Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 24
Filter
1.
Front Public Health ; 8: 616603, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389251

ABSTRACT

Health information-seeking behavior is the process of gathering information about health and disease and can be influential for health-related perception and behavior. University students are an important target group for prevention and health promotion and largely belong to an age group that is considered to play a leading role in propagating the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in Germany. The paper deals with students' health information-seeking behavior before and during the corona crisis, aiming to give insights into its determinants and implications. Using the example of a large German comprehensive university and based on two cross-sectional surveys in the summer of 2019 (n = 4,351) and 2020 (n = 3,066), we investigate which information channels students use for health information, how information seeking changes during the course of the pandemic, and to what extent information seeking is associated with risk perception and risk behavior. For a subsample of participants that participated in both surveys (n = 443), we also trace developments at the individual level through a longitudinal analysis. The results show that students' health information seeking takes place primarily online and changed markedly during the corona crisis. The comparatively high relevance of sources that are largely based on unchecked user-generated content raises the concern whether students' health information-seeking behavior guarantees the necessary quality and reliability of health information. Significant correlations between the intensity of corona-related information seeking, risk perception, and actual risk behavior were found.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Information Seeking Behavior , Students , Adult , Female , Germany , Health Behavior , Health Literacy , Health Promotion , Health Status , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
2.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(1): 13-21, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapidly evolving COVID-19 pandemic has become a global health crisis. Several factors influencing risk perception have been identified, including knowledge of the disease, information sources, and emotional states. Prior studies on COVID-19-related risk perception primarily focused on the general public, with little data available on COVID-19 patients. PURPOSE: To investigate COVID-19 patients' risk perception, knowledge of the disease, information sources, and emotional states in the epicenter, Wuhan, during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. METHODS: Data were collected online using self-administered electronic questionnaire developed with reference to previous relevant studies and publications by the World Health Organization. FINDINGS: A higher level of perceived risk was found in relation to COVID-19 as compared to other potential health threats. Knowledge gaps existed regarding transmission and prevention of COVID-19. Additionally, risk perception was negatively related to knowledge and positively related to depressive states. Moreover, social media was a primary source for COVID-19 information, whereas the most trusted sources were health professionals. DISCUSSION: Realistic perception of risk should be encouraged considering both physical and mental health while developing relevant strategies. Furthermore, risk communication needs to be specifically tailored for various target groups, such as the elderly and mentally vulnerable individuals, with the adoption of popular media platforms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patients/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patients/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(11): 3051-3057, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365088

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the importance of using information and communication technology (ICT) to address daily and healthcare needs. The barriers for older adults in the United States to learn a new technology to go online during the pandemic remain to be studied. METHODS: Using data from the 2019-2020 National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), a nationally representative survey of older Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older in the United States, we used multivariable logistic regression models to identify sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with learning a new technology to go online during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Our sample represented 23,547,688 older adults nationally, of which the majority (60.2%) increased ICT use during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, most older adults (71.8%) did not report learning a new technology to go online. Those who did not learn a new technology to go online had less of an increase in ICT use than those who learned either with help or by themselves (50.7% vs. 78.4% or 89.2% respectively, p < 0.01). The odds of learning a new technology decreased with increasing age (aOR [95%CI] = 0.96 [0.94-0.98]), being male (aOR [95%CI] = 0.56 [0.45-0.72]), having lower than high school educational attainment (aOR [95%CI] = 0.38 [0.29-0.50]), decreasing income levels (aORs ranged from 0.28 to 0.54), and self-reported fair or poor general health (aOR [95%CI] = 0.65 [0.47-0.90]). CONCLUSION: The identified sociodemographic and clinical factors could inform targeted intervention strategies to improve ICT use among older adults during the evolving COVID-19 pandemic and in the future.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Computers , Communication Barriers , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Information Seeking Behavior , Information Technology/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Attitude to Health , Female , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , United States
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(6): e29395, 2021 06 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262585

