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1.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 13(1): e1-e3, 2021 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593121

ABSTRACT

Chronic non-communicable diseases contribute significantly to Ghana's disease burden. Ghana's ability to achieve universal health coverage is threatened by the rising burden of chronic non-communicable diseases. There is a high unmet need for cardiovascular diseases care, with primary health care for cardiovascular diseases not being readily available, equitable, or sensitive to the requirements of target populations. The contribution of family physicians in the management of the chronic disease burden through care continuity cannot be overemphasised. This is a short report of the implementation of a chronic care clinic by a family physician in Manna Mission Hospital, which is located in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. Before the implementation, there was no such clinic in the hospital and patients with chronic conditions who visited the facility were sometimes lost to follow-up. The clinic which commenced in January 2019 has provided care for patients with chronic non-communicable diseases to date. The most common chronic diseases managed at the clinic include hypertension and heart failure, diabetes, stroke, asthma, sickle cell disease, and joint disorders. This report gives an account of the contribution of family physicians to chronic disease burden management through continuity of care in a low-resource setting like Ghana.


Subject(s)
Continuity of Patient Care , Physicians, Family , Chronic Disease , Disease Management , Ghana , Humans
2.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 840, 2021 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582095

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic poses an unprecedented risk to the global population. Maternity care in the UK was subject to many iterations of guidance on how best to reconfigure services to keep women, their families and babies, and healthcare professionals safe. Parents who experience a pregnancy loss or perinatal death require particular care and support. PUDDLES is an international collaboration investigating the experiences of recently bereaved parents who suffered a late miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal death during the global COVID-19 pandemic, in seven countries. In this study, we aim to present early findings from qualitative work undertaken with recently bereaved parents in the United Kingdom about how access to healthcare and support services was negotiated during the pandemic. METHODS: In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents (N = 24) who had suffered a late miscarriage (n = 5; all mothers), stillbirth (n = 16; 13 mothers, 1 father, 1 joint interview involving both parents), or neonatal death (n = 3; all mothers). Data were analysed using a template analysis with the aim of investigating bereaved parents' access to services, care, and networks of support, during the pandemic after their bereavement. RESULTS: All parents had experience of utilising reconfigured maternity and/or neonatal, and bereavement care services during the pandemic. The themes utilised in the template analysis were: 1) The Shock & Confusion Associated with Necessary Restrictions to Daily Life; 2) Fragmented Care and Far Away Families; 3) Keeping Safe by Staying Away; and 4) Impersonal Care and Support Through a Screen. Results suggest access to maternity, neonatal, and bereavement care services were all significantly reduced, and parents' experiences were notably affected by service reconfigurations. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, whilst preliminary, are important to document now, to help inform care and service provision as the pandemic continues and to provide learning for ongoing and future health system shocks. We draw conclusions on how to enable development of safe and appropriate services during this pandemic and any future health crises, to best support parents who experience a pregnancy loss or whose babies die.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous/psychology , Bereavement , COVID-19/psychology , Grief , Parents/psychology , Perinatal Death , Stillbirth/psychology , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Female , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Preliminary Data , Psychosocial Support Systems , Qualitative Research , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 3-8, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587345

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Novel therapies have dramatically changed cystic fibrosis (CF) and innovative care delivery systems are needed to meet future patient needs. Telehealth has been shown to be an efficient and desirable form of care delivery. The COVID-19 pandemic caused a rapid shift to telehealth, and this presented a unique opportunity to study facilitators, barriers, and satisfaction with this mode of care delivery. We aim to report survey methods, demographics and telehealth use among CF care programs, patients, and families during the pandemic. METHODS: CF programs completed two surveys between July 29 and September 18, 2020, and between April 19 and May 19, 2021. Patients and families completed a similar survey between August 31 and October 30, 2020. The surveys addressed topics assessing the pandemic's financial impact, telehealth modes and experiences, licensure and reimbursement issues, health screening, and remote monitoring. Quantitative data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and were compared to the CF Foundation Patient Registry. RESULTS: Most programs (278 at timepoint one and 274 at timepoint two) provided telehealth during the pandemic. The percent of visits containing either telephone or video components changed from 45% to 25% over the time periods. Additionally, 424 patients and families from various ages and backgrounds responded to the survey and 81% reported having a telehealth visit. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic accelerated telehealth adoption and these datasets are a valuable source for exploring telehealth barriers and facilitators, the quality-of-care experience, financial and workforce implications, the impact on underrepresented populations, and implications for coverage and reimbursement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Health Services Accessibility , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communication Barriers , Continuity of Patient Care , Costs and Cost Analysis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Female , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Male , Organizational Innovation , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
4.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 1-2, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587341

