usability criteria. A list of usability violations for both websites was identified. RESULTS: Total number of resources grew from 80 in 2016 to 233 in 2018. There was little change since 2016 to average readability levels, target audiences, presentation style, links between resources and usability of MyHR. Compared to 2016, this study demonstrated increases in resources from non-government organisations; video resources; translated resources; and resources with themes of privacy, security and post-registration use. CONCLUSION: This study identified some improvements in information quality since 2016, but gaps remain in information quality and usability which may negatively impact the ability for people with low health literacy to access and use MyHR. IMPLICATIONS: This study provides a framework for ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the suitability of MyHR for people at risk of low health literacy.


Subject(s)
Consumer Health Information/legislation & jurisprudence , Consumer Health Information/standards , Health Literacy , Patient Rights , Privacy , Access to Information , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 210-218, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392951

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To summarise the state of the art during the year 2020 in consumer health informatics and education, with a special emphasis on "Managing Pandemics with Health Informatics - Successes and Challenges". METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of articles published in PubMed using a predefined set of queries, which identified 147 potential articles for review. These articles were screened according to topic relevance and 15 were selected for consideration of best paper candidates, which were then presented to a panel of international experts for full paper review and scoring. The top five papers were discussed in a consensus meeting. Three papers received the highest score from the expert panel, and these papers were selected to be representative papers on consumer informatics for managing pandemics in the year 2020. RESULTS: Bibliometrics analysis conducted on words found in abstracts of the candidate papers revealed 4 clusters of articles, where the clustering outcomes explained 77.04% of the dispersion. The first cluster composed of articles related to the use of mobile apps for video consultation and telehealth during the pandemic. The second revealed studies reporting the lived experience of healthcare workers and patients during COVID-19. The third focused on ways people used the internet to seek for health information during the pandemic and the dissemination of fake news. The last cluster composed of articles reporting the use of social listening methods (e.g., via tweet hashtags) to explore the spread of the virus around the world. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) constitutes a grave risk to the global community and sparks a significant increase in public interest and media coverage, especially on social media. Consumers are facing a new set of challenges that were not considered before COVID-19, often finding themselves in a world that is constantly changing-blended with facts and fake information-and unable to decide what to do next. Despite most people understanding the good will behind public health policies, one must not forget it is individuals we are supporting and that their personal circumstances may affect how they perceive and comply with these policies. Consumers more than ever need help to make sense of the uncertainty and their situation and we need to help them navigate the best option in a world that is constantly evolving.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Informatics , Medical Informatics Applications , Consumer Health Information , Female , Health Services Research , Humans , Male
16.
Front Public Health ; 8: 616603, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389251

ABSTRACT

Health information-seeking behavior is the process of gathering information about health and disease and can be influential for health-related perception and behavior. University students are an important target group for prevention and health promotion and largely belong to an age group that is considered to play a leading role in propagating the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in Germany. The paper deals with students' health information-seeking behavior before and during the corona crisis, aiming to give insights into its determinants and implications. Using the example of a large German comprehensive university and based on two cross-sectional surveys in the summer of 2019 (n = 4,351) and 2020 (n = 3,066), we investigate which information channels students use for health information, how information seeking changes during the course of the pandemic, and to what extent information seeking is associated with risk perception and risk behavior. For a subsample of participants that participated in both surveys (n = 443), we also trace developments at the individual level through a longitudinal analysis. The results show that students' health information seeking takes place primarily online and changed markedly during the corona crisis. The comparatively high relevance of sources that are largely based on unchecked user-generated content raises the concern whether students' health information-seeking behavior guarantees the necessary quality and reliability of health information. Significant correlations between the intensity of corona-related information seeking, risk perception, and actual risk behavior were found.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Information Seeking Behavior , Students , Adult , Female , Germany , Health Behavior , Health Literacy , Health Promotion , Health Status , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
17.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(1): 13-21, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapidly evolving COVID-19 pandemic has become a global health crisis. Several factors influencing risk perception have been identified, including knowledge of the disease, information sources, and emotional states. Prior studies on COVID-19-related risk perception primarily focused on the general public, with little data available on COVID-19 patients. PURPOSE: To investigate COVID-19 patients' risk perception, knowledge of the disease, information sources, and emotional states in the epicenter, Wuhan, during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. METHODS: Data were collected online using self-administered electronic questionnaire developed with reference to previous relevant studies and publications by the World Health Organization. FINDINGS: A higher level of perceived risk was found in relation to COVID-19 as compared to other potential health threats. Knowledge gaps existed regarding transmission and prevention of COVID-19. Additionally, risk perception was negatively related to knowledge and positively related to depressive states. Moreover, social media was a primary source for COVID-19 information, whereas the most trusted sources were health professionals. DISCUSSION: Realistic perception of risk should be encouraged considering both physical and mental health while developing relevant strategies. Furthermore, risk communication needs to be specifically tailored for various target groups, such as the elderly and mentally vulnerable individuals, with the adoption of popular media platforms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patients/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patients/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
18.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(11): 3051-3057, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365088