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2020, the number of internet users surpassed 4.6 billion. Individuals who create and share digital data can leave a trail of information about their habits and preferences that collectively generate a digital footprint. Studies have shown that digital footprints can reveal important information regarding an individual's health status, ranging from diet and exercise to depression. Uses of digital applications have accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic where public health organizations have utilized technology to reduce the burden of transmission, ultimately leading to policy discussions about digital health privacy. Though US consumers report feeling concerned about the way their personal data is used, they continue to use digital technologies. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to understand the extent to which consumers recognize possible health applications of their digital data and identify their most salient concerns around digital health privacy. METHODS: We conducted semistructured interviews with a diverse national sample of US adults from November 2018 to January 2019. Participants were recruited from the Ipsos KnowledgePanel, a nationally representative panel. Participants were asked to reflect on their own use of digital technology, rate various sources of digital information, and consider several hypothetical scenarios with varying sources and health-related applications of personal digital information. RESULTS: The final cohort included a diverse national sample of 45 US consumers. Participants were generally unaware what consumer digital data might reveal about their health. They also revealed limited knowledge of current data collection and aggregation practices. When responding to specific scenarios with health-related applications of data, they had difficulty weighing the benefits and harms but expressed a desire for privacy protection. They saw benefits in using digital data to improve health, but wanted limits to health programs' use of consumer digital data. CONCLUSIONS: Current privacy restrictions on health-related data are premised on the notion that these data are derived only from medical encounters. Given that an increasing amount of health-related data is derived from digital footprints in consumer settings, our findings suggest the need for greater transparency of data collection and uses, and broader health privacy protections.


Subject(s)
Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Data Collection/ethics , Datasets as Topic/supply & distribution , Interviews as Topic , Privacy/psychology , Qualitative Research , Adolescent , Adult , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States , Young Adult
6.
J Psychosom Res ; 146: 110504, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219301

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to provide information on changes in mental health among disadvantaged immigrants from Sub-Saharan Africa in the Greater Paris area and their level of information about Covid-19. METHODS: Prior to the Covid-19 epidemic, the Makasi community-based cohort followed 850 immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa in the Greater Paris area. Between the 1st of April and the 7th of June 2020, all participants scheduled for a follow-up survey were systematically included into an additional COVID-19-related wave of data collection (N = 100). We compared participants' type of housing, level of food insecurity, work and mental health (PHQ9) before and during the first COVID-19-related lockdown, using paired-Mc Nemar chi-2 tests. We next described their level of information on Covid-19 and policy measures, broken down by sex. RESULTS: Among the 100 participants, 68% had no legal residence permit. Food insecurity was more often reported during lockdown than before (62% vs 52%). 9% of participants had a score indicative of severe depression (PHQ9) before lockdown and 17% afterwards (p = 0.17). Only 51% knew about the possibility of asymptomatic transmission of the COVID-19 virus. CONCLUSIONS: This study brings original information on a hard-to-reach population group. Our results suggest that the lockdown had a detrimental impact on various economic and mental health aspects among disadvantaged migrants residing in the Greater Paris area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Adult , Africa South of the Sahara/ethnology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Emigrants and Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Paris/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
7.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(5): e28352, 2021 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218468