ABSTRACT

The findings of this body of work are presented in the eight articles included in this supplement. The impact and perspectives of adult and pediatric care teams and patient/families are covered with special attention to mental health care, the financial and personnel impacts within care programs, the experiences of vulnerable and underrepresented patient populations, and implementation of remoting monitoring. Commentaries from colleagues provide a broader perspective, offering reflections on the findings and their implications regarding the future CF care model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Continuity of Patient Care , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
5.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 16-20, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587336

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic care delivery models faced unprecedented financial pressures, with a reduction of in-person visits and adoption of telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to understand the reported financial impact of pandemic-related changes to the cystic fibrosis (CF) care model. METHODS: The U.S. CF Foundation State of Care surveys fielded in Summer 2020 (SoC1) and Spring 2021 (SoC2) included questions for CF programs on the impact of pandemic-related restrictions on overall finances, staffing, licensure, and reimbursement of telehealth services. Descriptive analyses were conducted based on program type. RESULTS: Among the 286 respondents (128 pediatric, 118 adult, 40 affiliate), the majority (62%) reported a detrimental financial impact to their CF care program in SoC1, though fewer (42%) reported detrimental impacts in SoC2. The most common reported impacts in SoC1 were redeployment of clinical staff (68%), furloughs (52%), hiring freezes (51%), decreases in salaries (34%), or layoffs (10%). Reports of lower reimbursement for telehealth increased from 30% to 40% from SoC1 to SoC2. Projecting towards the future, only a minority (17%) of program directors in SoC2 felt that financial support would remain below pre-pandemic levels. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in financial strain on the CF care model, including challenges with reimbursement for telehealth services and reductions in staffing due to institutional changes. Planning for the future of CF care model needs to address these short-term impacts, particularly to ensure a lack of interruption in high-quality multi-disciplinary care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Cystic Fibrosis , Health Services Accessibility , Models, Organizational , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Costs and Cost Analysis , Cystic Fibrosis/economics , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Reimbursement Mechanisms/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/methods , United States/epidemiology
6.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 82, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574806

ABSTRACT

Background: Hypertension is the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease in India, but less than 10% of the estimated people with hypertension have blood pressure under control. The India Hypertension Control Initiative (IHCI) was implemented to strengthen hypertension management and control in public sector health facilities. Since late March 2020, lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic limited healthcare access and disrupted the provision of essential health services. IHCI quickly implemented adaptive interventions to improve access to medications. Objectives: To estimate the availability of antihypertensive drugs in peripheral public sector facilities during the lockdown and the proportion of patients who received drugs through community drug distribution, i.e., through Health and Wellness Centers (HWCs)/Sub-Centers (SCs), the most peripheral public sector health facilities for primary care, and home delivery. Methods: We collected data from 29 IHCI districts of 5 states (Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Punjab, and Telangana) during April-May 2020. The population included individuals diagnosed with hypertension and enrolled under IHCI in all public sector primary care health facilities. We contacted a convenience sample of more than one-third of the functional HWC/SC and analyzed the proportion of facilities and patients who received drugs. We also contacted a convenience sample of patients telephonically to estimate their self-reported availability of drugs. Conclusion: Of the 4245 HWC/SC, more than one-third were contacted telephonically, and 85-88% had received antihypertensive medications for community-level distribution. Among 721,675 patients registered until March 2020, 38.4% had received drug refills through HWC/SC or home delivery by frontline workers during the lockdown. We demonstrated the feasibility of community-level drug distribution for patients with hypertension during the COVID-19 lockdown in India. The adaptive strategy of community-based drug distribution through HWC/SC and home delivery appears feasible and may help improve access to hypertension care during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Communicable Disease Control , Continuity of Patient Care , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology , India/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(4): 317-323, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526205