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the importance of using information and communication technology (ICT) to address daily and healthcare needs. The barriers for older adults in the United States to learn a new technology to go online during the pandemic remain to be studied. METHODS: Using data from the 2019-2020 National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), a nationally representative survey of older Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older in the United States, we used multivariable logistic regression models to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with learning a new technology to go online during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Our sample represented 23,547,688 older adults nationally, of which the majority (60.2%) increased ICT use during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, most older adults (71.8%) did not report learning a new technology to go online. Those who did not learn a new technology to go online had less of an increase in ICT use than those who learned either with help or by themselves (50.7% vs. 78.4% or 89.2% respectively, p < 0.01). The odds of learning a new technology decreased with increasing age (aOR [95%CI] = 0.96 [0.94-0.98]), being male (aOR [95%CI] = 0.56 [0.45-0.72]), having lower than high school educational attainment (aOR [95%CI] = 0.38 [0.29-0.50]), decreasing income levels (aORs ranged from 0.28 to 0.54), and self-reported fair or poor general health (aOR [95%CI] = 0.65 [0.47-0.90]). CONCLUSION: The identified sociodemographic and clinical factors could inform targeted intervention strategies to improve ICT use among older adults during the evolving COVID-19 pandemic and in the future.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Computers , Communication Barriers , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Information Seeking Behavior , Information Technology/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Attitude to Health , Female , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , United States
19.
Am J Public Health ; 111(7): 1348-1351, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360669

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To examine prevalence and predictors of digital health engagement among the US population. Methods. We analyzed nationally representative cross-sectional data on 7 digital health engagement behaviors, as well as demographic and socioeconomic predictors, from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS 5, cycle 2, collected in 2018; n = 2698-3504). We fitted multivariable logistic regression models using weighted survey responses to generate population estimates. Results. Digitally seeking health information (70.14%) was relatively common, whereas using health apps (39.53%) and using a digital device to track health metrics (35.37%) or health goal progress (38.99%) were less common. Digitally communicating with one's health care providers (35.58%) was moderate, whereas sharing health data with providers (17.20%) and sharing health information on social media (14.02%) were uncommon. Being female, younger than 65 years, a college graduate, and a smart device owner positively predicted several digital health engagement behaviors (odds ratio range = 0.09-4.21; P value range < .001-.03). Conclusions. Many public health goals depend on a digitally engaged populace. These data highlight potential barriers to 7 key digital engagement behaviors that could be targeted for intervention.


Subject(s)
Consumer Health Information/methods , Digital Technology/statistics & numerical data , Health Behavior , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Fitness Trackers/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Public Health , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors
20.
CMAJ ; 193(31): E1203-E1212, 2021 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1350176

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated disparities in poverty and illness for people in vulnerable circumstances in ethnocultural communities. We sought to understand the evolving impacts of COVID-19 on ethnocultural communities to inform intersectoral advocacy and community action. METHODS: The Illuminate Project used participatory action research, with cultural health brokers as peer researchers, from Sept. 21 to Dec. 31, 2020, in Edmonton, Alberta. Twenty-one peer researchers collected narratives from members of ethnocultural communities and self-interpreted them as they entered the narratives into the SenseMaker platform, a mixed-method data collection tool. The entire research team analyzed real-time, aggregate, quantitative and qualitative data to identify emerging thematic domains, then visualized these domains with social network analysis. RESULTS: Brokers serving diverse communities collected 773 narratives. Identified domains illuminate the evolving and entangled impacts of COVID-19 including the following: COVID-19 prevention and management; care of acute, chronic and serious illnesses other than COVID-19; maternal care; mental health and triggers of past trauma; financial insecurity; impact on children and youth and seniors; and legal concerns. We identified that community social capital and cultural brokering are key assets that facilitate access to formal health and social system supports. INTERPRETATION: The Illuminate Project has illustrated the entangled, systemic issues that result in poor health among vulnerable members of ethnocultural communities, and the exacerbating effects of COVID-19, which also increased barriers to mitigation. Cultural brokering and community social capital are key supports for people during the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings can inform policy to reduce harm and support community resiliency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Community Health Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Vulnerable Populations/ethnology , Alberta/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Consumer Health Information , Female , Financial Stress , Health Services Research , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Male , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Capital , Social Network Analysis , Social Support
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