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social media platforms such as YouTube are used by many people to seek and share health-related information that may influence their decision-making about COVID-19 vaccination. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to improve the understanding about the sources and content of widely viewed YouTube videos on COVID-19 vaccination. METHODS: Using the keywords "coronavirus vaccination," we searched for relevant YouTube videos, sorted them by view count, and selected two successive samples (with replacement) of the 100 most widely viewed videos in July and December 2020, respectively. Content related to COVID-19 vaccines were coded by two observers, and inter-rater reliability was demonstrated. RESULTS: The videos observed in this study were viewed over 55 million times cumulatively. The number of videos that addressed fear increased from 6 in July to 20 in December 2020, and the cumulative views correspondingly increased from 2.6% (1,449,915 views) to 16.6% (9,553,368 views). There was also a large increase in the number of videos and cumulative views with respect to concerns about vaccine effectiveness, from 6 videos with approximately 6 million views in July to 25 videos with over 12 million views in December 2020. The number of videos and total cumulative views covering adverse reactions almost tripled, from 11 videos with approximately 6.5 million (11.7% of cumulative views) in July to 31 videos with almost 15.7 million views (27.2% of cumulative views) in December 2020. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show the potentially inaccurate and negative influence social media can have on population-wide vaccine uptake, which should be urgently addressed by agencies of the United States Public Health Service as well as its global counterparts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Decision Making , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/psychology , Video Recording/statistics & numerical data , Humans
8.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(3): e23097, 2021 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133802

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the spread of COVID-19, an infodemic is also emerging. In public health emergencies, the use of information to enable disease prevention and treatment is incredibly important. Although both the information adoption model (IAM) and health belief model (HBM) have their own merits, they only focus on information or public influence factors, respectively, to explain the public's intention to adopt online prevention and treatment information. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to fill this gap by using a combination of the IAM and the HBM as the framework for exploring the influencing factors and paths in public health events that affect the public's adoption of online health information and health behaviors, focusing on both objective and subjective factors. METHODS: We carried out an online survey to collect responses from participants in China (N=501). Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate items, and confirmatory factor analysis was used to calculate construct reliability and validity. The goodness of fit of the model and mediation effects were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall fitness indices for the model developed in this study indicated an acceptable fit. Adoption intention was predicted by information characteristics (ß=.266, P<.001) and perceived usefulness (ß=.565, P<.001), which jointly explained nearly 67% of the adoption intention variance. Information characteristics (ß=.244, P<.001), perceived drawbacks (ß=-.097, P=.002), perceived benefits (ß=.512, P<.001), and self-efficacy (ß=.141, P<.001) jointly determined perceived usefulness and explained about 81% of the variance of perceived usefulness. However, social influence did not have a statistically significant impact on perceived usefulness, and self-efficacy did not significantly influence adoption intention directly. CONCLUSIONS: By integrating IAM and HBM, this study provided the insight and understanding that perceived usefulness and adoption intention of online health information could be influenced by information characteristics, people's perceptions of information drawbacks and benefits, and self-efficacy. Moreover, people also exhibited proactive behavior rather than reactive behavior to adopt information. Thus, we should consider these factors when helping the informed public obtain useful information via two approaches: one is to improve the quality of government-based and other official information, and the other is to improve the public's capacity to obtain information, in order to promote truth and fight rumors. This will, in turn, contribute to saving lives as the pandemic continues to unfold and run its course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Consumer Health Information/methods , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Communication/methods , Health Communication/standards , Humans , Internet/standards , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Care , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
9.
J Am Med Inform Assoc ; 27(7): 991-999, 2020 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066352

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Many countries have implemented quarantine rules during the global outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Understanding how hospitals can continue providing services in an effective manner under these circumstances is thus important. In this study, we investigate how information technology (IT) helped hospitals in mainland China better respond to the outbreak of the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a content analysis of pages published on the websites of the top 50 hospitals in mainland China between January 22 and February 21, 2020. In total, we analyzed 368 pages that the hospitals published during the initial days of the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose was to identify common themes related to the utilization of IT by these hospitals in response to the pandemic's outbreak. RESULTS: We identified 5 focal themes across the webpages published by the hospitals during our study period, including (1) popular medical science education, (2) digitalized hospital processes, (3) knowledge management for medical professionals, (4) telemedicine, and (5) new IT initiatives for healthcare services. Our analysis revealed that Chinese hospitals spent greater effort in promoting popular medical science education in the initial stages of our study period and more on telemedicine in the latter stages. DISCUSSION: We propose a configurational approach for hospitals to design response strategies to pandemic outbreaks based on their available resources. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides rich insights for hospitals to better utilize their IT resources and some recommendations for policymaker to better support hospitals in the future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Consumer Health Information , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospital Administration , Medical Informatics Applications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical , Hospitals , Humans , Internet , Medical Informatics , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminology as Topic
10.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(1): 90-96, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059587