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic prompted the need for rapid, flexible change in the delivery of care, education, and commitment to the well-being of obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents. RECENT FINDINGS: Published literature shows multiple models for surge scheduling for residency programs in other specialties. We describe our experience creating a surge schedule for OB/GYN residents that allowed for sufficient coverage of inpatient care while minimizing resident exposure and limited hospital resources, respecting work hour requirements, and plans for coverage due to illness or need for home quarantine. We also report innovative approaches to trainee education through the use of remote-learning technology and gynecologic surgery skills training in absence of normal clinical exposure. SUMMARY: Our approach serves as a model for adapting to unprecedented challenges and offers suggestions for creative transformations of traditional teaching that can be continued beyond the immediate crisis.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital , Continuity of Patient Care , Humans , Simulation Training , Videoconferencing
8.
Rev Neurol ; 73(10): 345-350, 2021 Nov 16.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513474

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The health pandemic brought about by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) has limited access to neurorehabilitation programmes for many patients who have suffered stroke, traumatic brain injury or acquired brain damage due to some other cause. As telerehabilitation allows for the provision of care in situations of social distancing, it may mitigate the negative effects of confinement. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy, adherence and usability of a teleneurorehabilitation intervention for patients with acquired brain injury. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients included in a face-to-face neurorehabilitation programme at the time of the declaration of the state of alarm in Spain due to COVID-19 and who agreed to participate in the study were included in a teleneurorehabilitation programme. The effectiveness of the programme, understood as an improvement in independence, was quantified with the Barthel index. Adherence to the programme and usability of the tool were explored through questionnaires. RESULTS: Altogether, 46 patients, accounting for 70.6% of the total, participated in the study. Participants significantly improved their independence and showed an improvement in the Barthel index between the start (77.3 ± 28.6) and the end of the programme (82.3 ± 26). Adherence to the intervention was very high (8.1 ± 2.2 out of 10) and the online sessions were the most highly rated content. The tool used showed a high usability (50.1 ± 9.9 out of 60) and could be used without assistance by more than half the participants. CONCLUSION: The teleneurorehabilitation intervention was found to be effective in improving patients' independence, and promoted a high degree of adherence and usability.


Efectividad, adhesión y usabilidad de un programa de teleneurorrehabilitación para garantizar la continuidad de cuidados en pacientes con daño cerebral adquirido durante la pandemia originada por la COVID-19.Introducción. La pandemia sanitaria originada por el SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) ha limitado el acceso a programas de neurorrehabilitación de muchos pacientes que han sufrido ictus, traumatismos craneoencefálicos o un daño cerebral adquirido por otra causa. Dado que la telerrehabilitación permite la provisión de cuidados en situaciones de distanciamiento social, podría atenuar los efectos negativos del confinamiento. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la eficacia, la adhesión y la usabilidad de una intervención de teleneurorrehabilitación dirigida a pacientes con daño cerebral adquirido. Pacientes y métodos. Todos los pacientes incluidos en un programa de neurorrehabilitación presencial en el momento de la declaración del estado de alarma en España con motivo de la COVID-19 y que aceptaron participar en el estudio fueron incluidos en un programa de teleneurorrehabilitación. La eficacia del programa, entendida como una mejora en la independencia, se cuantificó con el índice de Barthel. La adhesión al programa y la usabilidad de la herramienta se investigaron mediante cuestionarios. Resultados. Un total de 146 pacientes, el 70,6% del total, participó en el estudio. Los participantes mejoraron significativamente su independencia y mostraron una mejoría en el índice de Barthel entre el inicio (77,3 ± 28,6) y el fin del programa (82,3 ± 26). La intervención tuvo una gran adhesión (8,1 ± 2,2 sobre 10) y las sesiones en línea fueron el contenido mejor valorado. La herramienta utilizada mostró una elevada usabilidad (50,1 ± 9,9 sobre 60) y pudo ser utilizada sin ayuda por más de la mitad de los participantes. Conclusión. La intervención de teleneurorrehabilitación resultó ser eficaz para mejorar la independencia de los pacientes, y promovió una elevada adhesión y usabilidad.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries/complications , Brain Injuries/rehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Telerehabilitation/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Compliance , Patient Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Program Evaluation , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Virtual Reality
9.
Med Oncol ; 39(1): 5, 2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504271