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A request for consumer health information training for public librarians led to the development of a specialized consumer health reference and health literacy training program by professional consumer health librarians from an academic medical center. Professional consumer health librarians created an interactive presentation aimed at improving public librarians' ability to respond to consumer health questions and provide vetted health resources. CASE PRESENTATION: Building on professional expertise, librarians at Weill Cornell Medicine developed a live class demonstration accompanied by a representative subject LibGuide to support public librarians who assist patrons with health questions. Skills involved in effectively communicating with patrons who are seeking consumer health information include conducting reference interviews, matching patrons' needs with appropriate resources, teaching useful Internet search methods, assessing health information, and understanding health literacy issues. Originally envisioned as two in-person live demonstrations, the team proactively adapted the program to respond to the stay-at-home social-distancing order put in place in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The team successfully led an in-person live training session followed by an adapted online training experience, the latter designed to complete the curricula while complying with city and state orders.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Consumer Health Information/methods , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Health Literacy/methods , Librarians/education , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City , SARS-CoV-2
11.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(1): e22273, 2021 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Effective communication is critical for mitigating the public health risks associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This study assesses the source(s) of COVID-19 information among people in Nigeria, as well as the predictors and the perceived accuracy of information from these sources. METHODS: We conducted an online survey of consenting adults residing in Nigeria between April and May 2020 during the lockdown and first wave of COVID-19. The major sources of information about COVID-19 were distilled from 7 potential sources (family and friends, places of worship, health care providers, internet, workplace, traditional media, and public posters/banners). An open-ended question was asked to explore how respondents determined accuracy of information. Statistical analysis was conducted using STATA 15.0 software (StataCorp Texas) with significance placed at P<.05. Approval to conduct this study was obtained from the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital Health Research Ethics Committee. RESULTS: A total of 719 respondents completed the survey. Most respondents (n=642, 89.3%) obtained COVID-19-related information from the internet. The majority (n=617, 85.8%) considered their source(s) of information to be accurate, and 32.6% (n=234) depended on only 1 out of the 7 potential sources of COVID-19 information. Respondents earning a monthly income between NGN 70,000-120,000 had lower odds of obtaining COVID-19 information from the internet compared to respondents earning less than NGN 20,000 (odds ratio [OR] 0.49, 95% CI 0.24-0.98). In addition, a significant proportion of respondents sought accurate information from recognized health organizations, such as the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control and the World Health Organization. CONCLUSIONS: The internet was the most common source of COVID-19 information, and the population sampled had a relatively high level of perceived accuracy for the COVID-19 information received. Effective communication requires dissemination of information via credible communication channels, as identified from this study. This can be potentially beneficial for risk communication to control the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Consumer Health Information/standards , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Nigeria/epidemiology , Perception , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(3): 367-373, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999146

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study examined how the effects of the COVID-19 crisis has impacted young Hispanic fathers. DESIGN/SAMPLE: Using qualitative description, in-depth interviews were conducted among Hispanic fathers between the ages of 18 and 24 years, from community-based fatherhood program. The interviews of seven young Hispanic fathers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The participants' initial and ongoing fears about COVID-19 resulted from not having adequate information about the severity of the disease and how easily one can contract and transmit it to others. They also expressed concerns about the threat of the pandemic on their family's well-being, finances, and employment status. Providing for their families was their main priority, with some continuing to work, despite the risks of becoming infected with COVID-19. Despite their many hardships, fathers found strength in their families and remained hopeful in overcoming the challenges during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has presented difficulties and loss for many. Nurses in the community are well positioned to serve young Hispanic fathers to ensure their needs are met. A family-centered approach is ideal for young fathers to provide them equal opportunity to be actively involved in promoting health for themselves and their families during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/psychology , Fathers/psychology , /psychology , Adolescent , Community Health Nursing , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Fathers/statistics & numerical data , Fear , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Hope , Humans , Male , Needs Assessment , Qualitative Research , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
13.
Health Commun ; 36(1): 89-97, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939493