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on patients undergoing radiotherapy by comparing the patterns of unplanned radiotherapy interruption before and after the COVID-19 pandemic. We enrolled patients who received their first dose of radiotherapy for breast cancer between January 28 and July 31, 2019 and between January 28, 2020, and July 31, 2020. We compared the radiotherapy interruption patterns in 2019 with those in 2020 to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on treatment interruption. Between January 28 and July 31, 2019, 287 patients with breast cancer received radiotherapy. Among them, 19 patients (6.6%) experienced treatment interruption; the reasons for treatment interruption were radiotherapy-related side effects (10 patients, 52.6%), other medical reasons (three patients, 15.8%), and personal reasons (six patients, 31.6%). Between January 28 and July 31, 2020, 279 patients with breast cancer received radiotherapy. Among them, 23 patients (8.2%) experienced treatment interruption; the reasons for treatment interruption were radiotherapy-related side effects (eight patients, 35%) and COVID-19 screening clinic-related reasons (six patients, 26.1%). Among the six patients with screening clinic-related causes of radiotherapy interruption, five had asymptomatic fever and one had mild cold-like symptoms. The duration of treatment interruption was longer in patients with screening clinic-related interruptions than in those with interruptions because of other causes (p = 0.019). Multivariate analysis showed that cancer stage and radiotherapy volume did not significantly affect treatment interruption. The radiotherapy of certain patients was suspended despite the lack of a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis. Precise and systematic criteria for the management of patients with suspected COVID-19 are needed, and the opinion of radiation oncologist in charge of the patient must also be considered.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic
10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(28): e26634, 2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494087

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Emergency departments (EDs) are on the frontline of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. To resolve the abrupt overloading of COVID-19-suspected patients in a community, each ED needs to respond in various ways. In our hospital, we increased the isolation beds through temporary remodeling and by performing in-hospital COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction testing rather than outsourcing them. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of our response to the newly developed viral outbreak.The medical records of patients who presented to an ED were analyzed retrospectively. We divided the study period into 3: pre-COVID-19, transition period of response (the period before fully implementing the response measures), and post-response (the period after complete response). We compared the parameters of the National Emergency Department Information System and information about isolation and COVID-19.The number of daily ED patients was 86.8 ±â€Š15.4 in the pre-COVID-19, 36.3 ±â€Š13.6 in the transition period, and 67.2 ±â€Š10.0 in the post-response period (P < .001). The lengths of stay in the ED were significantly higher in transition period than in the other periods [pre-COVID-19 period, 219.0 (121.0-378.0) min; transition period, 301 (150.0-766.5) min; post-response period, 281.0 (114.0-575.0) min; P < .001]. The ratios of use of an isolation room and fever (≥37.5°C) were highest in the post-response period [use of isolation room: pre-COVID-19 period, 0.6 (0.7%); transition period, 1.2 (3.3%); post-response period, 16.1 (24.0%); P < .001; fever: pre-COVID-19 period, 14.8(17.3%); transition period, 6.8 (19.1%); post-response period, 14.5 (21.9%), P < .001].During an outbreak of a novel infectious disease, increasing the number of isolation rooms in the ED and applying a rapid confirmation test would enable the accommodation of more suspected patients, which could help reduce the risk posed to the community and thus prevent strain on the local emergency medical system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Isolation/statistics & numerical data , Republic of Korea , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Child Adolesc Ment Health ; 26(4): 375-377, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488185

ABSTRACT

In this edition of CAMH, Boege and colleague's 4-year follow-up study supports intensive home-based treatment as a viable alternative to inpatient hospitalization. Youth receiving home-based multimodal treatment fared just as well as those who remained hospitalized longer, with higher parental satisfaction. This study contributes to a sparse evidence base regarding longitudinal outcomes of psychiatric inpatient and intensive outpatient treatments for children and adolescents. Although mental illness is prevalent and increasing among youth, existing systems of care are often inadequate to provide flexible, effective, interdisciplinary team-based treatments, and supports for children and their families. Innovative approaches to providing evidence-based care and tracking outcomes are needed to strengthen the continuum of care.