ABSTRACT

Seeking cancer information is recognized as an important, life-saving behavior under normal circumstances. However, given the significant impact of COVID-19 on society, the healthcare system, and individuals and their families, it is important to understand how the pandemic has affected cancer information needs in a crisis context and, in turn, how public health agencies have responded to meeting the information needs of various audiences. Using data from the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service (CIS) - a long-standing, multi-channel resource for trusted cancer information in English and Spanish - this descriptive analysis explored differences in cancer information-seeking among cancer survivors, caregivers, tobacco users, and members of the general public during the onset and continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic (February - September 2020), specifically comparing interactions that involved a discussion of COVID-19 to those that did not. During the study period, COVID-19 discussions were more likely to involve survivors or caregivers compared to tobacco users and the general public. Specific patterns emerged across the four user types and their respective discussions of COVID-19 related to language of service, point of CIS access, stage on the cancer continuum, subject of interaction, cancer site discussed, and referrals provided by the CIS. These results provide insights that may help public health agencies deliver, prioritize, and tailor their messaging and response to specific audiences based on heightened health information needs during a crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Information Seeking Behavior , National Cancer Institute (U.S.)/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Cancer Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Caregivers/statistics & numerical data , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Language , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Smokers/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
14.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1751, 2020 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940018

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Individual protective behaviors play an important role in the control of the spread of infectious diseases. This study aimed to investigate the adoption of protective behaviors by Chinese citizens amid the COVID-19 outbreak and its associated factors. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted from 22 January to 14 February 2020 through Wenjuanxing platform, measuring their knowledge, risk perception, negative emotion, response to official communication, and protective behaviors in relation to COVID-19. A total of 3008 people completed the questionnaire, of which 2845 were valid questionnaires. RESULTS: On average, 71% of respondents embraced protective behaviors. Those who made no error in the knowledge test (AOR = 1.77, p < 0.001) perceived the high severity of the epidemic (AOR = 1.90, p < 0.001), had high negative emotion (AOR = 1.36, p = 0.005), reported good health (AOR = 1.94, p < 0.001), paid high attention to the governmental media (AOR = 4.16, p < 0.001) and trusted the governmental media (AOR = 1.97, p < 0.001) were more likely to embrace protective behaviors after adjustments for variations in potential confounding factors. Women and older people were also more likely to embrace protective behaviors. No regional or educational differences were found in the adoption of protective behaviors. CONCLUSION: The majority of Chinese citizens embraced protective behaviors. Higher levels of protective behaviors are associated with higher knowledge, perceived severity, negative emotion, and attention to and trust in the official governmental media. Official governmental communication is the largest single predictor of protective behaviors.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk Assessment
15.
J Health Commun ; 25(9): 727-735, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-926199

ABSTRACT

Although the influenza vaccine is widely recognized as an effective preventive measure, influenza vaccination rates among U.S. adults remain low. Moreover, influenza-related respiratory illnesses may increase the risk of adverse outcomes of COVID-19. Thus, this study examines the mechanisms involved in influenza vaccination uptake. Specifically, this study investigates how health information sources are associated with perceived vaccine efficacy and safety, which, in turn, associated with influenza vaccine uptake. Analyzing cross-sectional survey data from a national U.S. adult sample (N = 19,420), mediation analyses were conducted. Results revealed that considering vaccine efficacy, health information seekers who assigned more value to medical professionals, medical journals, and newspaper articles were more likely to perceive a vaccine as effective, thus being more likely to receive the influenza vaccine. By contrast, individuals who placed more value in social media were less likely to perceive vaccine efficacy, and, in turn, were less likely to get the influenza vaccine. Turning to vaccine safety, the value ascribed to medical professionals was positively associated with vaccine safety, which, in turn, related to influenza vaccine uptake. By contrast, social media, family or friends, and promotions were negatively associated with vaccine safety, and then influenza vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/adverse effects , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , United States , Young Adult
16.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1635, 2020 Nov 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919052