Subject(s)
Hospitalization , Mental Disorders , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care , Child , Continuity of Patient Care , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy
12.
J Ambul Care Manage ; 44(4): 293-303, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447660

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 necessitated significant care redesign, including new ambulatory workflows to handle surge volumes, protect patients and staff, and ensure timely reliable care. Opportunities also exist to harvest lessons from workflow innovations to benefit routine care. We describe a dedicated COVID-19 ambulatory unit for closing testing and follow-up loops characterized by standardized workflows and electronic communication, documentation, and order placement. More than 85% of follow-ups were completed within 24 hours, with no observed staff, nor patient infections associated with unit operations. Identified issues include role confusion, staffing and gatekeeping bottlenecks, and patient reluctance to visit in person or discuss concerns with phone screeners.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Care Units/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Boston/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Systems Analysis , Workflow
13.
Nutrients ; 13(9)2021 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430932

ABSTRACT

Targeted nutritional therapy should be started early in severe illness and sustained through to recovery if clinical and patient-centred outcomes are to be optimised. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has shone a light on this need. The literature on nutrition and COVID-19 mainly focuses on the importance of nutrition to preserve life and prevent clinical deterioration during the acute phase of illness. However, there is a lack of information guiding practice across the whole patient journey (e.g., hospital to home) with a focus on targeting recovery (e.g., long COVID). This review paper is of relevance to doctors and other healthcare professionals in acute care and primary care worldwide, since it addresses early, multi-modal individualised nutrition interventions across the continuum of care to improve COVID-19 patient outcomes. It is of relevance to nutrition experts and non-nutrition experts and can be used to promote inter-professional and inter-organisational knowledge transfer on the topic. The primary goal is to prevent complications and support recovery to enable COVID-19 patients to achieve the best possible nutritional, physical, functional and mental health status and to apply the learning to date from the COVID-19 pandemic to other patient groups experiencing acute severe illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Nutrition Therapy , COVID-19/complications , Continuity of Patient Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Malnutrition/prevention & control
14.
Actas Urol Esp (Engl Ed) ; 45(8): 530-536, 2021 10.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415156

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about changes in the management of urology patients, especially those with prostate cancer. The aim of this work is to show the changes in the ambulatory care practices by individualized telematic care for each patient profile. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Articles published from March 2020 to January 2021 were reviewed. We selected those that provided the highest levels of evidence regarding risk in different aspects: screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of prostate cancer. RESULTS: We developed a classification system based on priorities, at different stages of the disease (screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up) to which the type of care given, in-person or telephone visits, was adapted. We established 4 options, as follows: in priority A or low, care will be given by telephone in all cases; in priority B or intermediate, if patients are considered subsidiary of an in-person visit after telephone consultation, they will be scheduled within 3 months; in priority C or high, patients will be seen in person within a margin from 1 to 3 months and in priority D or very high, patients must always be seen in person within a margin of up to 48 h and considered very preferential. CONCLUSIONS: Telematic care in prostate cancer offers an opportunity to develop new performance and follow-up protocols, which should be thoroughly analyzed in future studies, in order to create a safe environment and guarantee oncologic outcomes for patients.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Prostatic Neoplasms/therapy , Telemedicine , Appointments and Schedules , Continuity of Patient Care , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Health Priorities/organization & administration , Humans , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
15.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 768, 2021 Aug 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic seriously threatens general public health services globally. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the HIV care continuum in Jiangsu province, China. METHODS: Data on newly diagnosed HIV persons for analysis were retrieved from Chinas' web-based Comprehensive Response Information Management System (CRIMS) for HIV/AIDS from 2016 to 2020. We recorded data for the first 3 months (January to March, 2020) of strictly implementing COVID-19 measures from publicly available disease databases of the Jiangsu provincial Health Committee. We used seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) and exponential smoothing in forecasting the parameters. Subgroup differences were accessed using Chi-square tests. RESULTS: Compared to the estimated proportions, the HIV testing rates decreased by 49.0% (919,938) in the first three months of implementing COVID-19 measures. Of an estimated 1555 new HIV diagnosis expected in the same period, only 63.0% (980) new diagnoses were recorded. According to actual data recorded during the said period, 980 positively tested persons received confirmatory tests, of which 71.4% (700) were reportedly linked to care. And only 49.5% (235) out of the expected 475 newly diagnosed HIV persons received CD4 cell count testing. Meanwhile 91.6% (208) of newly diagnosed HIV persons who received CD4 count tests reportedly initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) compared to the 227 expected. Compared to the same period from 2016 to 2019, PLWH less than 30 years old and migrants were more likely to be affected by the COVID-19 policies. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted HIV healthcare systems in Jiangsu, China. Further measures that can counter the impact of the pandemic are needed to maintain the HIV care continuum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , HIV Infections , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
17.
J Int AIDS Soc ; 24(9): e25781, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384195