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The internet is now the first line source of health information for many people worldwide. In the current Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic, health information is being produced, revised, updated and disseminated at an increasingly rapid rate. The general public are faced with a plethora of misinformation regarding COVID-19 and the readability of online information has an impact on their understanding of the disease. The accessibility of online healthcare information relating to COVID-19 is unknown. We sought to evaluate the readability of online information relating to COVID-19 in four English speaking regions: Ireland, the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States, and compare readability of website source provenance and regional origin. METHODS: The Google® search engine was used to collate the first 20 webpage URLs for three individual searches for 'COVID', 'COVID-19', and 'coronavirus' from Ireland, the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States. The Gunning Fog Index (GFI), Flesch-Kincaid Grade (FKG) Score, Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) score were calculated to assess the readability. RESULTS: There were poor levels of readability webpages reviewed, with only 17.2% of webpages at a universally readable level. There was a significant difference in readability between the different webpages based on their information source (p < 0.01). Public Health organisations and Government organisations provided the most readable COVID-19 material, while digital media sources were significantly less readable. There were no significant differences in readability between regions. CONCLUSION: Much of the general public have relied on online information during the pandemic. Information on COVID-19 should be made more readable, and those writing webpages and information tools should ensure universal accessibility is considered in their production. Governments and healthcare practitioners should have an awareness of the online sources of information available, and ensure that readability of our own productions is at a universally readable level which will increase understanding and adherence to health guidelines.


Subject(s)
Comprehension , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Internet , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
17.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1649, 2020 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-909100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging infectious disease that spreads around the world. The lack of effective antiviral drugs and vaccines, along with the relatively high mortality rate and high contagiousness, has raised strong public concerns over COVID-19, especially for people living in the most severely affected areas. This study aimed to clarify the influencing factors for the anxiety level among the Chinese people during the COVID-19 pandemic, with a particular focus on the media exposure to different COVID-19 information. METHODS: A total of 4991 respondents were randomly recruited from a national online panel from February 12th, 2020 to February 14th, 2020, a period when the number of COVID-19 cases surpassed 10,000 in a single day, with the total cases in China reaching up to 90,000. The relationships between media exposure of COVID-19 information, social and geographical proximity to COVID-19, risk perceptions were assessed using hierarchical ordinary least squares regression analysis. RESULTS: The media exposure to COVID-19 information was differently associated with anxiety. Meanwhile, the anxiety level was found to be high in respondents who personally knew someone infected with COVID-19 or those who living in an area with reported cases. Respondents who perceived more risks also reported a higher level of anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the role of media exposure in affecting individuals' anxiety level during the COVID-19 pandemic. Besides, it is recommended that government and health professionals are recommended to adopt effective risk communication strategies to protect citizens' mental health during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mass Media/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Female , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Middle Aged , Residence Characteristics/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment , Young Adult
18.
Nat Hum Behav ; 4(12): 1285-1293, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894397

ABSTRACT

During COVID-19, governments and the public are fighting not only a pandemic but also a co-evolving infodemic-the rapid and far-reaching spread of information of questionable quality. We analysed more than 100 million Twitter messages posted worldwide during the early stages of epidemic spread across countries (from 22 January to 10 March 2020) and classified the reliability of the news being circulated. We developed an Infodemic Risk Index to capture the magnitude of exposure to unreliable news across countries. We found that measurable waves of potentially unreliable information preceded the rise of COVID-19 infections, exposing entire countries to falsehoods that pose a serious threat to public health. As infections started to rise, reliable information quickly became more dominant, and Twitter content shifted towards more credible informational sources. Infodemic early-warning signals provide important cues for misinformation mitigation by means of adequate communication strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Mass Media/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Social Networking , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Risk Assessment
19.
Afr J Reprod Health ; 24(s1): 66-77, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-859354