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected antiretroviral therapy (ART) continuity among people living with HIV (PLHIV) worldwide. We conducted a qualitative study to explore barriers to ART maintenance and solutions to ART interruption when stringent COVID-19 control measures were implemented in China, from the perspective of PLHIV and relevant key stakeholders. METHODS: Between 11 February and 15 February 2020, we interviewed PLHIV, community-based organization (CBO) workers, staff from centres for disease control and prevention (CDC) at various levels whose work is relevant to HIV care (CDC staff), HIV doctors and nurses and drug vendors from various regions in China. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using a messaging and social media app. Challenges and responses relevant to ART continuity during the COVID-19 pandemic were discussed. Themes were identified by transcript coding and mindmaps. RESULTS: Sixty-four stakeholders were recruited, including 16 PLHIV, 17 CBO workers, 15 CDC staff, 14 HIV doctors and nurses and two drug vendors. Many CDC staff, HIV doctors and nurses responsible for ART delivery and HIV care were shifted to COVID-19 response efforts. Barriers to ART maintenance were (a) travel restrictions, (b) inadequate communication and bureaucratic obstacles, (c) shortage in personnel, (d) privacy concerns, and (e) insufficient ART reserve. CBO helped PLHIV maintain access to ART through five solutions identified from thematic analysis: (a) coordination to refill ART from local CDC clinics or hospitals, (b) delivery of ART by mail, (c) privacy protection measures, (d) mental health counselling, and (e) providing connections to alternative sources of ART. Drug vendors contributed to ART maintenance by selling out-of-pocket ART. CONCLUSIONS: Social and institutional disruption from COVID-19 contributed to increased risk of ART interruption among PLHIV in China. Collaboration among key stakeholders was needed to maintain access to ART, with CBO playing an important role. Other countries facing ART interruption during current or future public health emergencies may learn from the solutions employed in China.


Subject(s)
Anti-Retroviral Agents/supply & distribution , Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active/methods , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Health Services Accessibility , Adult , Anti-Retroviral Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Stakeholder Participation
18.
Adv Rheumatol ; 61(1): 55, 2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anti-rheumatic drugs can increase the predisposition to infection, and patients may be unaware of continuing their treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess whether patients maintain their treatment for rheumatic conditions during the pandemic period and determine the factors responsible for discontinuation. METHODS: Patients were randomly selected from the prospectively collected database of our tertiary referral center. The patients were interviewed by telephone through a standardized closed-ended questionnaire, which is targeting the continuity of the treatment plan and the considerations related to the individual choice. The patients were asked whether they hesitated to visit the hospital for follow-up or intravenous drug administration. RESULTS: A total of 278 patients completed the questionnaire. While 62 of the patients (22.3%) had reduced or interrupted the treatment, only 11 patients (3.9%) stopped the treatment completely. A significant difference was observed between the duration of illness and the discontinuation of treatment. (p = 0.023) There was a significant difference in disease activity between the group that stopped treatment and continued treatment. (p = 0.001) There was no statistically significant difference in other demographic characteristics. One hundred thirty-five patients (48.6%) made the treatment decision by themselves, and 80% continued the treatment. Reasons for stopping the treatment were anxiety (48.4%), not being able to go to the hospital for intravenous treatment (45.1%), and not being able to find the drug (6.5%). CONCLUSION: Since patients with long-term illnesses were found to be significantly more likely to stop their treatment, this group of patients should be monitored.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Withholding Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Antirheumatic Agents/supply & distribution , Anxiety , Continuity of Patient Care , Databases, Factual , Decision Making , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Rheumatic Diseases/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 143, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374656

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted health systems worldwide, gravely threatening continuity of care for non-communicable diseases (NCDs), particularly in low-resource settings. We describe our efforts to maintain the continuity of care for patients with NCDs in rural western Kenya during the COVID-19 pandemic, using a five-component approach: 1) Protect: protect staff and patients; 2) Preserve: ensure medication availability and clinical services; 3) Promote: conduct health education and screenings for NCDs and COVID-19; 4) Process: collect process indicators and implement iterative quality improvement; and 5) Plan: plan for the future and ensure financial risk protection in the face of a potentially overwhelming health and economic catastrophe. As the pandemic continues to evolve, we must continue to pursue new avenues for improvement and expansion. We anticipate continuing to learn from the evolving local context and our global partners as we proceed with our efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Humans , Kenya , Rural Health Services/organization & administration
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