ABSTRACT

In Africa, the first confirmed case of COVID-19 was reported in Egypt on February 14, 2020. Since then, the number of cases has continued to increase with Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Nigeria, Sudan, Angola, Tanzania, Ghana, and Kenya identified as vulnerable countries. The present study aimed to: 1) identify differences in trust level of COVID-19 diagnosis, recent healthcare utilization experiences, and COVID-19-related knowledge, information, and prevention practices in South Korea, Ethiopia, and DRC; and 2) identify factors influencing trust level in healthcare facilities regarding COVID-19 diagnosis. The present study was cross-sectional. The questionnaire survey was conducted between May 1-14, 2020 using Google forms, and 748 respondents were included in the final analysis. The data collected were analyzed using ANOVA, post- hoc test, and binary logistic regression analysis. South Korea showed higher rate of practice for COVID-19 prevention such as hand washing, mask wearing, and etc. than Ethiopia and DRC. The results showed significant differences with the trust level being 3.129 times higher in respondents from DRC than those from Ethiopia (aOR=3.129, 95% CI: [1.884-5.196], p <.000) and 29.137 times higher in respondents from South Korean than those from Ethiopia (aOR=29.137, 95% CI: [13.869-61.210], p <.000). Gender, age, number of family members, healthcare utilization experience, information, and practice were significant variables. Health education expansion for information and practice about COVID-19 in Ethiopia and DRC is necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Trust , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Consumer Health Information/methods , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Democratic Republic of the Congo/epidemiology , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Satisfaction , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors
20.
BMJ Glob Health ; 5(5)2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-827687

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic is this century's largest public health emergency and its successful management relies on the effective dissemination of factual information. As a social media platform with billions of daily views, YouTube has tremendous potential to both support and hinder public health efforts. However, the usefulness and accuracy of most viewed YouTube videos on COVID-19 have not been investigated. METHODS: A YouTube search was performed on 21 March 2020 using keywords 'coronavirus' and 'COVID-19', and the top 75 viewed videos from each search were analysed. Videos that were duplicates, non-English, non-audio and non-visual, exceeding 1 hour in duration, live and unrelated to COVID-19 were excluded. Two reviewers coded the source, content and characteristics of included videos. The primary outcome was usability and reliability of videos, analysed using the novel COVID-19 Specific Score (CSS), modified DISCERN (mDISCERN) and modified JAMA (mJAMA) scores. RESULTS: Of 150 videos screened, 69 (46%) were included, totalling 257 804 146 views. Nineteen (27.5%) videos contained non-factual information, totalling 62 042 609 views. Government and professional videos contained only factual information and had higher CSS than consumer videos (mean difference (MD) 2.21, 95% CI 0.10 to 4.32, p=0.037); mDISCERN scores than consumer videos (MD 2.46, 95% CI 0.50 to 4.42, p=0.008), internet news videos (MD 2.20, 95% CI 0.19 to 4.21, p=0.027) and entertainment news videos (MD 2.57, 95% CI 0.66 to 4.49, p=0.004); and mJAMA scores than entertainment news videos (MD 1.21, 95% CI 0.07 to 2.36, p=0.033) and consumer videos (MD 1.27, 95% CI 0.10 to 2.44, p=0.028). However, they only accounted for 11% of videos and 10% of views. CONCLUSION: Over one-quarter of the most viewed YouTube videos on COVID-19 contained misleading information, reaching millions of viewers worldwide. As the current COVID-19 pandemic worsens, public health agencies must better use YouTube to deliver timely and accurate information and to minimise the spread of misinformation. This may play a significant role in successfully managing the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus , Information Dissemination , Internet , Social Media , Humans , Public Health , Video Recording
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL